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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

John Earl

The writer draws on personal experience to suggest that theatres, as a building type, are particularly vulnerable to ill‐advised alteration. He describes the peculiarities…

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Abstract

The writer draws on personal experience to suggest that theatres, as a building type, are particularly vulnerable to ill‐advised alteration. He describes the peculiarities of design and construction which distinguish theatres from other types of public buildings and sets out a number of ways in which theatre operation can be damaged or even destroyed by seemingly unimportant interventions. The role of the Theatres Trust in protecting theatres not currently in use as such is detailed and justified, pointing out that many theatres have, in recent years, been returned to their designed use after decades in other employment. The importance, in this context (and having regard to modern theatre economics), of low‐cost reversibility is emphasised. Finally, comments drily on the psychology of theatre operators and theatre purchasers.

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Structural Survey, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Book part
Publication date: 15 December 2016

Hui Soo Chae, Laura Costello and Gary Natriello

This chapter discusses the Learning Theater, a flexible library space that permits substantial patron involvement in designing dynamic environments to meet diverse learning goals.

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter discusses the Learning Theater, a flexible library space that permits substantial patron involvement in designing dynamic environments to meet diverse learning goals.

Methodology/approach

We use a case study method to describe and discuss the Learning Theater.

Findings

We found that many challenges associated with designing and building a radically different library space to support patron learning goals can be resolved by eliciting patron input in all phases of the process.

Practical implications

We offer three lessons for other libraries intent on developing dramatically new kinds of library spaces: engage the community of users early and throughout, new spaces require robust communications to convey the possible set of uses to the community, and a flexible infrastructure and a responsive staff are key to meeting demands for unanticipated uses.

Originality/value

Our experience in developing the Learning Theater as part of the library education program suggests that libraries can share greater control of new flexible facilities and partner in the creation of intellectual properties to make best use of those facilities in more powerful ways than has typically been done in the past.

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Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2018

David M. Boje and Mike Bonifer

This chapter is about quantum storytelling and improvisation and how to use quantum storytelling as an improv theater for social change. Quantum storytelling, in its…

Abstract

This chapter is about quantum storytelling and improvisation and how to use quantum storytelling as an improv theater for social change. Quantum storytelling, in its fore-caring, is about producing an ethics of care where none exists. In the quantum storytelling theater for change, we envision a stage with human and non-human actors (animals, plants, quantum wave/particles) and ways to collapse waves of quantum potentiality into new possibilities for human survival, for posthumanist survival.

We will assert that this happens through improvisation: something called “quantum storytelling with improv.” Our example for this chapter is a theater company we created in Las Cruces, NM, called “Veterans Theater” in which improv is the performance approach. Boje teaches in the belly of the beast (the Business College) at New Mexico State University, a course called “Leadership Is Theater in Society” that uses improv. It is not only about improv but it is also based on Theater of the Oppressed (Boal, 1979, 2002) and Improvisation for the Theater (Spolin, 1983); it also draws from Pedagogy of the Oppressed (Freire, 1970) and Rules for Radicals (Alinsky, 1971), both of which call on improv as a process for social change. Improv is a vital leadership skill in complex polycultural systems, which is the future of business. Leadership theory is dead. Get over it! Or, resurrect it with improv!

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The Emerald Handbook of Quantum Storytelling Consulting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-671-0

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Grassroots Leadership and the Arts for Social Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-687-1

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Book part
Publication date: 26 October 2005

Peggy Placier, Suzanne Burgoyne, Karen Cockrell, Sharon Welch and Helen Neville

In this account of a study of a Theatre of the Oppressed (TO) intervention in a preservice teacher classroom, the authors explore an alternative way of learning to teach…

Abstract

In this account of a study of a Theatre of the Oppressed (TO) intervention in a preservice teacher classroom, the authors explore an alternative way of learning to teach, as well as the dynamics of interdisciplinary collaboration between Theater and Education. Measures of racial and political attitudes did not demonstrate any change in the preservice teachers; however, several limitations made these findings inconclusive. Observations and journal entries suggested that interactive theater may be a promising way to make beliefs about teaching and learning visible, and therefore accessible for critical reflection.

