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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2013

Damien Ennis, Ann Medaille, Theodore Lambert, Richard Kelley and Frederick C. Harris

This paper aims to analyze the relationship among measures of resource and service usage and other features of academic libraries in the USA and Canada.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze the relationship among measures of resource and service usage and other features of academic libraries in the USA and Canada.

Design/methodology/approach

Through the use of a self‐organizing map, academic library data were clustered and visualized. Analysis of the library data was conducted through the computation of a “library performance metric” that was applied to the resulting map.

Findings

Two areas of high‐performing academic libraries emerged on the map. One area included libraries with large numbers of resources, while another area included libraries that had low resources but gave greater numbers of presentations to groups, offered greater numbers of public service hours, and had greater numbers of staffed service points.

Research limitations/implications

The metrics chosen as a measure of library performance offer only a partial picture of how libraries are being used. Future research might involve the use of a self‐organizing map to cluster library data within certain parameters and the identification of high‐performing libraries within these clusters.

Practical implications

This study suggests that libraries can improve their performance not only by acquiring greater resources but also by putting greater emphasis on the services that they provide to their users.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates how a self‐organizing map can be used in the analysis of large data sets to facilitate library comparisons.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 June 2020

Britta Gammelgaard, Satish Kumar, Debidutta Pattnaik and Rohit Joshi

International Journal of Logistics Management (IJLM) celebrated 30 years of its publication in 2019. This study provides a retrospective overview of the IJLM articles…

Abstract

Purpose

International Journal of Logistics Management (IJLM) celebrated 30 years of its publication in 2019. This study provides a retrospective overview of the IJLM articles between 1990 and 2019.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors applied bibliometrics to study and present a retrospective summary of the publication trends, citations, pattern of authorship, productivity, popularity depicting influence, and the impact of the IJLM, its contributors, their affiliations, and discusses the conceptual layout of IJLM's prolific themes.

Findings

With 23 yearly articles, IJLM contributed 689 specialized research papers on Supply Chain Management (SCM) by 2019. Authorship grew by 42 new contributors adding up to 1,256 unique IJLM authors by 2019. Each of its lead contributors associated with 1.55 other authors to contribute an article in the journal among which 93% are cited at least once. Survey-based research dominated in last 30 years. The h-index of the journal is 73 while its g-index suggests that 133 IJLM articles were cited at least 17,689 times in Scopus. IJLM authors affiliated to the Cranfield University and the US contributed the highest count of articles. Bibliographic coupling analysis groups IJLM articles into eight bibliographic clusters while network analysis exposes the thematic layout of IJLM articles.

Research limitations/implications

The literature selection is confined to the Scopus database starting from 1990, a year before the inception of the IJLM, thereby limiting its scope.

Originality/value

This study is the first retrospective bibliometric analysis of the IJLM, which is useful for aspiring contributors.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

Theodore P. Stank, Patricia J. Daugherty and Chad W. Autry

Automatic replenishment systems that restock inventory based on actual demand triggers rather than relying on long‐range forecasts and layers of safety stock have been…

5486

Abstract

Automatic replenishment systems that restock inventory based on actual demand triggers rather than relying on long‐range forecasts and layers of safety stock have been implemented in a great number of firms in recent years. Now these same firms are taking supply chain cooperation to another level through involvement in collaborative planning/forecasting/replenishment (CPFR). The results of a recent survey assessing current levels of involvement in cross‐organizational collaboration among firms utilizing automatic inventory replenishment are presented. The results provide strong support for positive associations between high levels of CPFR and implementation of operating process change and information system capabilities. Results supported only a very weak association between CPFR and effectiveness in achieving operational performance goals.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

C. Clifford Defee and Theodore P. Stank

The paper extends a central paradigm of the strategy literature to the supply chain environment to foster a better understanding of the elements characterizing strategic…

9242

Abstract

Purpose

The paper extends a central paradigm of the strategy literature to the supply chain environment to foster a better understanding of the elements characterizing strategic decisions that lead to supply chain structural development and performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Strategic literature is reviewed to provide a fuller explanation of the strategy‐structure‐performance (SSP) research stream. SSP foundational principles are linked to supply chain management concepts, and synthesized into an explanatory framework. Propositions for future research are presented based upon the framework.

