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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2012

Hassan Chaudhry and George Hodge

The purpose of this paper is to explore the applications of postponement strategy in the textile and apparel industry, with a particular focus on the supply chain

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5744

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the applications of postponement strategy in the textile and apparel industry, with a particular focus on the supply chain structure, relationships and enabling activities supporting postponement strategy across the supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

For this research, a case study approach, supported by structured interviews, was adopted. The purpose was to explore the application of postponement with the objective of gathering considerable data from an organization or multiple organizations to develop the clearest possible picture of the phenomenon.

Findings

The nature of product, downstream demand and the supply chain structure impacts the choice of postponement strategy. Companies operating with manufacturing and logistics postponement share data across their supply chain extensively, while companies adopting purchasing postponement work towards enhancing suppliers’ capabilities and fostering relationships across their supply chains.

Research limitations/implications

The case study method limitations include lack of rigor and statistical generalization, small sample size and convenience sampling and lack of establishment of causal relationship. However a thorough study design and process can make case‐based research more rigorous and reliable, but caution still needs to be exercised while applying findings on differing scenarios.

Originality/value

The case studies depict the application of postponement and the enabling supply chain structures. Previous studies have either looked on the organizational perspective or supply chain perspective with regards to the power and dependence attributes. These cases look at the interaction routines and structures among the supply chains.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2020

Simone Guercini and Andrea Runfola

This paper aims to deal with the issue of business model change in industrial markets. It considers the fast-fashion supply chain by addressing the following research…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to deal with the issue of business model change in industrial markets. It considers the fast-fashion supply chain by addressing the following research questions: What are the paths of change of the supplier’s business model to match the business model of fast fashion customers? How can a supplier’s business model be adapted to customer’s requirements in these paths of change?

Design/methodology/approach

Empirically, the paper presents a multiple case study of 10 semi-finished textile suppliers, carried out through a long-term research programme in the Italian textile industrial district of Prato.

Findings

The multiple-case study shows some key drivers of change in the suppliers’ business models. Three main paths emerged from the interactions with fast fashion clients. Paradoxes in the supplier’s business model changes are identified and discussed.

Research limitations/implications

The paper proposes implications for suppliers interacting with fast fashion clients and discusses how the adaptation of business models may be interpreted. This study points out how matching the business model of the customers does not call for alignment of similar features.

Originality/value

The paper deals with an understudied topic within the literature: business models change in business to business markets, taking into consideration the perspective of the supplier. It considers buyers-seller relationships in industrial supply chains as being part of a chain of business models and the need for the supplier’s business model to adapt and match one of the clients. The paper proposes two potential interpretations of such adaptation.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 36 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 21 May 2019

Ida Marie Sandvik and Wendy Stubbs

The purpose of this paper is to explore the drivers, inhibitors and enablers of creating a textile-to-textile recycling system in the Scandinavian fashion industry. It…

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5756

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the drivers, inhibitors and enablers of creating a textile-to-textile recycling system in the Scandinavian fashion industry. It investigates the technology, innovation and systemic changes required to enable circular supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

The research study uses a qualitative, interpretivist approach, drawing on in-depth semi-structured interviews with stakeholders in the Scandinavian fashion industry.

Findings

The main inhibitors to textile-to-textile recycling systems in the Scandinavian fashion industry are: limited technology which creates a challenge for separating materials; high costs of research and development and building the supporting logistics; complexity of supply chains including the multitude of stakeholders involved in product development. The enablers are design and use of new materials, increased garment collection and collaboration. This research suggests that sorting and recycling technology can be enhanced with the use of digital technologies, as this would create transparency, traceability and automatisation.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited by a small sample size and lack of representation of all key stakeholder groups, which limits the ability to generalise these findings. However, as an exploratory study, the findings provide insights that can be further tested in other contexts.

Originality/value

Understanding of textile-to-textile recycling is emerging both theoretically and practically, however, there is still much that is not understood. This research contributes to furthering understanding of how technology, collaboration and systemic change in the fashion industry can support opportunities for textile-to-textile recycling, thereby aligning with circular economy principles.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Karan Khurana and Marco Ricchetti

The purpose of this paper is to trace developments in the fashion business commitment to sustainability over two decades and identify the drivers that progressively…

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5766

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to trace developments in the fashion business commitment to sustainability over two decades and identify the drivers that progressively changed fashion brands’ perspective on sustainable supply chain management.

Design/methodology/approach

The research methodology is in the lines of Donald Schon reflective practice. Reflection-on-action is based on one of the authors practice in consultancy to fashion companies and in dialog with NGOs. The professional experience has been reconsidered through the analysis of the literature on sustainability initiatives and review of case histories.

Findings

The time span considered captures fashion brands sustainability awareness in its statu nascenti (nascent state) revealing a trial and error process that led to progressive refinements of both means and ends. Change drivers identified are: go beyond monitoring, adopt a comprehensive approach, look beyond first tier of suppliers, integrate sustainability to core business practices and bring transparency to the supply chain.

