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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Ken Robertson

Introduces the concept of work transformation, the integration of people, space and technology with a direct focus on delivering business value both operationally and…

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Abstract

Introduces the concept of work transformation, the integration of people, space and technology with a direct focus on delivering business value both operationally and strategically. Work transformation requires questioning the way we work, where we work, and the environment in which we work. The ultimate goal of work transformation is to help organizations break out of their traditional definition of work and move forward to an environment that is more flexible, empowering, communicative and pleasing. Work transformation represents the opportunity for facilities groups to have a key strategic role in supporting the constantly changing marketplace and to deliver real strategic business value to the organization. Work transformation is based on facilities management, human resources and information technology all working together to develop more creative ways of handling space in terms of the “real” office and the quickly growing "virtual" office. Based on the author’s book Work Transformation: Planning and Implementing the New Workplace.

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Facilities, vol. 18 no. 10/11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2020

Lisa Nagel

This study investigates whether the COVID-19 pandemic has led to an acceleration of the digital transformation in the workplace.

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5292

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates whether the COVID-19 pandemic has led to an acceleration of the digital transformation in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on a survey conducted during the COVID-19 pandemic from March to April 2020 on the crowdsourcing platform Amazon Mechanical Turk.

Findings

The findings show an increase of people working from home offices and that many people believe that digital transformation of work has accelerated in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. People who noted this acceleration can imagine working digitally exclusively in the future. Moreover, the importance of traditional jobs as a secure source of income has decreased, and digital forms of work as a secure source of income have increased because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Workers believe that digital work will play a more important role as a secure source of income in the future than traditional jobs.

Research limitations/implications

Because the survey was conducted online, respondents may have had a certain affinity for digital work.

Originality/value

This study assesses the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic on the future of work, showing that changes in the perception of digital transformation and the willingness to work exclusively in a digital manner have arisen as result of the COVID-19 pandemic. To estimate the long-term consequences of the pandemic on the digitisation of work, research that includes macroeconomic consequences in its forecast is necessary.

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International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 40 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2020

Olga Kozlowska, Gemma Seda Gombau and Rustam Rea

Integration of health services involves multiple interdependent leaders acting at several levels of their organisation and across organisations. This paper aims to explore…

Abstract

Purpose

Integration of health services involves multiple interdependent leaders acting at several levels of their organisation and across organisations. This paper aims to explore the complexities of leadership in an integrated care project and aims to understand what leadership arrangements are needed to enable service transformation.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study analysed system and organisational leadership in a project aiming to integrate primary and specialist care. To explore the former, the national policy documents and guidelines were reviewed. To explore the latter, the official documents from the transformation team meetings and interview data from 17 health-care professionals and commissioners were analysed using thematic analysis with the coding framework derived from the comprehensive and multilevel framework for change (Ferlie and Shortell, 2001).

Findings

Although integration was supported in the narratives of the system and organisational leaders, there were multiple challenges: insufficient support by the system level leadership for the local leadership, insufficient organisational support for (clinical) leadership within the transformation team and insufficient leadership within the transformation team because of disruptions caused by personnel changes, roles ambiguity, conflicting priorities and insufficient resources.

Practical implications

This study provides insights into the interdependencies of leadership across multiple levels and proposes steps to maximise the success of complex transformational projects.

Originality/value

This study’s practical findings are useful for those involved in the bottom-up integrated projects, especially the transformation teams’ members. The case study highlights the need for a toolkit enabling local leaders to operate effectively within the system and organisational leadership contexts.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2021

Andrea Geissinger, Christofer Laurell, Christina Öberg, Christian Sandström and Yuliani Suseno

This article explores the various stakeholders' perceptions of the ways digital work is organised within the sharing economy and the social implications of the

Abstract

Purpose

This article explores the various stakeholders' perceptions of the ways digital work is organised within the sharing economy and the social implications of the transformation of work.

Design/methodology/approach

Applying social media analytics (SMA) concerning the sharing economy platform Foodora, a total of 3,251 user-generated content was collected and organised throughout the social media landscape in Sweden over 12 months, and 18 stakeholder groups were identified, discussing digital work within seven thematic categories.

Findings

The results show that the stakeholder groups in the Swedish context primarily expressed negative views of Foodora's way of organising digital work. The social media posts outlined the distributive and procedural justice related to the working conditions, boycott and protests and critical incidents, as well as the collective bargaining of Foodora.

Originality/value

By utilising a novel SMA method, this study contributes to the extant literature on the sharing economy by providing a systematic assessment concerning the impact of the sharing economy platform on the transformation of work and the associated social consequences.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2007

Tahar Bellal and Ouafa Saighi

This study is addressing the widespread transformation activities made to government-built housing intended for low income urban households. These unauthorised self-help…

Abstract

This study is addressing the widespread transformation activities made to government-built housing intended for low income urban households. These unauthorised self-help transformation activities indicate not only people's willingness to become actively involved in the housing process but also demonstrate the potential for low income families to invest to improve their living conditions. In this paper we examine the changes made to the internal layouts of multi-story walk-up flats in the recently implemented satellite town of "Ali Mendjeli" in Constantine which is one of the newly adopted solutions to ease Constantine saturated city centre, and also to respond to an acute housing shortage. These transformation activities have an effect on dwelling size, cultural norms, and internal maintenance. A survey has been conducted in selected projects and socio-economic data has been collected from a sample of dwellings. The findings of the study point to the factors, which encourage these transformations, help to understand the motives and means used by the residents in the transformation procedure, find out the characteristics of these transformations, and assess means, which can be used to plan for future transformations in proposed housing schemes. Thus, this paper tends to understand the alterations carried out by the users, and to propose recommendations in order to attenuate this phenomenon.

