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Article

Gillian Windle, Rhiannon Edwards and Vanessa Burholt

Researchers have a wide range of tools for health assessments to choose from, some of which can be lengthy and time consuming. The purpose of this paper is to examine a…

Abstract

Researchers have a wide range of tools for health assessments to choose from, some of which can be lengthy and time consuming. The purpose of this paper is to examine a potentially shorter alternative, the EQ‐5D instrument, with a community dwelling population sample of older people. Data was obtained using trained interviewers from a randomly sampled crosssectional survey of community dwelling older people. 423 people aged 70‐99 were interviewed. Information was obtained relating to activities of daily living, the EQ‐5D, the EQ‐VAS, the SF‐36, use of health and social care services and the presence or absence of a limiting illness, disability or infirmity. In terms of construct validity, the EQ‐5D was able to distinguish between hypoThesised differences in the sample that could be expected to reflect differences in health‐related quality of life. The EQ‐5D items correlated well with conceptually similar items. Completion rates for the EQ‐5D items were good, ranging from 98.3‐98.8%. Completion rates for the EQ‐VAS were 98.1%. The results suggest that the EQ‐ 5D may provide a valid measure of health‐related quality of life in a cross‐sectional population sample of older adults, although the emphasis of the scale is very much on physical health and functioning. The results for the depression/anxiety item suggest that additional information may be needed if mental health is of concern.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article

Tina Eriksson‐Sjöö, Margareta Cederberg, Margareta Östman and Solvig Ekblad

This study aims to illuminate self‐perceived health‐related quality of life (HRQoL) among newly‐arrived Arabic‐speaking refugees in Malmö, Sweden participating in a…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to illuminate self‐perceived health‐related quality of life (HRQoL) among newly‐arrived Arabic‐speaking refugees in Malmö, Sweden participating in a specific group Health Promotion activity.

Design/methodology/approach

Data consist of questionnaires, observations and oral evaluations in groups. Questions about HRQoL was measured by EQ‐5D self‐assessment containing five dimensions and three response options of severity, including a visual analog health rating scale. Participants' sleep patterns were measured by a sleep and recovery questionnaire with questions about sleep quality and sleep quantity.

Findings

The results show that disturbed sleep relates to EQ‐5D variables and to health rating scores. Moreover, there are changes over time and participants' perceptions of their health and quality of life in most EQ‐5D variables have significantly increased after the end of activity. In the variables pain and depression an improvement remains even at second follow up and health rating scores are higher at both follow ups relative to what it was originally. Sleep and recovery problems were perceived as less difficult at the course completion and second follow up.

Research limitations/implications

Because of practical and ethical reasons there is an absence of a control group in this study.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for education in medicine, health care and social work, for the design of the refugee reception programs and for the inter‐professional collaborations.

Originality/value

The paper shows that health promotion interventions in group setting in the first stage of resettlement turn out to be useful according to HRQoL and knowledge of the health care system.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Article

Jacqueline Doumit and Ramzi Nasser

The purpose of this paper is to assess quality of life in relation to wellbeing among Lebanese nursing home elderly residents. The study attempts to understand the impact…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess quality of life in relation to wellbeing among Lebanese nursing home elderly residents. The study attempts to understand the impact of structures, processes and skills on elderly health status.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, 220 normally functioning elderly respondents from 33 nursing homes were studied. A quasi‐experimental approach measured psychological and health‐related factors using the Geriatric Depression Scale, Activity of Daily Living, EuroQol EQ‐5D and the Mini‐Nutritional Assessment (MNA) instruments.

Findings

A relatively high level of mild depression among elderly residents and a lack of mobility were found. Generally, normally functioning elderly residents were well nourished and had moderate daily activity levels.

Originality/value

The study is original in the sense that it assesses elderly residents' psychological and physical health status in relation to institutional structures, processes, and skills.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article

Hannah L. Thompson, Marie-Claire Reville, Anna Price, Laura Reynolds, Lauren Rodgers and Tamsin Ford

There is a lack of valid and reliable generic measures of Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) for children under eight. The purpose of this paper is to assess the

Abstract

Purpose

There is a lack of valid and reliable generic measures of Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) for children under eight. The purpose of this paper is to assess the psychometric properties of the newly formulated Quality of Life Scale for Children (QoL-C), which uses a pictorial response format.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 335 primary school children completed the QoL-C on two occasions, two weeks apart. Children aged four to seven were interviewed one-to-one while children aged eight to nine completed the measure as a class activity. Test-re-test reliability, convergent validity and child-parent concordance were assessed.

Findings

Only one child refused to complete the QoL-C, which suggests the measure is user-friendly. Test-re-test reliability was moderate for the measure's total score (intraclass correlation coefficient =0.48, 95 percent CI 0.39, 0.57) but low to fair for individual items (K from 0.13 to 0.37). Internal consistency was moderate (α=0.42 time one, 0.53 time two). A small significant correlation was found between the QoL-C and Child Health Meter in the expected direction (r=−0.32), suggesting convergent validity. There was low concordance between the children's QoL-C responses and parent's responses (r=0.19) to a parallel measure.

Research limitations/implications

The results suggest that further development of this measure is needed. However, the findings indicate that one-to-one support increases the reliability of very young children's responses. The use of pictures, emoticons and minimal text used in the QoL-C should be investigated further.

Originality/value

Low parent-child concordance underscores the importance of younger children getting the opportunity to share their views about their HRQoL.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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Article

Jantine Voordouw, Margaret Fox, Judith Cornelisse‐Vermaat, Gerrit Antonides, Miranda Mugford and Lynn Frewer

Food allergy has potential to affect direct, indirect and intangible economic costs experienced by food allergic individuals and their families, resulting in negative…

Abstract

Purpose

Food allergy has potential to affect direct, indirect and intangible economic costs experienced by food allergic individuals and their families, resulting in negative impacts on welfare and well‐being. The purpose of this paper is to develop an instrument to assess these economic costs of food allergy at household level and to conduct an exploratory analysis of potential economic impact.

