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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2021

Josephine Vaughan, Kim Maund, Thayaparan Gajendran, Justine Lloyd, Cathy Smith and Michael Cohen

This study aims to address the research gap about value in the holistic discourse of creative placemaking. It identifies and synthesises the often discounted social and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to address the research gap about value in the holistic discourse of creative placemaking. It identifies and synthesises the often discounted social and environmental values of creative placemaking along with typically emphasised economic values.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper builds upon two research phases; first, a review and extraction of creative placemaking value indicators from relevant current urban, cultural and planning literature; and second, the identification of relevant, practice-based, value indicators through interviews with 23 placemaking experts including practitioners, urban planners, developers and place managers from the two largest cities of NSW, Australia; Sydney and Newcastle.

Findings

This study identifies three broad thematics for valuing creative placemaking along with several sub-categories of qualitative and quantitative indicators. These indicators reveal the holistic value of creative placemaking for its key stakeholders, including expert placemakers, designers, building developers, government and community groups. A key conclusion of the research is the need for tools that grasp the interconnected, and at times conflicting, nature of placemaking’s social, economic and environmental outcomes.

Originality/value

While a variety of value indicators exist to understand the need for ongoing resourcing of creative placemaking, stakeholders identified the limitations of current approaches to determine, represent and appraise the value of creative placemaking. The indicators of value proposed in this research consolidate and extend current discourse about the value of creative placemaking specifically. The indicators themselves have profound practical implications for how creative placemaking is conceived, executed and evaluated. Theoretically, the study builds on the deep relationships between values and practice in creative placemaking, as well as critiquing narrow forms of evaluation that entrench economic benefits over other outcomes.

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2021

Jerry Chati Tasantab, Thayaparan Gajendran, Toinpre Owi and Emmanuel Raju

Conventional lecture-based educational approaches alone might not be able to portray the complexity of disaster risk management practice and its real-life dynamics. One…

Abstract

Purpose

Conventional lecture-based educational approaches alone might not be able to portray the complexity of disaster risk management practice and its real-life dynamics. One work-integrated learning practice that can give students practical work-related experiences is simulation-based learning. However, there is a limited discourse on simulation-based learning in disaster risk management education at the tertiary level. As tertiary education plays a crucial role in developing capabilities within the workforce, simulation-based learning can evoke or replicate substantial aspects of the real world in a fully interactive fashion. This paper aims to present outcomes of simulation-based learning sessions the authors designed and delivered in a disaster risk management course.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors developed a framework to illustrate simulation-based learning in a disaster risk management programme. It was then used as a guide to design and execute simulation-based learning sessions. An autoethnographic methodology was then applied to reflectively narrate the experiences and feelings during the design and execution of the simulations.

Findings

The evaluation of the simulation sessions showed that participants were able to apply their knowledge and demonstrate the skills required to make critical decisions in disaster risk reduction. The conclusion from the simulation-based learning sessions is that making simulation-based learning a part of the pedagogy of disaster risk management education enables students to gain practical experience, deliberate ethical tensions and practical dilemmas and develop the ability to work with multiple perspectives.

Originality/value

The simulated workplace experience allowed students to experience decision-making as disaster risk management professionals, allowing them to integrate theory with practice.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2020

Jerry Chati Tasantab, Thayaparan Gajendran, Jason von Meding and Kim Maund

Climate change is predicted to increase the vulnerability of urban populations to flood hazards. Against this backdrop, flood risk adaptation has become pertinent…

Abstract

Purpose

Climate change is predicted to increase the vulnerability of urban populations to flood hazards. Against this backdrop, flood risk adaptation has become pertinent. However, in Ghana, current flood risk management practice is fostered by a reactive culture. There is limited research on how communities and government agencies are engaging with flood risk adaptation in improving resilience. Therefore, this paper aims to analyse the culture of communities and agencies through the cultural theory of risk (CTR), towards understanding the flood risk adaptation in Accra, Ghana. Culture is deciphered using the beliefs held by residents and public agency officials.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative methodology, underpinned by the constructivist paradigm, was adopted to understand factors that influence flood risk adaptation in informal settlements. Data was gathered using household and institutional interviews in Glefe, Accra, Ghana.

