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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Leena Aarikka-Stenroos and Hannu Sakari Makkonen

The aim of this paper is to provide understanding on how the buyer can mobilize experience-based information scattered around the business network, by means of customer…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to provide understanding on how the buyer can mobilize experience-based information scattered around the business network, by means of customer references, word-of-mouth and reputation, and how this facilitates the buying process.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative study scrutinizes eight cases comprising buyers of knowledge intensive services and technology innovations. The paper draws on the literature on buying and purchasing, customer references, word-of-mouth and reputational information.

Findings

The findings identify the different roles of references, word-of-mouth, collegial advice networks, and reputation, and suggest that experience-based information provides information on offerings, suppliers and the problem solving situation in complex buying per se.

Research limitations/implications

The article's contribution is to provide a framework depicting the employment of experience-based information in complex buying, which ensues through focal and continuous buying processes. Insights from this research are broadly applicable to the contexts of knowledge intensive, innovation and solutions business. Further qualitative research should aim to form constructs and define their interrelations to be tested in subsequent quantitative research.

Originality/value

This study generates new understanding on how buyers gather and use experience-based information to solve complex problems in buying. It contributes by merging references, word-of-mouth, collegial social networks, and reputation as sources of experience-based information, identifying information embedded in those means, and exploring how the information and means are used throughout the complex buying situation.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 March 2016

Neha Srivastava, Satya Dash and Amit Mookerjee

This paper seeks to empirically examine the distinct antecedents of cognitive and affective brand trust in the context of high inherent risk product of baby care…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to empirically examine the distinct antecedents of cognitive and affective brand trust in the context of high inherent risk product of baby care toiletries. In addition, the moderating role of working status and education is investigated for the relationship between brand trust and its antecedents.

Design/methodology/approach

Extensive literature review was conducted to develop the theoretical framework, which was then empirically validated through a survey conducted on the 507 respondents. Data was analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The study found that brand credibility, brand innovativeness and family influence are antecedents of cognitive brand trust whereas brand intimacy and family influence are drivers of affective brand trust. Further, the working status is found to moderate the relationship between brand intimacy to affective brand trust and family influence to both cognitive and affective brand trust. The study result does not support the moderating effect of education on the relationship of cognitive brand trust with brand credibility and brand innovativeness.

Practical implications

The study recommends marketing strategy implications for high inherent risk product companies such as baby care toiletries that what essential factors they must keep in mind while promoting their brand and winning trust of customers.

Originality/value

The present study is one among those few empirical investigations that examines the role of antecedents of brand trust in less researched context of high inherent risk products.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 18 March 2016

Sylvia Cardinale, Bang Nguyen and TC Melewar

This research explores (1) whether the experience of a winery visit may lead to a customer’s emotional attachment to the place where the winery is located and (2) whether…

Abstract

Purpose

This research explores (1) whether the experience of a winery visit may lead to a customer’s emotional attachment to the place where the winery is located and (2) whether this can lead to the establishment of long lasting relationships and loyalty to the place. The context of the study is the wine region of Friuli Colli Orientali in the North East of Italy.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a mixed-method approach, data from across the zone of Friuli Colli Orientali were obtained through a combination of interviews and a questionnaire survey. With responses from 10 wine buyers in a series of interviews and 210 usable questionnaires, the authors test the study’s hypotheses to investigate the behaviors of wine clients.

Findings

Findings show that a positive winery experience – consisting of relaxing, educational, entertaining, aesthetical and well-served tasting of good products - in a winery, develop both emotional attachment and subsequent loyalty to the place in which the winery is located.

Practical implications

For marketers, it is necessary to have a positive overall experience with a place-based brand. Providing customers with the above positive experiences make them feel attached to the place in which the winery is located and make them desire to return and become loyal visitors of the area. The wineries, providing positive experiences, should make all customers feel at home, attached and should encourage them to visit the zone again. Repeated visits will increase place attachment and subsequently, place loyalty. It is also necessary to gain new customers. The study shows that if the current clients are satisfied, they will spread positive WOM, encouraging other travellers to visit the place-based brand.