Findings

An iterative relationship among internal firm strategy, structure, and performance measurement systems is indicated, implying that firm supply chain strategy should be complementary with that of supply chain partners.

Research limitations/implications

The paper presents a content analysis of existing research and a conceptual framework emerging from it. No data were collected nor were research propositions tested.

Practical implications

The primary implication is “know your supply chain partners”. Do their strategies mesh – either as consistent or complementary – to your own firm's supply chain strategy? Strategic alignment is a necessary precursor to deployment of an effective supply chain structure.

Originality/value

The paper shows that SSP theory can be extended beyond the firm to the complex supply chain environment.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 February 2018

Daniel A. Pellathy, Joonhwan In, Diane A. Mollenkopf and Theodore P. Stank

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how a systematic application of middle-range theorizing, which pays particular attention to contexts and mechanisms, can be used…

1766

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how a systematic application of middle-range theorizing, which pays particular attention to contexts and mechanisms, can be used to extend current knowledge on logistics customer service (LCS) in a number of critical areas.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper applies Stank et al.’s (2017) framework for middle-ranging theorizing in logistics to develop a research framework and agenda that can guide future LCS research. Results are generated through a review of the LCS literature and an application of the main concepts of middle-range theorizing.

Findings

The paper outlines opportunities for middle-range research that would extend LCS knowledge in the areas of human and behavioral factors, time-based competition, supply chain complexity, and digitization and technological innovation.

Research limitations/implications

Describing the main characteristics of middle-range theorizing and how middle-range theorizing can be fruitfully applied to LCS research should help to stimulate new knowledge creation in this important area of supply chain logistics management.

Practical implications

By focusing on why and when questions, middle-range theorizing engages with the practical realities of LCS that interest managers and students. Middle-range theorizing moves researchers toward developing a detailed understanding of what actually has to change in order for desired LCS-related outcomes to occur and the contextual factors likely impacting the change process. The paper should, therefore, allow managers to better translate LCS theory into action.

Originality/value

Middle-range theorizing remains new to the supply chain logistics field. The application of middle-range theorizing to LCS research, and logistics research more generally, demands new perspectives on established relationships with the potential to drive original research in areas most relevant to managers.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2018

Chris Tilly, Georgina Rojas-García and Nik Theodore

Recent research begins to explore how organizations of informal workers function, and succeed or fail. Using cases of domestic-worker movements in Mexico and the United…

Abstract

Recent research begins to explore how organizations of informal workers function, and succeed or fail. Using cases of domestic-worker movements in Mexico and the United States, we seek to extend this research by adding historical analysis of the movements’ evolution through a cross-national analysis of movement differences. We draw on concepts from the social movement and intersectionality literature. Historically, the two movements have been propelled by multiple streams of activism corresponding to shifting salient intersectional identities and frames, always including gender but incorporating other elements as well. Comparatively, the US domestic-worker movement recently has had greater success due to superior financial resources and more facilitative political opportunities – advantages due in part precisely to intersectional identities resonant with potential allies. However, this relative advantage was not always present and may not persist. Social movement concepts and intersectional analysis thus help understand both historical changes and cross-national contrasts in informal-worker organizing.

Details

Gendering Struggles against Informal and Precarious Work
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-368-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2010

C. Clifford Defee, Theodore P. (Ted) Stank and Terry Esper

The purpose of this paper is to develop the concepts of supply chain leadership (SCL) and supply chain followership (SCF) from the literature, and propose a theory of…

4115

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop the concepts of supply chain leadership (SCL) and supply chain followership (SCF) from the literature, and propose a theory of leadership in supply chains using a strategy‐structure‐performance theory framework.

