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Article

Wendy Marcinkus Murphy and Kathy E. Kram

The purpose of this study is to explore the different contributions of work and non‐work relationships that comprise individuals' developmental networks to career success.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the different contributions of work and non‐work relationships that comprise individuals' developmental networks to career success.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi‐method approach provides a rich understanding of how work and non‐work developmental relationships combine to support individuals' careers. Survey data were analyzed from 254 working adults who were also part‐time MBA students. Semi‐structured interviews were conducted with 37 participants.

Findings

Quantitative results indicate that non‐work developers provide more overall support than work developers. Support from non‐work developers is positively associated with career satisfaction and life satisfaction. In contrast, support from work developers is positively associated with salary level and career satisfaction. Qualitative data indicate differences in the sub‐functions and quality of support offered by work versus non‐work relationships, particularly in terms of role modeling.

Research limitations/implications

Developmental relationships from different domains emphasize different sub‐functions of support and differentially affect career outcomes. While broad functions – career support, psychosocial support, and role modeling – are identifiable across domains, non‐work relationships provide some distinct sub‐functions from work relationships.

Practical implications

Practicing managers should develop and maintain developmental networks that extend beyond the boundaries of their current organization. Human resource professionals will want to consider how well their initiatives encourage individuals to enlist a variety of potential developers into their networks.

Originality/value

The findings indicate that non‐work relationships are a critical part of developmental networks and individuals' career success.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 15 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article

Thomas Cummings, Per Jenster and Francis Bidault

When a unit of DEC establishes a strategic alliance in Europe with key customer ITT to combat a competitor, the venture proves difficult to manage.

Abstract

When a unit of DEC establishes a strategic alliance in Europe with key customer ITT to combat a competitor, the venture proves difficult to manage.

Details

Planning Review, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0094-064X

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Article

Kimberly Buch and Jack Aldridge

This article identifies the psychological and behavioural effectsassociated with corporate downsizing and the managerial challenges theypresent. These challenges include…

Abstract

This article identifies the psychological and behavioural effects associated with corporate downsizing and the managerial challenges they present. These challenges include renewing psychological contracts, reversing threat‐rigidity tendencies, building post‐downsizing teams, and creating new corporate cultures. A strategy for matching specific Organisation Development (OD) interventions to each challenge is proposed which might aid managers and consultants in providing interventions best suited to the needs of each organisation.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article

Gabriele Fassauer and Frank Schirmer

Professionals are often seen as an implementation barrier to change in public organisations. Although their commitment is judged to be crucial, they often behave rather…

Abstract

Professionals are often seen as an implementation barrier to change in public organisations. Although their commitment is judged to be crucial, they often behave rather reservedly and may even oppose change. The power models and micro‐political theories of change both conceptualise this resistance as a defence of their professional interests, their benefits and their power status. Acknowledging that political strategies, tactics and games played have a crucial role in the implement of change in public organisations, this paper expands this perspective by dealing with issues related to professional identity. Identity‐related conflicts often go beyond the issues of protecting and enhancing benefits and power. Therefore, this paper focuses on the central characteristics of identity and examines the identity‐related aspects of the political perspective of change management.

Details

International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

Keywords

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Article

Abstract

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Article

David P. Schmidt

The transformation of companies into post‐bureaucratic forms oforganization, such as networks, raises new implementation challenges forethics in business. To address how…

Abstract

The transformation of companies into post‐bureaucratic forms of organization, such as networks, raises new implementation challenges for ethics in business. To address how to integrate ethics into network‐based companies, describes the implementation of an ethics programme in a banking institution. Shows how communication problems and the resolution of interpersonal conflicts present important ethical challenges to networks. Presents two overlooked resources in ethical theory – narrative and casuistry – as helpful tools for meeting these challenges and for integrating ethics into networks.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article

Will Swan and Malik M.A. Khalfan

The use of partnering has grown within the public sector of the UK construction industry. Central to partnering is the use of the partnering charter. The charter…

Abstract

Purpose

The use of partnering has grown within the public sector of the UK construction industry. Central to partnering is the use of the partnering charter. The charter establishes the mutual objectives of the project team. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the types of objectives that are identified and the potential reasons for them.

Design/methodology/approach

A number of partnering workshops have been undertaken through one of the University of Salford's Enterprise Units, the Centre for Construction Innovation. Each of these generated a workshop report, which captured the discussions during the day. These have been analysed in order to establish the different mutual objectives that have been identified for different projects.

Findings

The results show that while the key issues of time, cost, quality and safety are still central to what teams identify as successful project delivery, issues surrounding management of relationships including external stakeholders, such as the public, are also prevalent. In addition, there is an increase in identified objectives surrounding sustainable development issues, covering social and environmental goals.

Originality/value

The findings provide strong indications that construction is moving towards a more complex regime of objectives in the context of value procurement and partnering arrangements. The objectives identified by the different project teams show that construction projects are now considering both soft management issues and sustainable development as central to the successful delivery of projects.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article

Allam Hamdan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate what effect, if any, foreign ownership has on the relationship between board interlocking and firm performance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate what effect, if any, foreign ownership has on the relationship between board interlocking and firm performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data on 131 firms from various sectors listed in the Saudi Financial Market during the period of 2016 were collected. Board interlocking was measured using two indicators (number of interlocks and number of interlocks per member) and then it was divided into three levels (1-6/7-14/15 or more). As for the performance of firms, it was measured using two indicators: one operational (return on assets and the other financial (return on equity)). Foreign ownership was considered as a moderator variable. In addition to firm and board characteristics, a set of control variables related to ownership structure was used.

Findings

Results provide some support for the “busyness hypothesis” which postulates deterioration in the effectiveness of directors, in terms of their monitoring role, when increasing the number of interlocks per director. Results also manifest a positive effect exerted by foreign ownership in terms of turning around the otherwise negative relationship between board interlocking and firm performance in the second level of interlocking (7-14) Code Article 12’s limit on the number of interlocking per director to a maximum of five directorships. However, there is limited compliance to this code among Saudi firms. The study indicates the need to comply with the governance code in order to enhance governance which undercut performance.

Originality/value

Highlighting the role of foreign ownership in enhancing corporate governance in a conservative business environment characterized by relational networks with gaps in corporate governance.

Details

International Journal of Managerial Finance, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1743-9132

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Handbook of Road Safety Measures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-250-0

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Article

Melissa Hauber-Özer and Meagan Call-Cummings

The purpose of this paper is to present a typology of the treatment of ethical issues in recent studies using visual participatory methods with immigrants and refugees and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a typology of the treatment of ethical issues in recent studies using visual participatory methods with immigrants and refugees and provide insights for researchers into how these issues can be more adequately addressed.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents the results of a scoping study as a typology of ethical considerations, from standard IRB approval to complete ethical guidelines/frameworks for research with refugee/migrant populations.

Findings

The review reveals that there is a broad spectrum of ethical considerations in the use of visual participatory methods with migrants, with the majority only giving cursory or minimal attention to the particular vulnerabilities of these populations.

Originality/value

This paper encourages university-based researchers conducting participatory inquiry with migrant populations to engage in deeper critical reflection on the ethical implications of these methods in keeping with PAR's ethico-onto-epistemological roots, to make intentional methodological choices that are congruent with those roots and to be explicit in their description of how they did this as they disseminate their work.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

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