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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Thomas B. Hickey

CORC is an OCLC project that is developing tools and systems to enable libraries to provide enhanced access to Internet resources. By adapting and extending library…

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Abstract

CORC is an OCLC project that is developing tools and systems to enable libraries to provide enhanced access to Internet resources. By adapting and extending library techniques and procedures, we are developing a self‐supporting system capable of describing a large and useful subset of the Web. CORC is more a system for hosting and supporting subject gateways than a gateway itself and relies on large‐scale cooperation among libraries to maintain a centralized database. By supporting emerging metadata standards such as Dublin Core and other standards such as Unicode and RDF, CORC broadens the range of libraries and librarians able to participate. Current plans are for OCLC as a full service in July 2000.

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Online Information Review, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1986

Thomas B. Hickey and Andrew M. Calabrese

OCLC has developed a CD‐ROM‐based system for the storage, distribution, and retrieval of documents. The system stores an ASCII copy of the text of the original document…

Abstract

OCLC has developed a CD‐ROM‐based system for the storage, distribution, and retrieval of documents. The system stores an ASCII copy of the text of the original document. It also stores page make‐up and font definition codes. These codes are used to control an inexpensive laser printer in the production of copies that closely resemble the original document. The authors discuss trends in the information equipment and printing industries that will govern the future application of this technology.

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Library Hi Tech, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

William C. Dougherty and Edward A. Fox

In 1992, Virginia Tech began its participation in the TULIP (The University Licensing Program) project. OCLC agreed to collaborate, providing a turnkey software solution…

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3755

Abstract

In 1992, Virginia Tech began its participation in the TULIP (The University Licensing Program) project. OCLC agreed to collaborate, providing a turnkey software solution as well as assistance with implementation and processing. An RS/6000 and optical disc jukebox were ordered during the spring to provide hardware support. Staff from the Computing Center and Library were identified to help with project administration and implementation.

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Library Hi Tech, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Book part
Publication date: 10 June 2014

Abstract

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Practical and Theoretical Implications of Successfully Doing Difference in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-678-1

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Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2009

Rune Elvik, Alena Høye, Truls Vaa and Michael Sørensen

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The Handbook of Road Safety Measures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-250-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1903

The final report of the Butter Regulations Committee has now been published and it is earnestly to be hoped that Regulations based on the Committee's Recommendations will…

Abstract

The final report of the Butter Regulations Committee has now been published and it is earnestly to be hoped that Regulations based on the Committee's Recommendations will at once be framed and issued by the Board of Agriculture. It will be remembered that in an Interim Report the Committee recommended the adoption of a limit of 16 per cent. for the proportion of water in butter, and that, acting on this recommendation, the Board of Agriculture drew up and issued the “Sale of Butter Regulations, 1902,” under the powers conferred on the Board by Section 4 of the Food Act of 1899. In the present Report the Committee deal with the other matters referred to them, namely, as to what Regulations, if any, might with advantage be made for determining what deficiency in any of the normal constituents of butter, or what addition of extraneous matter other than water, should raise a presumption until the contrary is proved that the butter is not “genuine.” The Committee are to be congratulated on the result of their labours—labours which have obviously been both arduous and lengthy. The questions which have had to be dealt with are intricate and difficult, and they are, moreover, of a highly technical nature. The Committee have evidently worked with the earnest desire to arrive at conclusions which, when applied, would afford as great a measure of protection—as it is possible to give by means of legislative enactments—to the consumer and to the honest producer. The thorough investigation which has been made could result only in the conclusions at which the Committee have arrived, namely, that, in regard to the administration of the Food Acts, (1) an analytical limit should be imposed which limit should determine what degree of deficiency in those constituents which specially characterise butter should raise a presumption that the butter is not “genuine”; (2) that the use of 10 per cent. of a chemically‐recognisable oil in the manufacture of margarine be made compulsory; (3) that steps should be taken to obtain international co‐operation; and finally, that the System of Control, as explained by various witnesses, commends itself to the Committee.

