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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2020

James I. Novak

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the way object data on Thingiverse changes over time, analyzing the relationships among views, downloads, likes…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the way object data on Thingiverse changes over time, analyzing the relationships among views, downloads, likes, makes, remixes and comments over 500 days.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 30 of the most popular things on Thingiverse were tracked between August 26, 2018 and January 7, 2020, with data collected about the different interactions at five intervals.

Findings

Highlights include: “#3DBenchy” became the first thing to reach one million downloads during this study. The “Xbox One controller mini wheel” achieved the highest documented download rate of 698 downloads per day. The average conversion rate from downloads to makes for all 30 things was one make for every 474 downloads at the start of the study, declining to one make for every 784 downloads by the conclusion.

Research limitations/implications

With over 1.6 million things on Thingiverse, this study focused on an exclusive group of things that have gained significant attention from makers and does not represent most things on the platform.

Practical implications

Although often considered a novelty or niche maker community, this research shows that things on Thingiverse are achieving popularity comparable to digital music, video and imagery, and a large ecosystem of things has been growing that has implications for designers, manufacturers, supply chain managers and universal popular culture.

Originality/value

This is the first study to track the digital behaviors of 3D printable things over time, revealing new knowledge about how people interact with content and the scale of these interactions.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 26 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2016

Michael Groenendyk

The number of 3D models available on the internet to both students and educators is rapidly expanding. Not only are the 3D model collections of popular websites like

Abstract

Purpose

The number of 3D models available on the internet to both students and educators is rapidly expanding. Not only are the 3D model collections of popular websites like Thingiverse.com growing, organizations such as the Smithsonian Institution and NASA have also recently begun to build collections of 3D models and make these openly accessible online. Yet, even with increased interest in 3D printing and 3D scanning technologies, little is known about the overall structure of the 3D models available on the internet. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

To initiate this project, a list was built of 33 of the most widely used 3D model websites on the internet. Freely downloadable models, as well as models available for purchase or as 3D printed objects were included in the list. Once the list of 33 websites was created, the data for each individual 3D model in the collections was manually assembled and recorded. The titles of the 3D models, keywords, subject headings, license information, and number of views and downloads were recorded, as this information was available. The data were gathered between January and May 2015, and compiled into a CSV database. To determine how online 3D model content relates to a variety of educational disciplines, relevant subject terms for a variety of educational disciples were extracted from the EBSCO database system. With this list of subject terms in hand, the keywords in the CSV database of model information were searched for each of the subject terms, with an automated process using a Perl script.

Findings

There have been many teachers, professors, librarians and students who have purchased 3D printers with little or no 3D modelling skills. Without these skills the owners of these 3D printers are entirely reliant on the content created and freely shared by others to make use of their 3D printers. As the data collected for this research paper shows, the vast majority of open 3D model content available online pertains to the professions already well versed in 3D modelling and Computer Aided Design design, such as engineering and architecture.

Originality/value

Despite that fact that librarians, teachers and other educators are increasingly using technologies that rely on open 3D model content as educational tools, no research has yet been done to assess the number of 3D models available online and what educational disciplines this content relates to. This paper attempts to fill this gap, providing an overview of the size of this content, the educational disciplines this content relates to and who has so far been responsible for developing this content. This information will be valuable to librarians and teachers currently working with technology such as 3D printers and virtual reality, as well as those considering investing in this technology.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 2 May 2015

Aric Rindfleisch and Matthew O’Hern

To identify, conceptualize, and analyze a newly emerging form of consumer-initiated, brand-altering activity that we term “brand remixing.”

Abstract

Purpose

To identify, conceptualize, and analyze a newly emerging form of consumer-initiated, brand-altering activity that we term “brand remixing.”

Methodology

A content analysis of 92 remixes of the Nokia Lumia 820 smartphone case.

Findings

We find that nearly 40% of the remixed versions of Nokia’s case retained at least one element of its standard template. The remixed cases contained considerable congruency with the design elements in the standard template, a high degree of personalization, and no negative brand imagery.