Findings

The results show that both disaster risk management institutions and community members are deeply concerned about current and future flood risk. However, their cultural beliefs concerning flood risk and adaptation are contradictory, broadly framed by fatalist, individualist and hierarchist beliefs. The contradictory emergent beliefs contribute to a clash of expectations and create uncertainty about how to respond to flood risk, impacting the implementation of required adaptation measures. Developing a collaborative flood risk management framework and a shared understanding of adaptation approaches may be a better alternative.

Originality/value

This paper advances understanding of how culture influences flood risk adaptation in developing country context.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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Article
Publication date: 25 August 2020

Samuel Fiifi Hammond, Thayaparan Gajendran, David A. Savage and Kim Maund

Given the importance of green construction for reducing the negative environmental impact of the construction industry, and the numerous policies instituted by governments…

Abstract

Purpose

Given the importance of green construction for reducing the negative environmental impact of the construction industry, and the numerous policies instituted by governments around the world to motivate building construction stakeholders, why is there still a limited level of adoption?

Design/methodology/approach

Building on studies that have questioned the dominant framing of the limited adoption of green construction as an inefficient behaviour, this study proposes a theoretical model characterising the two problems in the decision-making process that boost the reluctance of building construction stakeholders to embrace green construction. A traditional literature review, combining deductive and inductive approaches was employed.

Findings

The theoretical model consists of six conceptual variables as follows: social norms, personal dilemma, trust, loss aversion, self-interest and green construction adoption. The expected relationships between them are also provided.

Research limitations/implications

The theoretical model has not been empirically tested; however, it can be replicated or adapted for empirical investigation in any context.

Practical implications

This study may help in identifying which factors must be given attention in policy-making in order to promote the adoption of green technologies and practices. Specifically, subjecting the theoretical model to empirical test will reveal the strongest paths that can be used to curtail the reluctance of the industry to embrace green construction.

Originality/value

Contributes towards the current research agenda on the reasons for the low level of voluntary adoption of green construction. It also provides theoretical answers to the questions regarding the limited impact of the plentiful policy mechanisms instituted by governments around the world to promote green construction adoption.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2019

Matthew Abunyewah, Thayaparan Gajendran, Kim Maund and Seth Asare Okyere

Disaster information is an important resource for flood preparedness, however, the transition of information provision to preparedness and consequently to damage reduction…

Abstract

Purpose

Disaster information is an important resource for flood preparedness, however, the transition of information provision to preparedness and consequently to damage reduction is complex. The nature of complexity has made it imperative to provide context-specific evidence on how disaster information provision influences intentions to prepare for flood hazard. This paper seeks to investigate how message clarity and source credibility mediate and moderate the relationship between information sufficiency and intentions to prepare. This paper aims to provide valuable insights into the relationship between the major components of disaster communication and their influence on intentions to prepare.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a cross-sectional survey design to test the relationship between information sufficiency, message clarity and source credibility. A total of 1,064 questionnaire surveys were conducted on a face-to-face basis. The data collection was done in one month with ten research assistants. Participants of the study were randomly selected from adults over 18-years old who have lived in the study areas for at least three years. Responses from participants were analysed using a structural equation modelling (SEM) technique and SPSS AMOS version 24 software.

Findings

Findings suggest that the information sufficiency-intentions to prepare relationship is enhanced when adequate disaster information communicated is clear and from a credible source. This implies that policymakers and risk communicators need to critically assess the clarity of disaster information content and the credibility of the source in the dissemination of information during the communication process. It also provides a better understanding of the factors that influence people’s intentions to prepare for flood hazards.

Research limitations/implications

This current study did not account for the specific nature or content of information necessary to increase message clarity and source credibility for disaster preparedness. In addition, the study did not cover the channels of communication ideal to stimulate people’s intentions to flood preparedness. Although these do not undermine the significance of the present study, they present entry points for further studies. In view of the on-going urbanisation dynamics and the complex socio-spatial patterns emerging in the Greater Accra Area, it is recommended that further studies explore the channels of communication that will suit the diverse socio-spatial profile of residents (e.g. age, location, ethnicity, etc.).

