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1 – 10 of over 10000
Expert briefing
Publication date: 16 June 2015

The outlook for the growing Japan-Philippines defence partnership.

Expert briefing
Publication date: 5 February 2016

The Philippines-US Enhanced Defense Cooperation Agreement.

Book part
Publication date: 21 July 2011

Jon S.T. Quah

In his March 1986 article in Newsweek, Russell Watson exposed “Queen Imelda” Marcos's life of indulgence as the Philippines' First Lady in the opening paragraph:Three…

Abstract

In his March 1986 article in Newsweek, Russell Watson exposed “Queen Imelda” Marcos's life of indulgence as the Philippines' First Lady in the opening paragraph:Three thousand pairs of shoes, size eight and a half. Five shelves of unused Gucci handbags, still stuffed with paper, price tags still attached. Five hundred bras, mostly black, and a trunk full of girdles, 40 and 42 inches around the hips. Huge bottles of perfume, vats of Christian Dior wrinkle cream, a walk-in-safe littered with dozens of empty jewelry cases. When the palace of Ferdinand and Imelda Marcos was opened to the public as a museum last week, foreigners and Filipinos alike gawked at what the former First Lady had left behind. “It was the worst case of conspicuous consumption I have ever seen,” said an American visitor, Rep. Stephen Solarz. “Compared to her, Marie Antoinette was a bag lady.” (Watson, 1986, p. 14)

Details

Curbing Corruption in Asian Countries: An Impossible Dream?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-819-0

Abstract

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Middle-Power Responses to China’s BRI and America’s Indo-Pacific Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-023-9

Abstract

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Hyogo Framework for Action and Urban Disaster Resilience
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-927-0

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2021

Peter Jerome B. Del Rosario, Francesca Mitchel Ofilada and Rose Ann D. Vicente

This paper analyzed the healthcare systems of the Philippines and Vietnam prior to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and their strategies on mass testing, contact…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper analyzed the healthcare systems of the Philippines and Vietnam prior to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and their strategies on mass testing, contact tracing, quarantine procedures and information dissemination about the pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

Steinmo's (2008) historical institutionalism approach was used in this paper. Secondary data gathering, document analysis and comparative process tracing were employed.

Findings

The findings revealed that Vietnam's implementation of its Law on Prevention and Control of Infectious Diseases in 2007, its relatively low-cost healthcare system, its efficient mass testing and contact tracing strategies and its science-based decisions are contributory to its success in handling the pandemic. Meanwhile, the Philippines failure to enact its Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Act in 2013, its costly and dominantly private healthcare system, its heavy focus on strict, long lockdowns and its militarist methods to control the spread of the pandemic were found to be insufficient.

Research limitations/implications

Detailed study on the delivery of healthcare services in marginal areas, healthcare spending for COVID-19 positive individuals and information dissemination strategies about the pandemic were not explored.

Practical implications

Health institutions can redesign their governance mechanisms by ensuring a cost-effective healthcare system and maximizing resource utilization to ensure efficient management of future pandemics. Moreover, national governments should not compromise their country's healthcare system over the economy during a pandemic.

Originality/value

This paper analyzed the countries' history of healthcare governance and its influence in handling COVID-19 compared to previous studies which only focused on the countries' strategies during the pandemic.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2020

Liladhar R. Pendse

The access to the rare originals of the early Spanish colonial imprints of the Philippines remains problematic. The reference librarians often are restricted to directing…

Abstract

Purpose

The access to the rare originals of the early Spanish colonial imprints of the Philippines remains problematic. The reference librarians often are restricted to directing the students and scholars to the secondary resources that are available both in print and as a part of the digital assets within the North American academic libraries. This paper aims to focus on the select primary source editions including select Spanish language colonial imprints that are available electronically on the Web along the Open Access. These Web-based resources serve as the reference tools for the early history of the Philippines and Southeast Asia. As many of these publications are rare and extremely expensive for most libraries, the Open Access resources serve as an aid to building a virtual collection of these items.

Design/methodology/approach

The author had to create a data set of the early imprints of the Spanish Philippines using several bibliographic resources. The data set will be submitted as an Appendix for this research paper. The author did both qualitative and quantitative analysis of the data set along with the voyant-based digital humanities approach for topic modeling.

Findings

The goals of this paper were to not only survey the early Spanish printing of the Philippines but also provide the reader with a somewhat complete picture of how the printing began in the Spanish Philippines, what kind of the first books were printed and how one can access them given their rarity and fragility. The collection building paradigms are undergoing significant shifts, and the focus of many academic libraries is shifting toward providing access to these items. As these items high-value low-use items continue to be part of the Special Collections, the access to these is problematic. The virtual collections thus serve as a viable alternative that enables further research and access. While the creators of these works are long gone, the legacy of the Spanish colonial domination, printing and the religious orders in the Philippines remain alive through these works.