Originality/value

Several contributions have been made to the literatures. First, the study identified place-based brand experience (PBBE) dimensions in a winery visit. Second, the study provided information to clarify the relationships between place-based brand experience, brand attachment and brand loyalty in a framework. Finally, the study demonstrated that place-based brand experience lead to place attachment and place loyalty in a new context.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 18 March 2016

Fanny Fong Yee Chan, Ben Lowe and Dan Petrovici

This research contributes to literature on marketing communication by exploring the roles of depth of processing and the dispositional factor, need for cognition (NFC), on…

Abstract

Purpose

This research contributes to literature on marketing communication by exploring the roles of depth of processing and the dispositional factor, need for cognition (NFC), on consumer perceptions of product placement.

Design/methodology/approach

A web-based experiment with a 2 (low versus high prominence) x2 (low versus high brand awareness) x2 (with versus without prior disclosure) between-subjects full factorial design was conducted.

Findings

The results indicate that prominent placements were found to elicit more extensive processing, which was negatively correlated with brand attitudes. A significant negative relationship between NFC and purchase intention towards a placed brand was also revealed.

Practical implications

The study offers managerial and policy implications for practitioners and educators. It is suggested that brand practitioners should avoid placing brands too prominently or in film genres which are cognitively demanding. The low NFC group appears to be more vulnerable to covert marketing. Therefore it is suggested that media educators target this group and plan effective media literacy programs to guard youngsters from surreptitious selling.

Originality/value

This is the first study to empirically examine the role of prominence, brand awareness and prior disclosure in the processing of product placement information and their influence on product placement effectiveness.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 18 March 2016

Yingzi Xu, Sheau Fen Crystal Yap and Kenneth F Hyde

This research investigates customer interactions in an online environment following a service failure, and explores the role of customer-to-customer (C2C) interactions in…

Abstract

Purpose

This research investigates customer interactions in an online environment following a service failure, and explores the role of customer-to-customer (C2C) interactions in service recovery.

Design/methodology/approach

We examine C2C interactions between airline travellers by analysing their detailed conversations posted on an independent complaint forum. We adopt thematic analysis to scrutinise online dialogue that narrates stories about service failures and how they are resolved with the help of other customers.

Findings

Our analysis reveals that other customers act as helpers, educators, listeners and ironists in an online environment following a service failure. We identify information sharing, emotional release, social support, knowledge exchange and learning, and leadership in the online community as forms of C2C service recovery.

Research limitations/implications

This study focuses on C2C service recovery in an online environment; C2C interactions in an offline environment after a service failure are not explored. Future research can apply different research methods to different data sources in order to discover further insights into C2C service recovery.

Practical implications

C2C interactions in service recovery can lead to value creation that enhances customers’ overall satisfaction with their service experiences, and further re-shapes customers’ expectations of the service. Customers are an operant resource for service recovery; thus, service companies should facilitate customer-to-customer interactions that assist successful service recovery.

Originality/value

This research explores the functions and potential impact of online C2C service recovery; that is, service recovery through online C2C interactions. It advances understanding of service recovery by bridging current thinking on customer-dominant logic and the role of C2C interactions.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 18 March 2016

Agneta Sundström, Zahra Ahmadi and Akmal Hyder

The purpose of this paper is to develop a typology based on the market orientation (MO) and innovation orientation (IO) of firms, and to illustrate the extent to which…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a typology based on the market orientation (MO) and innovation orientation (IO) of firms, and to illustrate the extent to which public housing companies (PHCs) fit into this framework.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study of 11 PHCs in central Sweden was conducted to classify their positions in the typology. Interviews with semi-structured and open-ended questions were used to collect the data.

Findings

Four PHC types were identified by combining high and low MO and IO. This study offers insights on the importance of combining MO and IO. The overall findings show that MO and IO combination is not static and must be handled according to context. The MO-IO typology developed could be tested in a quantitative study on a larger sample of public or combined public and private housing companies.