Originality/value

While a plethora of studies emphasize the role of source credibility, information sufficiency and message clarity towards disaster preparedness, there is at present little evidence on the mediating and moderating role of the communication variables. In this study, we propose and test the mediating and moderating role of message clarity and source credibility on the relationship between information sufficiency and intentions to prepare. The findings of this paper provide other incentives that encourage message audiences to take up precautionary measures towards flood hazards. In addition, with a view that people fail to prepare because of lack of sufficient information, the study findings suggest that the provision of sufficient information may enhance preparedness.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2007

Thayaparan Gajendran and Graham Brewer

Although the deployment of information and communication technology (ICT) in the construction industry is widespread recent research indicates that the surrounding…

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Abstract

Purpose

Although the deployment of information and communication technology (ICT) in the construction industry is widespread recent research indicates that the surrounding contextual issues hinder its successful application in many project settings. This paper aims to develop a framework for the analysis of organisational culture in respect of ICT implementation across an organisation in the construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

An re‐analysis of critical success factors (CSF) for ICT integration, identified through data from a Delphi study of industry experts and a questionnaire survey of ICT users, using Martin's three‐perspective framework applying both the functional and non‐functional approaches to cultural analysis was conducted.

Findings

The research revealed the theoretical dimensions and properties of organisational culture that influence CSFs for ICT integration in construction projects teams. This paper concludes by highlighting the influence of the organisation's culture, manifested though the nature and extent of shared understanding, on the likely success of ICT implementation.

Originality/value

The deployment of ICT without appropriate consideration of contextual issues, in particular, organisational culture, will be likely to generate disappointing results. The framework presented in this paper provides a rigorous foundation for consideration of such issues.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

Thayaparan Gajendran and Graham Brewer

The purpose of this paper is to discuss how culture, influenced by the project setup and contextual issues, impacts on information and communication technology (ICT…

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1394

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss how culture, influenced by the project setup and contextual issues, impacts on information and communication technology (ICT) engagement, through a multiple perspective approach to cultural assessment. A “cultural lens” is used to understand the level of ICT engagement in project organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

Cultural analysis (CA) is employed as the overarching research methodology. The CA investigates the conflicts between the “espoused values” and “actual beliefs” of members to understand culture. A pre‐existing CA framework with established “espoused values” for ICT implementation is used in this study. Ethnographic interview in a case study setup is employed to extract actual cultural beliefs. These beliefs are then analysed through the CA framework to explain cultural environment and its impact on ICT implementation.

Findings

The ICT‐related behaviour of the project team members is contextual to a project environment. This implies that effective ICT adoption requires careful consideration of the cultural traits in the design and implementation phases. It is suggested that neither a simple linear prescription nor overlooking specific contextual aspects is beneficial for effective ICT implementation.

Originality/value

This paper contributes in developing an understanding of: how CA framework through deciphering “espoused values” and “actual beliefs” can assist in studying organisational issues; and how the contextual issues shape the culture in a project organisation leading to “integrated” or “fragmented” ICT implementation.

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

Graham Brewer and Thayaparan Gajendran

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of an appropriate investigative mechanism deployed to uncover the link between individual attitude, consequent…

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2072

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of an appropriate investigative mechanism deployed to uncover the link between individual attitude, consequent decision making and development of group culture, and their impact on the use of information and communication technology/building information modelling (ICT/BIM) across a temporary project organisation (TPO).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper develops a protocol and conducts a case study of a specialist subcontractor associated with the design and construction of an engineered facade operating in a specific TPO. It adopts a phenomenological perspective, utilising ethnographic data collection techniques and constructivist analysis/abstraction.

