Search results

1 – 10 of 23
Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Aleem Bharwani, Theresa Kline, Margaret Patterson and Peter Craighead

This study sought to identify the barriers and enablers to leadership enactment in academic health-care settings.

1083

Abstract

Purpose

This study sought to identify the barriers and enablers to leadership enactment in academic health-care settings.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews (n = 77) with programme stakeholders (medical school trainees, university leaders, clinical leaders, medical scientists and directors external to the medical school) were conducted, and the responses content-analysed.

Findings

Both contextual and individual factors were identified as playing a role in affecting academic health leadership enactment that has an impact on programme development, success and maintenance. Contextual factors included sufficient resources allocated to the programme, opportunities for learners to practise leadership skills, a competent team around the leader once that person is in place, clear expectations for the leader and a culture that fosters open communication. Contextual barriers included highly bureaucratic structures, fear-of-failure and non-trusting cultures and inappropriate performance systems. Programmes were advised to select participants based on self-awareness, strong communication skills and an innovative thinking style. Filling specific knowledge and skill gaps, particularly for those not trained in medical school, was viewed as essential. Ineffective decision-making styles and tendencies to get involved in day-to-day activities were barriers to the development of academic health leaders.

Originality/value

Programmes designed to develop academic health-care leaders will be most effective if they develop leadership at all levels; ensure that the organisation’s culture, structure and processes reinforce positive leadership practices; and recognise the critical role of teams in supporting its leaders.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 April 2011

Jamal A. Nazari, Irene M. Herremans, Robert G. Isaac, Armond Manassian and Theresa J.B. Kline

This study aims to empirically investigate the role of organizational culture and climate in supporting intellectual capital (IC) management systems. Specifically, it seeks to…

7778

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to empirically investigate the role of organizational culture and climate in supporting intellectual capital (IC) management systems. Specifically, it seeks to investigate the relationship between organizational characteristics (culture and climate) and IC management systems in the Middle East (Iran and Lebanon) and Canada.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered via a survey instrument and statistical analysis was used to test for significance between dependent and independent variables. Then a two‐stage hierarchical multiple regression was used to test for the nature and effects of country of origin as a moderating variable.

Findings

The findings suggest that both culture and climate play significant roles in developing management systems for IC. In addition, for country, when organizational climate improves, Middle Eastern respondents perceived an even greater improvement in IC management systems compared to their Canadian counterparts.

Originality/value

There is limited research that has been undertaken to compare developed and developing countries with regard to the influence of organizational characteristics on IC management systems. This research is timely given the recent publication of the Arab Human Development Report and the Arab Knowledge Report. This study provides insight into the ability of organizations in the Middle East to develop a knowledge base and reduce the knowledge gap between the Arab world and countries currently classified as knowledge intensive.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 January 2009

Robert G. Isaac, Irene M. Herremans and Theresa J.B. Kline

The management of intellectual capital (IC) within organizations depends on appropriate organizational structures and characteristics. This paper seeks to argue that certain…

2165

Abstract

Purpose

The management of intellectual capital (IC) within organizations depends on appropriate organizational structures and characteristics. This paper seeks to argue that certain structural, cultural, and climate characteristics will lead to more effective IC management.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the theoretical and empirical IC literature, as well as the literatures regarding organic environments, trust, participative decision making, and creative renewal processes, to develop a model relating to the antecedent conditions necessary for the management of IC.

Findings

The model developed will assist researchers in the identification and exploration of variables linked to the effective management of IC within organizations.

Practical implications

It is concluded that managers of organizations need to create organic structures, build trust with employees, encourage creative renewal, and develop participative decision‐making processes.

Originality/value

By integrating several fields of the literature that relate to IC management, the paper suggests propositions that deserve future research consideration.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 July 2008

Shauna L. Meyerson and Theresa J.B. Kline

The aims of this paper are to clarify empowerment as a construct, assess whether environmental and psychological empowerment differentially predicts job outcomes, and investigate…

5451

Abstract

Purpose

The aims of this paper are to clarify empowerment as a construct, assess whether environmental and psychological empowerment differentially predicts job outcomes, and investigate the effects of transformation and transactional leadership on empowerment.

Design/methodology/approach

University students (n=197) rated leadership and empowerment in their workplaces and a number of job outcomes using an on‐line questionnaire.

Findings

Results supported the proposition that empowerment should be separated into its behavioral and psychological components. The dimensions of empowerment also differentially predicted job outcomes. In particular, environmental empowerment was better at predicting outcomes than was psychological empowerment. It was also found that transformational and transactional leadership predicted environmental empowerment more strongly than psychological empowerment.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include that the study was cross‐sectional, used a student sample, and a single common method for collecting the data. The primary implication for research is that empowerment should be separated into two constructs, environmental and psychological.

Practical implications

Practical implications include that environmental empowerment has more predictive power than does psychological empowerment on workplace outcomes and that leadership has a stronger impact on environmental than psychological empowerment.

Originality/value

This study is the first to call into question the way empowerment has been measured in prior studies and provides useful directions with which to pursue future research in this area.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 March 2008

Hal J. Whiting, Theresa J.B. Kline and Lorne M. Sulsky

The purpose of this paper is to construct an instrument to assess employee‐perceived performance appraisal congruency and then to use the scale to predict employee attitudes about…

6570

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to construct an instrument to assess employee‐perceived performance appraisal congruency and then to use the scale to predict employee attitudes about their performance appraisal systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The scale was developed using 28 subject‐matter experts and researcher knowledge of the extant literature. The scale was then completed by a sample of 135 individuals using internet administration.