Research limitations/implications

An empirical study comparing public and private housing companies on the basis of the proposed typology in relation to economic contingencies in the environment would further knowledge in this area.

Practical implications

The current study gives managers an indication of their position in the typology, which can be used as a tool for improving performance.

Originality/value

This paper describes PHCs within a proposed typological framework.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2019

Ilgım Dara Benoit, Thomas Brashear Alejandro, Jeffrey Foreman, Christian Chelariu and Shawn Bergman

This paper aims to examine the role of social norms of justice and relationalism in salesperson–sales manager relationships, and their role in developing salesforce…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the role of social norms of justice and relationalism in salesperson–sales manager relationships, and their role in developing salesforce commitment and turnover.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses structural equation modeling to analyze survey data from 402 business-to-business salespeople.

Findings

As discrete foundational norms, distributive, procedural and interactional (interpersonal, informational) justice develop higher-order norms of relationalism, which then reflect on increased commitment and reduced turnover intention of the salesforce. Among the justice norms, interpersonal justice has the strongest impact on relationalism.

Research limitations/implications

The paper shows how each justice norm has a distinct impact in shaping relational norms, and that interpersonal justice has the highest impact. In addition, with enhanced relationalism salespeople become more committed and have lower turnover intentions. Future research could use a longitudinal study, present manager’s side in the model and measure and compare the impact of supervisor- versus organization-focused justice.

Practical implications

To enhance relationalism, and thus in turn increase commitment and decrease turnover intention of salesforce, sales managers should pay attention to the salespeople’s perceptions of justice norms (distributive, procedural, informational and interpersonal justice), especially interpersonal justice, as it has the highest impact on relationalism. The specific ways to enhance justice perceptions are discussed.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to show how each justice norm is unique in its importance to shape the relationship between sales manager and salespeople in a way that increases the quality of relational norms, governing the relational process into a highly committed one. It also shows that among the four justice norms, interactional justice has the highest impact on relationalism. In addition, this is the first study to show that relationalism decreases turnover intention of salespeople.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2021

Benoit Bourguignon, Harold Boeck and Thomas Brashear Alejandro

Salespeople are at the forefront of the external environment where they act as the first responders to critical events and their resulting business turbulence. How the…

Abstract

Purpose

Salespeople are at the forefront of the external environment where they act as the first responders to critical events and their resulting business turbulence. How the salesforce responds to turbulence is, therefore, of great interest both theoretically and in practice. The paper aims to rekindle interest in agility selling, which is the most adequate behavioral sales model to exploit environmental uncertainty.

Design/methodology/approach

An organizational autoethnography complemented with data from in-depth interviews with key salespeople involved in turbulence resulted in the development of eight case studies.

Findings

Salespeople use agility selling through four possible responsive roles. They amplify, innovate, cooperate or mitigate turbulence to exploit its ensuing opportunity or minimize its negative effect for both the supplier and the customer. The article enhances the agility selling model by putting three core abilities in the forefront: (1) forecasting turbulence from critical events, (2) responding to changes quickly and adequately and (3) exploiting changes as opportunities.

Research limitations/implications

The article argues that critical events are the cause of the turbulence that the salesforce must deal with before it hits the dyad. Agility selling represents an untapped research opportunity in business-to-business sales, and sales management, as well as within the overall agile organization.

Practical implications

Sales organizations would greatly benefit in implementing training of agility selling’s core abilities because responsiveness is a valuable tool for salespeople in times of turbulence.

