Search results

1 – 10 of 20

Abstract

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 October 2019

Ulrike Stefani, Francesco Schiavone, Blandine Laperche and Thierry Burger-Helmchen

The expectations surrounding innovation as the principal mean by which firms gain a sustainable advantage while simultaneously alleviating social problems are tremendous…

Abstract

Purpose

The expectations surrounding innovation as the principal mean by which firms gain a sustainable advantage while simultaneously alleviating social problems are tremendous. However, in the process of developing innovation, many small entrepreneurs, SMEs, as well as large firms struggle to access the necessary finances in order to further develop their innovative projects. The purpose of this paper is to underline some of the most recent tools and practices used to finance novelty.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper synthetizes some thoughts about the financing of novelty and proposes a research agenda based on trends highlighted in the recent literature.

Findings

This paper pinpoints recent advances in finance applied to the field of innovation. In particular, this paper highlights both promising developments as well as the need for more research in this area in order to untangle the links between creativity and financial support, the financing of innovation in developing countries, accounting and evaluation of ideas.

Social implications

The importance of developing innovation and easing access to resources has societal implications. The development of education around finance and entrepreneurship, as well as improving literacy of citizens in these fields could yield a more open view on innovation and financial supports in the future.

Originality/value

Financing novelty, evaluating projects and facing uncertainty are among the most difficult decisions investors take. This paper combines many dimensions of innovation and finance to construct an overview of current and future practices within both domains.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 October 2012

Caroline Hussler, Julien Pénin, Michael Dietrich and Thierry Burger‐Helmchen

The purpose of this paper is to argue for the need to reconcile managerial and economic approaches of the firm. Strategic management seems to be the perfect playground for this.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to argue for the need to reconcile managerial and economic approaches of the firm. Strategic management seems to be the perfect playground for this.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper shows many divergences between the economic and managerial approach of the firm but also highlights many topics where both approaches come in handy.

Findings

The authors underline the topics and theories in strategic management with the greatest benefits of mixing economics and management can be expected and they echo the papers in this special issue.

Practical implications

The paper comes as a warning for those using only managerial perspective without listening to the caveats and ideas put forward by the economic approach of the firm.

Originality/value

The paper offers an agenda of how economics and management could be reunited, and shows the relevance of doing so to both theory and practice.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 August 2015

Amel Attour and Thierry Burger-Helmchen

Abstract

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

Thierry Burger‐Helmchen

The purpose of this paper is to address the issue of evaluating the innovative/entrepreneurial capabilities of small firms in high‐technology industries.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the issue of evaluating the innovative/entrepreneurial capabilities of small firms in high‐technology industries.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach taken is a literature review and case study.

Findings

The contribution of the paper is twofold: in the first part, it is tried to distinguish the different forms of entrepreneurship existing. This leads to determine a form of entrepreneurship, plural entrepreneurship, that is typical in high‐tech start‐ups. In the second part, it is then tried to evaluate the innovative/entrepreneurial capabilities of a firm in such a framework. This is based on a longitudinal case study of a high‐tech start‐up where we explore how different dimensions of entrepreneurship coexist and interplay to create a firm's innovative dynamics depending on its initial resources and those added during the firm's growth.

Originality/value

The paper is an original attempt to distinguish different notions of entrepreneurship including the notion of plural‐entrepreneurship and capabilities in a small enterprise.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 January 2010

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Entrepreneur is one of those words we bandy about all the time and most of us have been guilty of using it without too much consideration of what we actually mean by the term.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Social implications

The need for risk‐taking optimists' determination to succeed to be tempered with caution is clear when managing a large corporation, as indicated by the recent downturn in the financial sector.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 October 2012

Pascal Koeberlé

The purpose of this paper is to promote discourse analysis as a valuable theoretical perspective to further examine how communication and other discursive practices may…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to promote discourse analysis as a valuable theoretical perspective to further examine how communication and other discursive practices may impact strategy‐related outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The author uses a single case study of a French village in an illustrative way, to show how stakeholders (can) communicate to influence the strategic development of an organization.

Findings

A set a propositions is identified as an understanding of why new discourses emerge and institutionalize in a given setting.

Research limitations/implications

As the production of texts was used to observe practitioners’ participation in the strategy process, silent forms of participation may have passed unnoticed.

Practical implications

Practitioners who aim at influencing the strategy process may be interested in identifying the discursive context (producers of consumers of texts) and in improving their conversational skills.