Research limitations/implications

As this is an introductory paper, the author focused on the critical editions rather than providing a comprehensive bibliographic landscape of the presses that produced these editions. He also did not take into consideration many pamphlets that were published in the same period. He also did not consider the Chinese language publications of the Islands. The Chinese had been block printing since medieval times (Little, 1996). In the context of the Spanish Philippines, the Chinese migration and trade have been studied in detail by Chia (2006), Bjork (1998) and Gebhardt (2017). The scope of this paper also was centered toward building a virtual collection of these rare books.

Practical implications

Rare books are often expensive and out-of-reach for many libraries; the virtual collection of the same along the Open Access model represents an alternative to collect and curate these collections. The stewardship of these collections also acquires a new meaning in the digital milieu.

Social implications

This research paper will allow scholars to see past the analog editions and help them focus on curating a virtual collection. The questions of electronic access are often ignored when it comes to visiting and using them in a controlled environment of the reading room in the Special Collections. The author argues that one way to enable access to these rare and expensive books is to provide access to their digital counterparts. These digital/virtual surrogates of the originals will facilitate further research.

Originality/value

The author could not find similar research on the publications of the early Spanish colony of the Philippines.

Details

Collection and Curation, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9326

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1996

D.A. Reisman

The Republic of the Philippines is seeking to expand access to the formal sector of medical care. Concentrates on the alternative ways in which that expansion can be…

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Abstract

The Republic of the Philippines is seeking to expand access to the formal sector of medical care. Concentrates on the alternative ways in which that expansion can be financed. First, provides the background by presenting data on mortality and morbidity as indicators of health status, and of manpower and institutions as measures of care inputs. Second, examines private payment, concentrating on family resources, community co‐operatives, private insurance and employer provided services. Third, considers direct provision and national health insurance, which are the principal modes of public payment for care. Makes recommendations about the financing of health care and the mixed health economy that are of relevance in developed and less‐developed countries alike.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 23 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 July 2013

David Seth Jones

The purpose of the paper is to examine features and impact of recent reforms introduced by the Philippines government to deal with the longstanding shortcomings in its…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to examine features and impact of recent reforms introduced by the Philippines government to deal with the longstanding shortcomings in its procurement system.

Design/methodology/approach

The research for the paper is based on reports by international organizations, official documents of the Philippines government, surveys by international and domestic organizations, interviews with relevant officials and media reports.

Findings

The findings show that the reforms have focused on fostering competition, increasing transparency, standardizing procedures, enhancing end‐product quality and contractor reliability, ensuring proper planning and budgeting, combatting corruption, and strengthening accountability. These reforms were intended to create a procurement system more in line with international best practices. However the paper shows that the impact has been less than promised. This is due to limitations of certain provisions of the reforms and weaknesses in both implementation and in the accountability of the procuring entities. A key factor in undermining the reforms is widespread corruption, which continues to affect many aspects of the procurement system. The article identifies two important and related reasons for such failings: elite capture of the government and bureaucracy by a powerful network of business leaders from well‐established landed families, who have close links with the political establishment; and second, a long‐established culture of informal influence in the Philippine state bureaucracy (what may be termed the informal bureaucracy), which has been used to maximum effect by the elite network of business leaders. As a result, this network has been able to influence the reforms to serve its own interests and ensure its continued dominance of the procurement market.

Originality/value

The value of the paper is to show how administrative reforms, no matter how well formulated they are, may be readily undermined in the process of implementation by elite groups able to influence government bureaucracy through an informal culture.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Joseph Marmol Yap and Agnes Sambalilo Barsaga

Oral histories (OHs), as primary sources of information, are used as evidences of the past and inculcate human memory. It is a real testimony of our history. However, OHs…

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Abstract

Purpose

Oral histories (OHs), as primary sources of information, are used as evidences of the past and inculcate human memory. It is a real testimony of our history. However, OHs are now neglected and somehow unpopular. Strategies must be done to make sure that OH projects should continue to be used as proofs. The purpose of this paper is to go back in time and review the OH in Asia, in the Philippines, and the collection at De La Salle University.

Design/methodology/approach

This study explores the OH collection of the DLSU Archives. Data are extracted from the Sierra library system. Extracted subjects are arranged alphabetically. They are presented and summarized below. Historical data coming from the correspondences kept at the archives are also used to understand how the collection accumulated and how they are being organized, classified, and used by the patrons. Literature reviews are also consulted to learn more about the background of OH in the Philippines.

Findings

A total of 176 subjects are identified. These subjects are selected on the basis of the Library of Congress Classification Scheme which is re-categorized according to the Philippine Standard Industrial Classification to identify which type of industry does each OH belong to. The category on professional, scientific and technical activities had 30 LCC-related subjects or 16.95 percent of the total number of subjects, next is 15.25 percent or 27 LCC-related subjects which comes from the arts, entertainment and recreation, and top three is Public Administration and Defense; Compulsory Security with 10.23 percent.

Research limitations/implications

This paper shares the challenges and experiences of establishing and maintaining OHs.

Practical implications

The paper presents new ways or initiatives to capture OH other than the traditional and usual process.

Social implications

Oral interviews are given proper attention as part of the local history.

Originality/value

There is a scarcity of OH papers written by librarians; therefore, this paper presents the current status of OH in the country.

Details

Library Management, vol. 39 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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