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Learning from Research on Teaching: Perspective, Methodology, and Representation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-254-2

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Book part
Publication date: 24 November 2010

MaryBeth Meszaros

While holistic studies devoted to the information behavior of humanist scholars have begun to appear more frequently in the literature, there has been, until quite…

Abstract

While holistic studies devoted to the information behavior of humanist scholars have begun to appear more frequently in the literature, there has been, until quite recently, a persistent tendency to consolidate humanists rather than attend to the variant gestalts, material working conditions, and values that might distinguish one from another. This chapter is a response to recent calls for more finely granulated descriptions of specific humanist disciplinary practices. It offers a close examination of the information behavior of theatre researchers, both academics and practitioners. For reasons that the chapter explores, theatre researchers constitute a user group that has been profoundly neglected. Using both quantitative and qualitative data obtained through a survey of listserv members of the American Society for Theatrical Research and the Theatre Library Association, the chapter examines the impact of theatre culture on theatre research practices. Moreover, inspired by Brenda Dervin's “Sense-Making Methodology,” this chapter offers the embedded perspective of a researcher who is herself a theatre scholar as well as a practicing librarian. The chapter ranges widely, illustrating its findings with, for example, published rehearsal memoirs, statistics from the U.S. Bureau of Labor, white papers produced by the National Endowment of the Arts, performance theory texts. Topics covered include the history of theatre studies as an academic discipline, the multiple job-holding/unemployment culture of practitioners such as actors and directors, the differences in focus and methodology that distinguish practitioners from scholars, the marginalized status of dramatic literature in university English departments. Several themes that emerged through analysis of qualitative data are discussed: the contrast between scholarly rigor and the tendency of the practitioner to “satisfice,” the conflicting claims of text and artifact, the impact of geography and teaching-intensive institutional affiliation on researchers’ access to resources. The author concludes that it is not only inadvisable and inaccurate to generalize behaviors across humanistic disciplines; it is equally inaccurate to assume that all researchers within the same discipline will manifest the same characteristics, or even that the same researcher will apply the same strategies to all projects. The only generalization about the information behavior of the theatre researcher that can be made is that it is highly task and context dependent.

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Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-287-7

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Theatre
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-336-9

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Theatre
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-336-9

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2020

Priscila H.F. Chu

Collaborative arts incorporate theatrical elements including sound, movement, text, design, technology and visual elements into a synthetic original form of art. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Collaborative arts incorporate theatrical elements including sound, movement, text, design, technology and visual elements into a synthetic original form of art. This paper examines a sub-category of collaborative arts, New Music Theater, in the contemporary context from the 1980s onwards in Hong Kong.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews with artists Kung Chi Shing, Steve Hui and Amy Chan exhibit their personal creative and collaborative experiences.

Findings

These interviews provide a view of the current practice of New Music Theater in Hong Kong.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the emergence of a new art form in Hong Kong and fills a gap in the relevant literature.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2021

Chia-Yi Cheng and Shang-Ying Chen

This study aims to investigate hazards in theater venues on the performance day by combining operational risk theory with a service blueprint method.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate hazards in theater venues on the performance day by combining operational risk theory with a service blueprint method.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews and Delphi method are applied to find the hazards, then a survey and ANOVA are followed. The study explores a profile of hazards using data from theater venues in Taiwan and examines whether employee characteristics (i.e. professional tasks, experience and working location) affect risk perception.

Findings

The study suggests a new framework represented by a 5 (types of loss events) × 6 (service systems) matrix to check operational risks. The analyses indicate two types of hazards: risk perception about performance and operations by performers and crew (RPPOPC) and audience behaviors and safety (RPABS). RPPOPC is related to the core show, but not all employees possess high RPPOPC. Seniors have relatively low RPPOPC, and frontend house employees possess insufficient RPABS. Further, front house employees, seniors and those working in municipal cities show relatively high RPPOPC in high-loss situations.

Practical implications

Managers can use the analytic framework to effectively identify operational risks in the core show operations and audience service offerings. They can promote risk perception considering employee differences and loss severity. However, the framework does not discuss the cause-and-effect relationship. Incorporating a large amount of loss experience into a risk information system would help clarify this complex relationship.

Originality/value

This study contributes to hazard mitigation in the performing arts sector, both in the peripheral services for customers and in the core show services.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

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