Originality/value

The paper suggests a three‐step process to study the strategy process from a linguistic perspective: identify the producers of texts, examine how the texts are written/told, explain how a set of texts come to dominate a conversation.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 October 2012

Yuri Biondi and Pierpaolo Giannoccolo

The purpose of this paper is to develop a model of innovative industries which face coopetition: firms compete while committing at the same time to R&D joint ventures and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a model of innovative industries which face coopetition: firms compete while committing at the same time to R&D joint ventures and other cooperative agreements. These joint activities are likely to occur in presence of complementarities on demand or supply sides; they raise specific accounting issues concerned with recognition and measurement of intangible resources committed to, and generated from them.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper develops a heuristic industrial economic model characterized by joint utility of outputs for custumers on the demand side, and potential complementarities in R&D activities on the supply side. The authors’ model describes different scenarios generated by alternative corporate pricing strategies. In particular, these strategies (as implemented by firms or imposed by regulators) influence both infrastructure corporate investments and the creation and stability of coopetitive relationships.

Findings

The model scenarios show that especially accounting for intangible resources – related to processes of innovation and R&D – should deserve specific attention. Firms and regulators need to properly account for both hard intangibles that have market prices of reference, and soft and ethereal intangibles that factually have not. A stock method of accounting for intangibles results then which is narrow and biased, because of its focus on hard intangibles alone. A flow method of accounting should be preferred, which tracks the cumulated investment flow of direct and indirect expenditures in innovation and development, properly allocated within and between firms.

Originality/value

The paper argues for regulatory frameworks that enable increasing the positive effects of cooperation while repressing collusive behaviours (technological standardization, fiscal incentives to welfare‐improving innovation and strategy, public research, costumers’ protection, and so forth). Concerning the overall industrial organization, the paper's theoretical analysis shows the need for better recognition and measurement of intangibles and complementarities in costing and pricing, for both corporate and regulatory purposes.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 October 2012

Seiya Shimanuki and Tomoko Saiki

The purpose of this paper is to examine knowledge creation and technological diversity management by medical device manufacturers, to identify strategic directions for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine knowledge creation and technological diversity management by medical device manufacturers, to identify strategic directions for innovation in the medical device field.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses two types of data to assess the importance of multiple technologies and technological diversity in product development: patent applications and approvals of medical devices for sale and use in medical treatment. Additional perspective is provided by the results of a survey of management styles.

Findings

While knowledge‐creating innovation frequently combines multiple technologies, the scope of technological diversity, the variety of types of technology combined may be wider in low‐risk than in high‐risk innovation.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size is too small to justify claims of statistical significance. This research should be extended to incorporate more cases and explore the theme in greater depth.

Practical implications

Companies that choose a high‐risk strategy are likely to be more focused on related multiple technologies with which their researchers are already familiar. Conversely, companies that choose a low‐risk strategy may have more room to experiment since, if something goes wrong, the risk to patient health is lower. Innovative medical device enterprise to seek high‐risk device development is proposed to manage optimal diversity for it.

Originality/value

This paper analyses two case studies relevant to growing interest in technological diversity and knowledge management in knowledge‐driven innovation in the medical device industry in Japan.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 August 2015

Alexandra David and Judith Terstriep

In the search for appropriate solutions to cope with ever increasing road traffic, cities and urban agglomerations across Europe are placing great emphasis on new…

Abstract

Purpose

In the search for appropriate solutions to cope with ever increasing road traffic, cities and urban agglomerations across Europe are placing great emphasis on new transport and mobility solutions, and electric mobility in particular. Being located at the intersection of the three constituent sectors automotive, information and communication technologies and green energy, electric mobility is perceived as future-oriented sector. Innovation in the sector not only requires the collaboration and exchange of knowledge, but also an increase in skilled workforces and distinct job qualifications. These demands emerge, on the one hand, through the electrification of cars, which results in structural changes in the entire value chain. On the other hand, growing customer and service orientation further accelerate such developments. So far, the knowledge about the concrete demands for engineers as knowledge carriers and innovation driver is rather scarce. To shed some light on this issue, the purpose of this paper is to discuss companies’ altered demand for engineers in electric mobility and the role of networks (e.g. clusters).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper discusses two regions characterised as traditional automotive regions (Stuttgart in Germany and Alsace/Franche-Comté in France) and the shift in demands of the companies in these regions using the engineering workforce as an example. Electric mobility related companies were surveyed and asked about their current need of engineers. In addition, the survey investigated the companies’ ways of recruiting engineers, their spatial scope of search for employees and the skills and thematic courses needed to solve the lack of qualifications. The survey results are discussed against a background of regional framework settings and influencing factors of both the regions analysed.

Findings

This paper finds that there is a shift in qualification demands of engineers involved in the sector of transport and mobility. Initiated by the processes along the entire value chain, new skills are required by companies. The current engineers are asked to mix their technical know-how with service orientation and knowledge of new markets.

Originality/value

The world is becoming increasingly mobile. Within the last decades, the number of daily commuters has expanded producing high capacities of road traffic. This has brought several challenges for cities and regions. To face them new transport and mobility concepts are of key importance for cities and regions. Along these lines, well-skilled human capital in the form of engineers is needed to expand the concepts with their skills and knowledge.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 20