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1 – 10 of 23
Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Theresa G. Mercer, Andrew P. Kythreotis, Zoe P. Robinson, Terje Stolte, Sharon M. George and Stephanie K. Haywood

The purpose of this paper is to discuss a novel life cycle approach to education for sustainable development (ESD) where the students become “design thinkers”.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss a novel life cycle approach to education for sustainable development (ESD) where the students become “design thinkers”.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study on the creation, development and utilisation of educational games by university students is presented. The paper discusses the case study in the context of Kolb’s experiential learning and dynamic matching model, Perry’s stages of intellectual development and Beech and Macintosh’s processual learning model. The data used were from questionnaire feedback from the pupils who played the games and students who designed the games. Further qualitative feedback was collected from local schools involved in playing the games created by the students.

Findings

Overall, the students responded positively to the assessment and would like to see more of this type of assessment. They enjoyed the creativity involved and the process of developing the games. For the majority of the skill sets measured, most students found that their skills improved slightly. Many students felt that they had learnt a lot about effectively communicating science. The school children involved in playing the student-created games found them accessible with variable degrees of effectiveness as engaging learning tools dependent on the game.

Originality/value

This paper contributes a new approach to ESD which incorporates learner-centred arrangements within a full life cycle of game creation, delivery, playing and back to creation. The games can be used as a tool for enhancing knowledge and influencing behaviours in school children whilst enhancing ESD capacity in schools. The assessment also helps forge important links between the academic and local communities to enhance sustainable development.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Theresa G. Mercer and Andrew P. Kythreotis

This chapter discusses how society can be more involved in climate research and policy as a more socially equitable and just way of tackling future climate impacts through the…

Abstract

This chapter discusses how society can be more involved in climate research and policy as a more socially equitable and just way of tackling future climate impacts through the lens of education. The first section discusses previous and contemporary social and political conditions in relation to increased and more equitable and just citizen engagement in climate action in the science–policy domain. The second section then explores how collaborative education approaches through Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) can be ramped up to catalyse increased citizen engagement in climate action. The chapter concludes by critically discussing future directions for research in ESD and climate change as a more inclusive and just form of climate governance.

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Abstract

Details

Science, Faith and the Climate Crisis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-987-1

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Theresa M. Welbourne, Skylar Rolf and Steven Schlachter

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that employee resource groups (ERGs) are a valuable addition to organizations and should be an important focus of research…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that employee resource groups (ERGs) are a valuable addition to organizations and should be an important focus of research, particularly given the diversity and inclusion challenges faced by many businesses and communities today.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors review the ERG literature, develop a theoretical framework using social identity theory (SIT) and suggest research directions.

Findings

ERGs represent a fairly unexplored area of research. Using SIT, a series of propositions is presented for research into ERG effects on individual, group and organizational outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

ERGs have impact beyond the topics explored using SIT. As ERGs become more prominent, there is ample room to conduct empirical research to learn more about the underlying process by which ERGs are affecting identity and employee integration (or lack of) into groups and organizations.

Originality/value

Despite their prevalence in the business world, there has been a scarce amount of theorizing and research focused on ERGs. To help facilitate the development of this work, the authors introduce a theoretical framework using SIT, as well as propositions that can serve to spur additional research on a critical topic for today’s businesses.

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2017

Karin Klenke

Abstract

Details

Women in Leadership 2nd Edition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-064-8

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2001

Robert G. Schwartz and Richard D. Teach

Although unproven, many researchers have assumed that firm strategies remain constant over time, but such conclusions have resulted in conflicting generalizations. This study…

Abstract

Although unproven, many researchers have assumed that firm strategies remain constant over time, but such conclusions have resulted in conflicting generalizations. This study further extends the use of interpoint distance methodology to compare factor structures of marketing strategies of entrepreneurial technology firms at two points‐in‐time – 1989 and 1998.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Joseph F. Michlitsch

Strategy implementation is best accomplished through high‐performing people. Every organization must develop and retain its high‐performing employees who are focused on giving…

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Abstract

Strategy implementation is best accomplished through high‐performing people. Every organization must develop and retain its high‐performing employees who are focused on giving target customers what they want. Key performance factors are explored including clear mission and strategy, selection and training, corporate culture, communications and information, and rewards.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 October 2015

Ikseon Suh and Joseph Ugrin

This study investigates how disclosure of the board of directors’ leadership and role in risk oversight (BODs oversight disclosure) influences investors’ judgments when…

Abstract

This study investigates how disclosure of the board of directors’ leadership and role in risk oversight (BODs oversight disclosure) influences investors’ judgments when information on risk exposures is disclosed. The theoretical lens through which we examine this issue involves negativity bias. Sixty-two stock market investors who engage in the evaluation and/or investment of stocks on a regular or professional basis participated in our study. Our results reveal that the addition of BODs oversight disclosure (positive information) does not carry significant weight on investor judgments (i.e., attractiveness and investment) when financial statement disclosures indicate a high level of operational and financial risk exposures (negative information). In contrast, under the condition of a low level of risk exposures, BODs oversight disclosure causes investors to assess higher risk in terms of worry, catastrophic potentials and unfamiliarity about risk information and, in turn, make less favorable investor judgments. Our findings add to the literature on negativity bias and contribute to the debate on the usefulness of disclosures about risk.

Details

Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-635-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2011

Theresa Mercer, Andrew Kythreotis, Carol Lambert and Gill Hughes

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the significance of student‐led initiatives in PhD development.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the significance of student‐led initiatives in PhD development.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study is presented utilizing Kolb's model of learning from experience to identify with student‐led research training within the PhD process.

Findings

The experiential role of the student in the development of their personal doctoral training and the resultant social interactions thereof, remain as important as the more structured supervisor‐student relationship and other forms of doctoral training within the PhD research process.

Originality/value

This paper contributes new insights into the process of how PhD students can become more empowered by the process of “doing” a PhD, rather than being confined to their own specific discipline, whilst offering future recommendations for students embarking upon PhD research.

Details

International Journal for Researcher Development, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2048-8696

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 January 2013

Cheryl Dozier and Theresa Deeney

Purpose – This chapter shares a model of responsive teacher preparation in literacy labs/reading clinics that emphasizes student-centered instruction.Approach – Through vignettes…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter shares a model of responsive teacher preparation in literacy labs/reading clinics that emphasizes student-centered instruction.

Approach – Through vignettes and the voices of teachers enrolled in literacy lab/reading clinics, the authors highlight clinical practices effective in helping teachers focus on learners including building relationships, learning from students, structuring opportunities for student success, and understanding the power of language choices.

Practical implications – Teacher educators can use practices presented in this chapter in their clinical instruction. In turn, their teachers can transfer these clinical practices and foundations to school settings.

Originality/value – This approach to teacher education creates a culture of collaboration and responsive teaching that moves beyond clinical settings to classrooms and schools.

1 – 10 of 23