Findings

Differentiation resulted in impaired e‐business activity; however, there was a positive impact on the overall project outcome. This was attributed to the positive cultural traits demonstrated by the specialist subcontractor. Individuals' attitudinal traits develop over time through personal experiences and interaction with others. These traits are transportable and potentially infectious, as in this case, where the result was beneficial to the stakeholders.

Originality/value

The paper describes the successful implementation of an appropriate investigative protocol to chart the links between the beliefs and actions of individuals in relation to ICT/BIM, and the consequences for TPO culture and the project as a whole.

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2013

Graham Brewer, Thayaparan Gajendran, Marcus Jefferies, Denny McGeorge, Steve Rowlinson and Andrew Dainty

Public‐private partnerships (PPPs) and other innovative procurement mechanisms are frequently used to deliver both an asset and a public service over a protracted period…

Abstract

Purpose

Public‐private partnerships (PPPs) and other innovative procurement mechanisms are frequently used to deliver both an asset and a public service over a protracted period. The value streams to the parties involved can be complex, but generally arise from the satisfactory provision of infrastructure that is fit for purpose throughout its life. This research aims to investigate the effectiveness of the facility management (FM) function in delivering long‐term value to both the client and consortium.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper describes a case study of a PPP in Australia that delivered social infrastructure in multiple locations to a state government. Drawing upon multiple perspectives from within the consortium, it utilises inductive principles to identify the influences on value generation through innovation by the FM function.

Findings

The ability of an Australian FM contractor to provide value within a PPP context has been shown to reflect some of the attributes described in literature. However, the extent of innovation, especially in the design and construction phases, has been limited by organisational history and capability, and relational and contextual issues.

Originality/value

This research highlights a flaw in the rhetoric relating to PPP delivery, namely the disconnection between the asset delivery and service delivery phases, which stifles the consortium's capacity to innovate and maximise value. It reveals a set of influences that both resonate with the literature and plausibly explain the suboptimal performance of the FM function within an Australian PPP. By using highly iterative analysis leading to within‐case generalisability, it provides a robust basis for wider investigation of the problem.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2014

Marcus Jefferies, Graham John Brewer and Thayaparan Gajendran

There has been a significant increase in the use of relationship contracting in the global construction industry, with strategies such as Partnering, Alliancing and…

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2545

Abstract

Purpose

There has been a significant increase in the use of relationship contracting in the global construction industry, with strategies such as Partnering, Alliancing and Public-Private Partnerships all used. These approaches were introduced to the Australian construction industry in the 1990s in an attempt to overcome the adversarial nature of traditional contracting methods. The purpose of this paper is to investigate factors that influence the successful implementation of Project Alliancing by means of a case study approach focusing on the procurement of a large water treatment plant. The research findings identify critical success factors (CSFs) both from literature and the case study project.

Design/methodology/approach

The research traces the origins of Alliancing and identifies CSFs by reviewing literature and analysing a current case study project. The paper first identifies CSFs on a global scale by establishing a theoretical framework of CSFs and then compares this to the case study project. A case study of an Australian Alliance project is investigated whereby a semi-structured interview process, involving senior managers from the six partners from the Alliance, was used in conjunction with a review of project documentation. The findings of the case study project are compared to the literature and any new CSFs are identified.

Findings

Alliancing helps to establish and manage the relationships between all parties, remove barriers and encourage maximum contribution to achieve success. Alliancing provides a project delivery method that promotes open communication, equality and a systematic problem resolution process. Team culture focusing on an “open book/no blame” approach is vital to the success of an Alliance. Five CSFs were identified as specifically influencing the success of the case study project: the use of an integrated Alliance office; the staging of project and stretch targets; establishing project specific key performance indicators; facilitating on-going workshops; and the integration of a web-based management programme.

Originality/value

The research findings assist both public and private sectors by identifying factors that are critical for success in Alliancing. Five additional factors were identified as specifically influencing the success of the case study project. Since this research was conducted, Australia has seen a further increase in relationship contracting where the likes of Alliancing is often used as the default approach for certain Public Sector projects. Ongoing research into Alliancing is vital to ensure the development of sustainable procurement models, successful operational viability, fair risk distribution and value for money.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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