Details

Open House International, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2018

Eskil Ekstedt

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate and problematize how the expansion of project and temporary work challenges the traditional industrial work organization and its…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate and problematize how the expansion of project and temporary work challenges the traditional industrial work organization and its internal and supportive institutions. It highlights the transformation dilemma, which occurs when traditional industrial institutions are confronted by project organizations. It also discusses how one may prepare to meet these challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

The long-run incremental changes in organizational structures of the economy are described in an economic historical context, focusing on the organizational form of work and the employment regimes. Challenges, at the societal, organizational and individual levels, related to the “projectification” process are illustrated in considering the case of Sweden.

Findings

Project dense industries, like media, entertainment and consultancy, are growing faster than the rest of the economy. The share of project work in permanent organizations is increasing. More than a third of all working hours in industrialized countries, like Germany, was labeled as project work in 2013. This transformation challenges basic conditions for how work is designed and regulated, like the stipulated and uniform work time or the permanent and stable work place. Central institutions of today, like the labor law and the educational system, are challenged.

Social implications

“Projectification” challenges traditional conditions of work and work life institutions and organizations, like the social partners, the educational and law systems.

Originality/value

The paper brings together and problematizes several aspects of “projectification” of work life. It highlights what kind of challenges work and work-related institutions meet and discusses how to handle some of them, like education.

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Article
Publication date: 22 October 2020

Dilek Cetindamar Kozanoglu and Babak Abedin

Much of recent academic and professional interest in exploring digital transformation and enterprise systems has focused on the technology or the organizations' external…

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1555

Abstract

Purpose

Much of recent academic and professional interest in exploring digital transformation and enterprise systems has focused on the technology or the organizations' external forces, leaving internal factors, in particular employees, overlooked. The purpose of this paper is to explore digital literacy of employees as an organizational affordance to capture contextual factors within which digital technologies are situated and are used.

Design/methodology/approach

We used the evidence-based practice for information systems approach, and undertook a systematic literature review of 30 papers coupled with brainstorming with 11 professional experts on the neglected topic of digital literacy and its assessment.

Findings

This paper draws upon affordance theory, and develops a novel framework for conceptualization of digital literacy of employees as an organizational affordance. We do this by distinguishing digital literacy at the individual level and organizational level, and by assessing digital literacy through Information/Cognitive and Social Practice/Articulation affordances.

Research limitations/implications

The current paper contributes to the notion of organizational affordances by examining the effect of interactions between employee-technology through digital literacy of employees in using digital technologies. We offer a novel conceptualization of digital literacy to improve understanding of the role of employee in digital transformation and utilization of enterprise systems. Thus, our definition of digital literacy offers an extension to the recent discussions in the IS literature regarding the actualization of affordances by bringing a lens of employees into the process.

Practical implications

This paper operationalizes digital literacy at organizational and individual levels, and offers managers a high-level tool to assess digital literacy of their employees. By doing so, managers can achieve the fit between employees' capabilities and digital technologies that will improve affordance actualization and support their digital transformation initiatives.

Originality/value

The study is one of early attempts to apply and extend affordance theory on digital literacy at organizational level by not limiting the concept to the individual level. The proposed framework improves the communication among researchers and between researchers and practitioners.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Jingfu Lu and Min Li

The purpose of this paper is to understand the boundary-spanning behaviors of Party organizations, and the processes and constraints of these behaviors in controlling…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the boundary-spanning behaviors of Party organizations, and the processes and constraints of these behaviors in controlling worker unrest in Chinese resource-based state-owned enterprises in the “new work-unit system” using boundary-spanning theory.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study was carried out in a resource-based state-owned enterprise in the “new work-unit system” in China. The research utilized interviews and archival documents, and then coded and analyzed the data using NVivo.

Findings

In China, Party organizations’ boundary-spanning behaviors (PBSBs) in labor relations management are identified, and classified into the behaviors of the ambassador, task coordinator, and scout. Worker unrest can be controlled by these behaviors through the mediation effect of the behaviors of agents in the “new work-unit system” but can also be provoked in the transformation of the “new work-unit system.”

Originality/value

The Communist Party plays a key role in labor relations management in China’s SOEs; however, this role has not been explored in any depth. This study builds a model to reveal the “black box” in which the PBSBs influence the agents’ behaviors and how the agents’ behaviors then influence the workers, and in this way control worker unrest.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Book part
Publication date: 22 July 2005

Claudia Bettiol

This chapter examines the fourth kind of intangible capital, which is the capability to transform a heterogeneous aggregate of people, first into a group and then into a…

Abstract

This chapter examines the fourth kind of intangible capital, which is the capability to transform a heterogeneous aggregate of people, first into a group and then into a team. This is useful both on a macro- and micro-scale. This is shown through the case of people involved in an urban transformation with its endogenous and exogenous complexities. Following the definition of sustainability, people can be divided into three different kinds that use language differently to be understood. Communication happens only on each personal boundary line, which is dynamic, and acts on two levels: the technical and the relational. The presence of a connector, mediator, translator, and negotiator, who has both human and technical training, is essential.

Details

Collaborative Capital: Creating Intangible Value
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-222-1

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Abstract

Details

Maturing Leadership: How Adult Development Impacts Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-402-7

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