Originality/value

The study is the first to empirically demonstrate the existence of agility selling.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 36 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 March 2016

Piyush Sharma and Ricky Y. K. Chan

This paper introduces a unified conceptual framework for deliberate counterfeit purchase behavior by combining its diverse economic, ethical and socio-psychological…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper introduces a unified conceptual framework for deliberate counterfeit purchase behavior by combining its diverse economic, ethical and socio-psychological perspectives using cognitive dissonance theory. Specific hypotheses are put forth about the interrelationships among counterfeit proneness, ethical judgments, subjective norms, counterfeit product evaluation and purchase intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

A field-survey with 380 shoppers (who had ever purchased a counterfeit product) in Hong Kong across four frequently counterfeited product categories (backpack, luxury watch, software and movie DVD) with varying levels of involvement, usage context and purchase motivation.

Findings

As hypothesized, counterfeit proneness positively influences ethical judgments and subjective norms about buying a counterfeit product, which in turn positively affect counterfeit product evaluation and purchase intentions. All these effects are fairly stable across the four product categories, which suggests robustness of the proposed unified model.

Research limitations/implications

Using Hong Kong as the research setting and a relatively younger sample of ethnic Chinese consumers helps ensure high internal validity but it may also restrict the generalizability of the findings. Future research with a more diverse sample of consumers would help replicate the results reported in this paper. The conceptual framework may also be extended by including variables such as consumer innovativeness, risk-taking and change-seeking as antecedents of counterfeit purchase behaviour and usage.

Practical implications

Findings show that consumers are influenced by a combination of individual and sociological factors when they decide whether to buy and use counterfeit products. Hence, marketers and authorities need a multi-pronged strategy to curb the growing demand and usage of counterfeit products, especially among ethnic Chinese consumers. These results may also help identify consumer segments more prone to counterfeit purchase behavior and to develop special communication to target them more effectively.

Originality/value

Past studies mostly explore the ‘direct’ and ‘independent’ effects of consumer attitudes, ethical judgments and subjective norms on their counterfeit purchase behavior, ignoring their impact on each other and the roles of ‘counterfeit proneness’ and ‘product evaluation’. This paper addresses all these gaps with a unified conceptual framework that incorporates all these constructs using cognitive dissonance theory and provides useful insights about their direct and indirect effects on each other.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 18 March 2016

Danny Pimentel Claro and Ramon Barbosa Rosa

The purpose of this paper is to identify factors influencing firm adoption of internet banking services (IBS). While previous literature has primarily focused on the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify factors influencing firm adoption of internet banking services (IBS). While previous literature has primarily focused on the individual consumers’ adoption, we aim to shed light on the adoption of online banking by firms. We investigate the propensity and speed of IBS adoption and offer recommendations to providers of IBS and firm users.

Design/methodology/approach

To attain the above purpose a conceptual model was based on research about IBS adoption in the firm context that derives primarily from technology acceptance model and diffusion of innovation. We use data from 5,002 firms located in 239 counties, encompassing 52.1% of firms users of IBS of a financial service provider and 47.9% of non-user firms. All sampled firms received an offer to adopt IBS from the financial service provider. Such unique data set was analyzed using logistic regression to assess propensity and a survival analysis model to assess IBS adoption speed.

Findings

Results revealed that firms, with high propensity to adopt IBS, operate with a diverse management board, are large and young, and compete with a large number of firm users. The survival model showed that the diverse composition of management board also speeds up IBS adoption.

Practical implications

Several implications are drawn from our findings. For instance, managers in firms adopting IBS should invest in recruiting and retaining a diverse set of board members (e.g. internal and external with full decision power), which allows for thorough assessment of pros and cons of any relevant decision to be made. We also highlight implications for managers in financial service providers (e.g. Bank) that offer IBS to automate the relationship with customer firms. Managers should consider our study as a template for the selection criteria of firms that are likely to accept the IBS offer.

Originality/value

This is one of few empirical studies to investigate the adoption of IBS in a firm context. Previous studies focused on the individual consumer adoption of IBS. We show that adopting diverse set of board management, growing in size, young firms and facing the competitive environment positively influence firm´s propensity to adopt IBS. We also analyze the time spent by firms from the IBS offering to the adoption, which shows that management decision context play a key role in adoption speed. Our research contributions add to the scarce ongoing discussion about firm´s adoption of IBS.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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