Design/methodology/approach

A case‐controlled postal pilot survey was conducted using a self‐completion instrument. Cases had either clinically or self‐diagnosed food allergy. Controls were obtained from households in which none of the members had food allergies.

Findings

The instrument appeared sensitive to the economic cost differences between households with and without food allergic members. Direct costs of health care were significantly higher for cases than for controls. Similar differences were identified for indirect cost of lost earnings, and costs due to inability to perform domestic tasks because of ill health. Intangible costs (self‐reported health status and well‐being), indicated significantly lower subjective well‐being for cases.

Research limitations/implications

Larger sample sizes will be needed to reliably assess the size of impact, cross‐cultural variation in costs, and whether costs vary according to severity of food allergy or between diagnosed versus self‐reported food allergy. The costs effectiveness of diagnostic methods or interventions may also be assessed using this instrument. If economic costs of food allergy are significant in the population further consideration from a public health policy perspective will be required.

Originality/value

To date, economic impact of food allergy on individuals and households has not been quantified. The paper addresses this.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 112 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Content available
Article

Pasquale Caponnetto, Rosanna Magro, Lucio Inguscio and Maria Concetta Cannella

Emergency room have particularly stressful work situations. Emergency room personnel cope with stressors on a daily basis. These stressors can be risks factor for burn out…

Abstract

Emergency room have particularly stressful work situations. Emergency room personnel cope with stressors on a daily basis. These stressors can be risks factor for burn out and for reduced quality of life and work motivation. Emergency room staff of one of ASP 3 CT urban hospital in Acireale, Italy participated to stress management program by autogenic training twice a month for 16 weeks. This program were prepared based on existing research and studies, and were conducted by clinical psychologists. We found that the mean value in pre-test is significantly different from mean value in post-test for: Perceived Stress Scale PPS (t=7.72 with 27 df and P<0.001); Euro Quality for life (t=-14,13 with 27 df and P<0.001); Work motivation assessed by Visual Analogue scale VAS (t=-4.52 with 27 df and P<0.001). In the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the mean value is significantly different for emotional exhaustion sub-scale (t=5.64 with 27 with 27 df and P<0.001) and for depersonalization subscale (t=6.67 with 27 df and P<0.001). No significant difference was observed for the personal accomplishment sub-scale. This research suggests that psychological interventions with emergency room staff are effective. Our study showed effectiveness of an auto-genic and stress management training in improvement of quality of life, work motivation, burn-out and stress perceptions for emergency department team.

Details

Mental Illness, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2036-7465

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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Article

Gil Kovac, Yasir Abbasi and David Owens

The purpose of this paper is to retrospectively evaluate outcomes measured for patients attending the Leeds Addiction Unit (LAU) for cannabis use disorders.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to retrospectively evaluate outcomes measured for patients attending the Leeds Addiction Unit (LAU) for cannabis use disorders.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors performed a retrospective evaluation of data for clients referred to LAU for cannabis use disorders. These clients are routinely allocated to a programme of social behaviour and network therapy (SBNT), and methods of monitoring treatment include four questionnaires completed by clients, and the collection of treatment outcomes profile (TOP) data. Data were compared using non-parametric statistical methods.

Findings

Of 158 clients included in the study, 20 completed the four questionnaires at assessment and follow-up. A statistically significant improvement was found for the outcome measuring level of dependence (p=0.013). TOP data showed significant reduction in the average number of days of cannabis use over the past four weeks (p<0.001) and improved median scores for the client's rating of overall quality of life (p<0.001).

Practical implications

These findings suggest that treatment using SBNT can result in clinical improvement in cannabis use disorders. The promising results of the UK Alcohol Treatment Trial naturally raised the question as to whether SBNT can be adapted to treat substance use disorders other than alcoholism. This study aims to add to the body of evidence for this proposal.

Originality/value

This is the first evaluation of the service to measure outcomes for the treatment of cannabis misuse. This study is especially relevant given the recent changes made to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders regarding cannabis use disorders, and has triggered another evaluation of cannabis treatment at LAU looking into specific pharmacotherapy.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

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Book part

Kristian Bolin, Matias Eklöf, Sören Höjgård and Björn Lindgren

As summarized in our introductory Chapter 1, the trend toward ever-healthier elderly seems to have been broken (Figures 8 and 9). The share of young and middle-aged…

Abstract

As summarized in our introductory Chapter 1, the trend toward ever-healthier elderly seems to have been broken (Figures 8 and 9). The share of young and middle-aged Swedish men and women, reporting very good or good health status to the Survey of Living Conditions, started to decline already in the 1980s. As a consequence, as the cohorts are graying, the share of elderly people, reporting very good or good health status, has also begun to decline. Increasing health problems among Swedish oldest old have also been reported from the SWEOLD (SWEdish panel of living conditions of oldest OLD) study (Parker et al., 2004). Similar trends have been reported for the United States and for the entire EU-15. Part of the explanation appears to be the growth at young ages in allergy, asthma, diabetes, other long-standing illness, and health problems associated with obesity. In the time perspective of our simulations, these trends in long-standing health problems might have less impact on the health of the elderly (and their demand for healthcare and old-age care or their life expectancy) than on the health of people in their middle ages but still be important. In this section, we will present some additional information on the development of health status during the last 20 years or so for the Swedish population.

Details

Simulating an Ageing Population: A Microsimulation Approach Applied to Sweden
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-444-53253-4

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