Implications

Our research is the one of the first examinations of the role of 3D printing upon marketing activities. It has important implications for marketing scholarship by showing that 3D printing empowers consumers to physically alter the brands they consume. Our research also suggests that practitioners interested in using this technology to develop and enhance their brands should accept the notion that firms are no longer fully in control of their brand assets. Hence, we believe that brand managers should develop co-creation platforms that allow customers to easily modify, remix, and share various aspects of their brands with their peers.

Originality

We identify and label an important emerging branding practice (i.e., brand remixing). This practice has the potential to dramatically alter the branding landscape.

Details

Brand Meaning Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-932-5

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Book part
Publication date: 19 September 2019

Aric Rindfleisch, Alan J. Malter and Gregory J. Fisher

Retailing thought and practice is premised on the assumption that consumers visit retailers to search for and acquire objects produced by manufacturers. In essence, we…

Abstract

Retailing thought and practice is premised on the assumption that consumers visit retailers to search for and acquire objects produced by manufacturers. In essence, we assume that the acts of consuming and producing are conducted by separate entities. This unspoken yet familiar premise shapes the questions retail scholars ask and the way retail practitioners think about their industry. Although this assumption accurately depicted retailing since the Industrial Revolution, its relevance is being challenged by a growing set of individuals who are equipped with new digital tools to engage in self-manufacturing. In this chapter, we examine self-manufacturing with a particular focus on the recent rise of desktop 3D printing. After discussing this new technology and reviewing the literature, we offer a conceptual classification of four distinct types of 3D printed objects and use this classification to inform a content analysis of over 400 of these objects. Based on this review and analysis, we discuss the implications of self-manufacturing for retailing thought and practice.

Details

Marketing in a Digital World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-339-1

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Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 36 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 17 September 2018

Bridget Dalton and Kirsten Musetti

Purpose – The purpose is to expand multimodal composition frameworks and practices to include tactile design and use of maker technologies, situated in a larger context of…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose is to expand multimodal composition frameworks and practices to include tactile design and use of maker technologies, situated in a larger context of designing for equity and increasing access to picture books for children with visual impairments.

Design – As part of the Build a Better Book project, we designed workshops to engage students in composing tactile books enhanced with sound and Braille for young children with visual impairments. Education undergraduates in a children’s literature class crafted tactile retellings over a 2-session workshop, and high school students in an ELA class designed and fabricated 3D printed tactile books over several weeks.

Findings – Both pre-service candidates and high school students developed awareness of the importance of inclusive, equity-oriented design of picture books, and especially for children with visual impairments. They collaborated in teams, developing design skills manipulating texture, shape, size and spatial arrangement to express their tactile retellings and enhanced meaning with sound. The high school students had more opportunity to build technical and computational thinking through their use of Makey Makey, Scratch, and TinkerCad.

Practical Implications – Multimodal composition and making can be effectively integrated into pre-service candidates’ literacy education, as well as high school English Language Arts, to develop multimodal communication and inclusive design skills and values. Success depends on interdisciplinary expertise (e.g., children’s books, tactile design, making technologies, etc.), and sufficient access to physical and digital materials and tools.

Details

Best Practices in Teaching Digital Literacies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-434-5

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Harm-Jan Steenhuis and Leon Pretorius

The purpose of this paper is to explore what underlies the development of the consumer 3D printing industry and gain insight into future developments and its potentially…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore what underlies the development of the consumer 3D printing industry and gain insight into future developments and its potentially disruptive impact on the existing manufacturing industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A combination of approaches was followed. Initially a consumer 3D printer was purchased to gain first-hand experience as part of a practical research case study. Results were discussed with manufacturers and additional information was sought, and triangulated, via a survey and an exploratory bibliometric study.

Findings

Many characteristics are in place to identify consumer 3D printing as a potential disruptive technology for the manufacturing industry. For example, the cost of consumer 3D printing is lower than for traditional manufacturing. However, the current adoption rate is low and the user friendliness and technological capabilities need to improve.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation is the exploratory nature of the study which does not allow generalizations.

