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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2010

Theresa Kwong, Hing‐Man Ng, Kai‐Pan Mark and Eva Wong

The purpose of this paper is to compare students' and faculty members' perceptions of academic integrity; their understanding of experiences pertaining to different…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare students' and faculty members' perceptions of academic integrity; their understanding of experiences pertaining to different aspects of academic misconduct (e.g. plagiarism); and to examine the underlying reasons behind academic integrity violations in a Hong Kong context.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methods approach comprising quantitative and qualitative methodologies was used. First, a quantitative survey was conducted with students and faculty. Results from the survey were used to generate interview questions for an interview‐based qualitative study, which consisted of individual interviews for faculty members and focus group interview for students.

Findings

Results from both the survey and interviews showed that faculty members and students do not share a consensus on the definition of the seriousness of plagiarism and collusion. Students, in general, commit misconduct due to academic work, pressure for grades, and teachers' unclear instructions of academic integrity. Faculty members rarely report cases of misconduct to the university and handle the cases according to their own standard.

Originality/value

The topic of academic integrity has received increased attention in the past decade from college and university teachers and administrators around the world. Plagiarism is amongst the most widely studied acts of dishonesty in the area of academic behavior in universities world‐wide. Not many studies have investigated other acts of academic dishonesty and teachers' perception of academic integrity, especially in the Chinese context. The findings from this study provide useful insights for educators to implement academic honesty education programs, especially within the Chinese context, and especially in Hong Kong. The results also provide the foundations in developing an online academic integrity tutorial for the sampled institution.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

Theresa Kwong, Eva Wong and Kevin Downing

The purpose of this paper is to exhibit the integration of learning and study strategies inventory (LASSI) with the City University of Hong Kong information systems to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to exhibit the integration of learning and study strategies inventory (LASSI) with the City University of Hong Kong information systems to promote teaching and learning within the university.

Design/methodology/approach

From the 2006 entry cohort, all undergraduate freshmen at City University of Hong Kong are required to complete LASSI online through Administrative Information Management System (AIMS). Each student is required to take LASSI at three specific times during their undergraduate careers. With the cooperation of H&H publishing, City University has developed a program within AIMS to upload LASSI results of individual students so that the students can view their scores whenever they wish to. In addition to helping the students develop their learning and study strategies, the integration between LASSI and the university's information system provides academic staff with aggregated LASSI scores for their students.

Findings

The integration of LASSI with the university's information systems is found to be useful as students have the possibility of reviewing their progress in terms of learning and study strategies while teachers can design appropriate teaching and learning activities according to the relative strengths and weaknesses in learning of their own classes to assist students. In addition, the input of LASSI data to the City University AIMS helps administrative personnel correlate LASSI results with the other detailed information available in the AIMS.

Originality/value

This paper provides other institutions with insights into the integration of LASSI with the university's information systems to enhance the teaching and learning environment within the university. It aims to inform decision makers of issues in centralizing and accessing students' data to improve teaching and learning.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2008

Kevin Downing, Sui‐Wah Chan, Woo‐Kyung Downing, Theresa Kwong and Tsz‐Fung Lam

The purpose of this paper is to investigate relationships between gender, A‐level scores and scores on the learning and study strategies inventory (LASSI) of undergraduate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate relationships between gender, A‐level scores and scores on the learning and study strategies inventory (LASSI) of undergraduate students.

Design/methodology/approach

The participants for this study were selected at random from the overall LASSI sampling exercise and males and females were compared using the LASSI scales at a Hong Kong University.

Findings

Gender differences in cognitive functioning and achievement do not always favour one sex with the literature related to intelligence testing suggesting that males outperform females on tests of visuo‐spatial ability, and mathematical reasoning whereas females do better on tests involving memory and language use. This paper examines relationships between gender, A‐level scores and scores (LASSI) of undergraduate students and argues that whilst there are significant gender differences in A‐level scores, these provide limited practical information at a cognitive level. In contrast, the data from LASSI allows a more detailed and practical metacognitive analysis suggesting significant gender differences in certain areas of self‐perceived performance, with females demonstrating significantly higher levels of self‐regulation and a more positive attitude to academic study than their male counterparts.