Design/methodology/approach

Constructs are defined and valid and reliable scales are developed for SCL, SCF, and three structural elements (information availability, communication, and rewards). Proposed SCL and SCF theoretical relationships are tested using data collected from an interactive simulation and analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Transformational SCL and SCF are inter‐related constructs that can be linked to the creation of the three forms of supply chain structure examined in this research to varying degrees. A finding of significance is that supply chain follower organizations may actually have greater influence over operational performance than the supply chain leader.

Research limitations/implications

This research presents an initial test of supply chain‐related constructs not tested in previous research. These represent significant organizational constructs that may benefit future supply chain research efforts.

Practical implications

Transformational supply chain behaviors of leaders and followers can be perceived and measured. Managers may utilize this knowledge to better understand the type of supply chain relationships their organization should most effectively pursue.

Originality/value

The paper introduces the concepts of SCL and SCF and empirically tests these concepts and the structural constructs of information availability, communication, and rewards.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 40 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 September 2009

Wesley S. Randall and M. Theodore Farris

The purpose of this paper is to show how firm financial management techniques may be used to improve over all supply chain profitability and performance.

11449

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how firm financial management techniques may be used to improve over all supply chain profitability and performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a case‐based approach to demonstrate how supply chain financial management techniques, such as cash‐to‐cash and shared weighted average cost of capital (WACC), can reduce the financial costs experience by a supply chain.

Findings

This paper provides a methodology to identify and quantify the potential opportunities to increase profitability throughout the supply. Scenarios are offered that illuminate potential supply chain improvements gained by collaborative management of cash‐to‐cash cycles and sharing WACC with trading partners.

Research limitations/implications

These financial techniques are readily available for use in collaborative supply chain structures.

Practical implications

Coordinating financial management across the supply chain is a potential tool to align and improve the financial performance of collaborating firms. This method extends to the supply chain those historically firm‐centric financial management concepts such as return on capital and cash flow. The impact is reduced overall cost generated by leveraging the financial strength of the entire supply chain. During economic downturns and times of tight credit proactively managing financials across the supply chain may be the only way some suppliers remain afloat.

Originality/value

Two firm level financial management approaches are extended and they are adopted for use across the supply chain: cash‐to‐cash management; and leveraging a shared supply chain financing rate. This paper builds on the increasing body of research and practice that suggests trading firm‐optimized for supply chain optimized performance reduces overall cost and improves customer value.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 39 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 9 July 2010

Thomas C. Powell, Noushi Rahman and William H. Starbuck

This chapter explores the origins of the theme of competitive advantage in 19th and early 20th century economics. This theme, which forms the core of modern Strategic…

Abstract

This chapter explores the origins of the theme of competitive advantage in 19th and early 20th century economics. This theme, which forms the core of modern Strategic Management, was a battleground for debates about the value of abstract theory versus observations about real-life events. Intellectual genealogies, citations, and other sources show the central roles played by the University of Vienna and Harvard University. These two institutions strongly influenced the theory of monopolistic competition as well as all three modern views of competitive advantage – the industrial as expressed by Porter, the resource-based as expressed by Penrose, and the evolutionary as expressed by Schumpeter.

Details

The Globalization of Strategy Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-898-8

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1992

Terrance L. Pohlen and M. Theodore Farris

Recycling has experienced rapid growth as a technique to reduce thesolid waste stream volume. Despite the public appeal and acceptance ofrecycling, the reverse logistics…

4658

Abstract

Recycling has experienced rapid growth as a technique to reduce the solid waste stream volume. Despite the public appeal and acceptance of recycling, the reverse logistics channels used in recycling have received minimal attention. However, the reverse channels′ membership and capabilities have a significant impact on the efficiency of processing recyclable material for remanufacture into recycled products. Differing product characteristics, extensive handling, and low density shipments pose considerable obstacles to establishing an efficient reverse channel for recyclable commodities. A framework, based on interviews and current literature, describes the reverse logistics channel structure, membership and functions, and provides a foundation for identifying the issues affecting efficiency and marketability, and possible future directions for improving efficiency within the reverse channel structure.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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