Practical implications

If developments and adoption patterns continue, then traditional manufacturing industries, distribution channels and the transportation sector may become threatened.

Social implications

Technological advances in consumer manufacturing can potentially threaten several economic sectors, which can lead to loss of jobs and affect budgets of states of countries that depend on sales tax.

Originality/value

One of the first studies to employ experiments in combination with other methods to gain insight into adoption patterns and the disruptive nature of consumer 3D printers specifically, rather than industrial 3D printers or new business models as a result of 3D printing technology.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

– This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

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604

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Many people believe that the key to successful marketing is control. Control over brand, control over communications and control over activities. It is hard to imagine Apple opening up its hardware or software to customers so that they could create their own designs on its products, isn’t it? Or General Motors for that matter. Or Pepsi. With pretty much any major brand you can think of, it is hard to imagine any of them ceding control.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world’s leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 31 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2016

Byounghyun Yoo, Heedong Ko and Sungkuk Chun

This paper aims to examine the changing backdrop of the consumer market in relation to three-dimensional (3D) printing, especially in the context of Web infrastructure…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the changing backdrop of the consumer market in relation to three-dimensional (3D) printing, especially in the context of Web infrastructure that connects consumers and producers with unprecedented diversity and scale and Web 2.0 user-created content in the material domain.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a conceptual architecture and software platform that facilitates do-it-yourself reconfiguration of existing products incorporating 3D printing, mobile 3D sensor, augmented reality (AR) and Web technologies.

Findings

This work shows that prosumer reconfiguration of consumer products is the major paradigm in the era of democratized production. The results suggest that this approach may be used in the consumer market to meet consumer preferences for adopting innovations without redundant consumption.

Research limitations/implications

Verification of the proposed conceptual approach is limited to the use of household consumer products. A critical mass of participants and product information are both necessary to achieve a sustainable ecosystem from the proposed platform. Intellectual property issues rely on the fair use of end-user production in this paper.

Social implications

The proposed approach allows users to swap out consumer product parts or upgrade individual modules as innovations emerge, extending the lifecycles of consumer products and potentially reducing consumer waste.

Originality/value

There is a lack of work on facilitating the proliferation of practical 3D printing through prosumption in relation to existing consumer products. This paper’s scientific contribution involves how 3D printing affords social manufacturing and consumer-oriented presumption in conjunction with mobile 3D sensor, AR, and Web technologies.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

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Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2015

Rhett Moeller, Carly Bastiansen, Laura Gates and Mega Subramaniam

The maker movement is showing signs of gaining popularity as it matures. As information institutions, libraries find themselves admirably positioned to serve as hosts for…

Abstract

Purpose

The maker movement is showing signs of gaining popularity as it matures. As information institutions, libraries find themselves admirably positioned to serve as hosts for formal makerspaces that encourage turning ideas into reality. Though equipment for innovation is becoming more affordable and therefore more available for general use, many products do not include accessible design, which hinders the significant population of potential inventors who have disabilities. This chapter seeks to provide guidance to organizations that want to implement universally accessible makerspaces.

Methodology/approach

This chapter is the result of a semester-long project in which students at the University of Maryland worked with a local library seeking to build a new universally accessible makerspace. Article reviews, interviews, and solicitations for information from the field helped form the understanding and suggestions provided in this project.

Findings

Interaction with field experts led to specific suggestions for library staff on policy, equipment, and staffing.

Social implications

Accessible makerspaces make it possible for anyone to exercise creative endeavors by providing equipment and materials that encourage innovation regardless of ability.

Originality/value

Literature about universally accessible library-owned makerspaces is very scarce. This chapter serves to bring together writing and practice in both universal accessibility and makerspaces to provide a starting point for other institutions considering implementing similar services.

Details

Accessibility for Persons with Disabilities and the Inclusive Future of Libraries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-652-6

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