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British Food Journal, vol. 5 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part
Publication date: 24 October 2019

Susan P. McGrath, Emily Wells, Krystal M. McGovern, Irina Perreard, Kathleen Stewart, Dennis McGrath and George Blike

Although it is widely acknowledged that health care delivery systems are complex adaptive systems, there are gaps in understanding the application of systems engineering…

Abstract

Although it is widely acknowledged that health care delivery systems are complex adaptive systems, there are gaps in understanding the application of systems engineering approaches to systems analysis and redesign in the health care domain. Commonly employed methods, such as statistical analysis of risk factors and outcomes, are simply not adequate to robustly characterize all system requirements and facilitate reliable design of complex care delivery systems. This is especially apparent in institutional-level systems, such as patient safety programs that must mitigate the risk of infections and other complications that can occur in virtually any setting providing direct and indirect patient care. The case example presented here illustrates the application of various system engineering methods to identify requirements and intervention candidates for a critical patient safety problem known as failure to rescue. Detailed descriptions of the analysis methods and their application are presented along with specific analysis artifacts related to the failure to rescue case study. Given the prevalence of complex systems in health care, this practical and effective approach provides an important example of how systems engineering methods can effectively address the shortcomings in current health care analysis and design, where complex systems are increasingly prevalent.

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Structural Approaches to Address Issues in Patient Safety
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-085-6

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

Marc Lemire, Olivier Demers‐Payette and Justin Jefferson‐Falardeau

Developing a performance measure and reporting the results to support decision making at an individual level has yielded poor results in many health systems. The purpose…

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Abstract

Purpose

Developing a performance measure and reporting the results to support decision making at an individual level has yielded poor results in many health systems. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the factors associated with the dissemination of performance information that generate and support continuous improvement in health organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic data collection strategy that includes empirical and theoretical research published from 1980 to 2010, both qualitative and quantitative, was performed on Web of Science, Current Contents, EMBASE and MEDLINE. A narrative synthesis method was used to iteratively detail explicative processes that underlie the intervention. A classification and synthesis framework was developed, drawing on knowledge transfer and exchange (KTE) literature. The sample consisted of 114 articles, including seven systematic or exhaustive reviews.

Findings

Results showed that dissemination in itself is not enough to produce improvement initiatives. Successful dissemination depends on various factors, which influence the way collective actors react to performance information such as the clarity of objectives, the relationships between stakeholders, the system's governance and the available incentives.

Research limitations/implications

This review was limited to the process of knowledge dissemination in health systems and its utilization by users at the health organization level. Issues related to improvement initiatives deserve more attention.

Practical implications

Knowledge dissemination goes beyond better communication and should be considered as carefully as the measurement of performance. Choices pertaining to intervention should be continuously prompted by the concern to support organizational action.

Originality/value

While considerable attention was paid to the public reporting of performance information, this review sheds some light on a more promising avenue for changes and improvements, notably in public health systems.

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Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1977

Thomas Hickey

Two types of linear on‐line search have been implemented on a data base of 100,000 INSPEC records, and compared with an inverted search program on the same file. It was…

Abstract

Two types of linear on‐line search have been implemented on a data base of 100,000 INSPEC records, and compared with an inverted search program on the same file. It was found that the linear search which does a character‐by‐character scan of the whole file was too slow to be useful as an on‐line search, but that the second linear search, which uses a linear file of keys to select records for full scanning, was useable on‐line. An algorithm suitable for the on‐line searching of the linear file of keys is presented with run time nearly independent of the number of terms in the search query. Neither of the linear searches can compete with an inverted search in terms of user convenience, but they do not require as complex file‐maintenance software, they use less processing time to build indexes, and they have lower storage requirements than inverted files.

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Book part
Publication date: 22 May 2017

Jürgen Deters

Abstract

Details

Global Leadership Talent Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-543-6

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