Originality/value

The analysis of the data produced by the LASSI indicates that there are significant differences in self‐perceived metacognition between the genders.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Peter Lau, Theresa Kwong, King Chong and Eva Wong

This paper aims to apply the inventory – Comprehensive Assessment of Team Member Effectiveness (CATME) to examine the development of teamwork skills among freshmen from…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to apply the inventory – Comprehensive Assessment of Team Member Effectiveness (CATME) to examine the development of teamwork skills among freshmen from the Chinese Mainland through a cooperative learning activity (group project) in the context of Hong Kong.

Design/methodology/approach

The questionnaire survey was conducted twice, at the beginning (pre) and end (post) of the group project; qualitative interviews were undertaken after their project completion.

Findings

It was found that, except for Category 5 (having relevant knowledge, skills and abilities), the post mean scores in all items of other four categories declined, because students’ Chinese Mainland backgrounds led to their different understanding toward teamwork, as unveiled by the qualitative interviews. However their project completion enabled them to acquire the relevant competencies, causing the rise in the mean scores of Category 5.

Research limitations/implications

Limited by the small sample size and American-driven CATME, this study did not observe the significant improvements in students’ self-reported evaluation of teamwork. There should be more applications of this instrument into the Asian and Chinese contexts for having it adapted to different national and cultural situations.

Practical implications

As a gap observed in Chinese Mainland students’ understanding to teamwork, overseas education institutions can incorporate this for curriculum development.

Originality/value

As a pioneer work in applying the CATME in the Chinese Mainland situation, this study implied a significant room for such kind of inventories mainly originated from west to incorporate the diverse national and cultural characteristics.

Details

International Journal for Lesson and Learning Studies, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 December 2016

Andrew J. Hobson, Linda J. Searby, Lorraine Harrison and Pam Firth

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2012

Theresa L.M. Lau, Margaret A. Shaffer, Kwong Fai Chan and Thomas Wing Yan Man

The purpose of this paper is to report the development and validation of the entrepreneurial behaviour inventory (EBI), an instrument for measuring the entrepreneurial…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the development and validation of the entrepreneurial behaviour inventory (EBI), an instrument for measuring the entrepreneurial behaviours of corporate managers.

Design/methodology/approach

Through actual consulting experience, interviews and discussions with business owners and company managers, 40 incidents were written to describe ten of the most commonly identified entrepreneurial attributes. The response options were developed using behaviourally anchored rating scales and were validated by rank‐order correlation analysis and t‐tests. The authors then conducted a study to examine the dimensionality of the EBI via principal component analysis and to reduce the number of situations from 40 to 12. A confirmatory factory analysis was further conducted using the data from a second sample of corporate managers.

Findings

Through an integrated series of studies, the authors identified a reliable and valid four‐factor structure of the EBI. The dimensions are innovativeness, risk taking, change orientation, and opportunism.

Originality/value

The EBI is an effective and objective instrument for assessing entrepreneurial behaviours applicable to both business owners as well as corporate entrepreneurs. Using a simulated incident method with behaviourally anchored rating scales, the EBI provides a sophisticated means of assessing actual behaviours rather than traits or attitudes. The EBI is useful for classifying types of entrepreneurs and forming the basis for training and developing entrepreneurial corporate managers.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2019

Ali Bavik

The purpose of this study is two-fold. First, it systematically reviews and synthesizes research on servant leadership in management and hospitality management literature…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is two-fold. First, it systematically reviews and synthesizes research on servant leadership in management and hospitality management literature. Second, by reviewing and comparing the characteristics of the hospitality industry and servant leadership attributes, this study provides insights concerning the conceptualizations and theorization of servant leadership in hospitality management and discusses future research directions.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study reviewed 106 articles published during the period of 1970 to 2018 in hospitality management and broader management literature.

Findings

The characteristics of the hospitality industry and servant leadership attributes were found to be mutually inclusive, both consisting qualities such as trust, integrity, honesty, care, servant behavior, listening and community focus.

Practical implications

Scholars should concentrate on exploring what makes servant leaders unique in the hospitality industry.

Originality/value

The study reviews the hospitality characteristics, and servant leadership attributes offer new research avenues.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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