Findings

Regression analyses showed that performance appraisal congruency predicted overall system satisfaction, perceived usefulness and fairness. Supplementary analyses of the performance appraisal congruency items were conducted so as to refine the original instrument for future research.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the study include: the interviews conducted to develop the instrument were conducted in a single organization; the study used an internet sample that was made up of university alumni; all measures were self‐report; and single item measures were used as the criterion variables. The findings support the utility of the use of the P‐E fit model in performance management systems. Future research should assess outcomes that would be of interest to organizations, such as the relationships with performance system satisfaction and employee commitment and turnover.

Practical implications

If employees perceive that the performance appraisal system is congruent with their expectations, then positive outcomes should be expected.

Originality/value

While congruency has been linked to important outcomes such as job satisfaction, organizational commitment, turnover intention, and actual turnover, it has not been used within a performance appraisal framework.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 57 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

Colleen Lucas and Theresa Kline

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between organizational culture, group dynamics, and organizational learning in the context of organizational change.

14617

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between organizational culture, group dynamics, and organizational learning in the context of organizational change.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study was used to examine cultural and group level factors that potentially influence groups' learning in the context of organizational change.

Findings

Major themes that emerged as influencing organizational change and learning were a culture of mistrust, changing psychological contracts, differing occupational cultures, power differential between groups, and leadership.

Practical implications

When initiating change efforts, an organization needs to assess and understand what aspects of the culture can be facilitators or hindrances and what aspects of the group structures the organization can use to facilitate learning.

Originality/value

This study extends research in the area of group and organizational learning by identifying group and cultural phenomena that, when manifested, had significant influence on group members' response to organizational change and their capacity to learn. In particular, this study highlights the need to be aware of the characteristics unique to the organization and its culture.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Jill Pattison and Theresa Kline

The purpose of this paper is to identify managerial and organizational characteristics and behaviors that facilitate the fostering of a just and trusting culture within the…

2082

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify managerial and organizational characteristics and behaviors that facilitate the fostering of a just and trusting culture within the healthcare system.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies were conducted. The initial qualitative one was used to identify themes based on interviews with health care workers that facilitate a just and trusting culture. The quantitative one used a policy-capturing design to determine which factors were most likely to predict outcomes of manager and organizational trust.

Findings

The factors of violation type (ability vs integrity), providing an explanation or not, blame vs no blame by manager, and blame vs no blame by organization were all significant predictors of perceptions of trust.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations to the generalizability of findings included both a small and non-representative sample from one health care region.

Practical implications

The present findings can be useful in developing training systems for managers and organizational executive teams for managing medical error events in a manner that will help develop a just and trusting culture.

Social implications

A just and trusting culture should enhance the likelihood of reporting medical errors. Improved reporting, in turn, should enhance patient safety.

Originality/value

This is the first field study experimentally manipulating aspects of organizational trust within the health care sector. The use of policy-capturing is a unique feature that sheds light into the decision-making of health care workers as to the efficaciousness of particular managerial and organizational characteristics that impact a just and trusting culture.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 January 2009

Nick Bontis and Christopher K. Bart

527

Abstract

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Article
Publication date: 16 January 2009

Jamal A. Nazari, Irene M. Herremans, Robert G. Isaac, Armond Manassian and Theresa J. Kline

This study sets out to examine how organizational characteristics are related to intellectual capital and how these variables are different between Canadian and Middle East…

1399

Abstract

Purpose

This study sets out to examine how organizational characteristics are related to intellectual capital and how these variables are different between Canadian and Middle East contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was developed to measure the four major study constructs, i.e. intellectual capital, culture, climate, and organizational traits. Each of these constructs was represented by a number of subscales that were subjected to ANOVA and correlations to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The analysis showed that all three categories of characteristics (culture, climate, and other traits) are significantly correlated with IC management. The results also indicated significant differences in all organizational characteristics and IC management between Canada and the Middle East.

Research limitations/implications

Culture, climate, and other traits are important enablers for the effective management of IC. Although the research tested three culture variables, four climate variables, and two other traits, future research should investigate these variables and the interactions among them more thoroughly.

Practical implications

The results have implications for organizations operating in different international contexts. Managers can use the results for more effective and efficient management of organizational characteristics that would foster IC management.

Originality/value

The research provides a comprehensive study of enablers of effective IC management, an area of study that has not received much attention in the past. It also provides insight as to why effective IC management may be more successful in certain countries.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2010

Gary W. Ivey and Theresa J.B. Kline

This study seeks to examine the manifestation and effects of transformational, contingent reward, and active management‐by‐exception leadership across ranks in the Canadian…

6820

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to examine the manifestation and effects of transformational, contingent reward, and active management‐by‐exception leadership across ranks in the Canadian military. It also aims to investigate whether or not the relationships between perceived leadership behaviors and effective leadership outcomes are moderated by hierarchical level and followers' expectations.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 704 military officers and enlisted members rated their leaders' behaviors and the behaviors they expect of their leaders.

Findings

Frequency of transformational leadership behaviors increased with rank, but frequencies of perceived and expected contingent reward and active management‐by‐exception leadership behaviors did not. Transformational and contingent reward leadership effects were not moderated by rank or by followers' expectations. The effects of perceived active management‐by‐exception leadership were moderated by followers' expectations.

Research limitations/implications

When followers do not expect active management‐by‐exception from their supervisors, based on their own implicit beliefs about the types of behaviors their leaders should be exhibiting, but they are subjected to it, their job satisfaction and their attitudes toward their supervisors may be negatively affected.

Practical implications

Transformational leadership is prevalent, expected, and effective at all hierarchical levels. Because of their positive impact on followers' job satisfaction and their attitudes toward their supervisors, the Canadian military should continue to encourage transformational leadership and contingent reward leadership behaviors at all hierarchical levels.

Originality/value

The study highlights the potential importance of congruence between the expectations followers have of their leaders and followers' perceptions of their leaders' actual behaviors.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

1 – 10 of 23