Originality/value

Existing literature surveys show that authors used to focus on specific issues and concentrate on individual case studies, under-representing the complex set of factors that companies, institutions and NGOs address, including the effect of past decisions, successes and mistakes. The paper is a first step to fill the gap and provides an up-to-date overview of current developments aimed at both scholars and practitioners, especially CSR and marketing managers and NGOs campaigners.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Rudrajeet Pal

The global textile-fashion industry is resource inefficient thus requiring higher product-service systems (PSS) intervention. Further, insight of how PSS extends corporate…

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1412

Abstract

Purpose

The global textile-fashion industry is resource inefficient thus requiring higher product-service systems (PSS) intervention. Further, insight of how PSS extends corporate responsibility is rather limited; knowledge of which may contribute towards increased PSS viability. The purpose of this paper is to explore how companies operating with used-clothing PSS extend their responsibilities through servitization.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory study of seven companies operating with various used-clothing PSS is conducted through semi-structured interviews and supplementary document studies.

Findings

Six dominant ways through which servitization drives responsibility in used-clothing PSS are identified. These are through: value-adding services, product leverage, collaborative partnership, information transparency, awareness and platform-enabled networking. Two trade-offs exist in terms of their focus on physical process or digitalization, and developed by honing core competency or collaborative partnership. Further three differentiating attributes underlie these mechanisms for: raising awareness and/or improving transparency, collaboration in value creation and/or in promoting consumption, and product ownership and/or leverage.

Research limitations/implications

A wide range of used-clothing PSS exists each in its own way extending responsibility. In-depth studies are required to investigate the relationship between servitization and extended responsibility for diverse PSS-types and on type of responsibilities they address.

Practical implications

By identifying the key mechanisms or ways and their underlying characteristics companies can identify new servitization forms and ways to extend their responsibility, identify best practices and establish viability beyond the traditional measures, e.g. financial.

Originality/value

So far no studies have investigated the role of servitization in PSS and how it extends corporate responsibility, especially in industries like textile-fashion, where both resource efficiency and responsibility is low.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Simone Guercini

Quick fashion formulas can be described as a product/service characterised mainly by its potential to supply retailers with a range renewal service that is produced at…

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3165

Abstract

Quick fashion formulas can be described as a product/service characterised mainly by its potential to supply retailers with a range renewal service that is produced at short time gaps. The purpose of this paper is to examine the hypothesis that by adopting new quick fashion formulas clothing manufacturers can at least in part integrate the different factors that traditionally contributed to the success of operators in different strategic groups. In the case of the Italian firm analysed here, the range renewal service and consequently the development of a new production management model are integrated with construction of a strong brand identity, which has resulted in increased performance. The development of new quick fashion formulas appears symptomatic of transition from a production‐driven to a market‐driven characterisation of the apparel manufacturing sector. The development and success of quick fashion formulas such as those analysed in this paper may have important implications not only for the evolution of clothing distribution, but indeed for the whole supply chain upstream of the retailer, including textiles manufacturers who produce yarn and fabric.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2013

Andrea Runfola and Simone Guercini

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between the fast fashion formula and the process of firm internationalization. Possible answers are sought to…

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9806

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between the fast fashion formula and the process of firm internationalization. Possible answers are sought to the following research question: does the fast fashion formula drive the internationalization process (driving the change), or does the internationalization process change the model (changing the model).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents and discusses the data collected during a ten‐year longitudinal case analysis of an Italian fast fashion company. Three main steps in the firm's international expansion are identified, and the firm's strategies for managing its fast model in each are then discussed.

Findings

The findings highlight how the process of internationalization has exerted pressure on the firm's business model. In particular, the case reveals that the company's international development has had a strong impact on three main components of its fast fashion model.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to previous work on fast fashion by focusing on the sustainability of such models during international expansion, a key theme which has to date received little attention in ongoing academic debate on the fast fashion phenomenon.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Richard M. Jones

The concepts of supply chain management and quick response manufacturing systems have been forwarded in the clothing sector as a route to competitive advantage for…

Abstract

The concepts of supply chain management and quick response manufacturing systems have been forwarded in the clothing sector as a route to competitive advantage for manufacturers based in high labour cost countries. An integral part of the advantage gained via such systems is reduction in inventory throughout the supply chain. The aim of the paper is to examine the movement in inventory in the clothing sector relative to the average as obtained in the manufacturing sector as a whole and to use the results to test the hypothesis that supply chain management has progressed in the sector.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Mário de Araújo

This work analyses global trade and production of textiles and clothing and the organisational trends occurring in enterprises in order to enable them to face increased…

Abstract

This work analyses global trade and production of textiles and clothing and the organisational trends occurring in enterprises in order to enable them to face increased competition due to trade liberalisation and the communications revolution. It introduces the concept of ‘quick response’ and characterises the problems it aims to overcome. The first part covers an analysis of advanced telecommunication systems such as EDI and the methodologies of TQM, as well as the use of ‘flexible manufacturing systems’, some of which are still in an R&D phase. In the second part, product‐oriented organisational structures and flow type production systems are looked at, as well as the concepts of CIM and CIB. The need to shorten lead time and of training multifunctional personnel is stressed. This work is a result of the author's experience as a research worker in the field of engineering and management applied to textiles and clothing. He is also involved as a consultant in strategic planning and the implementation of schemes for modernising companies and sectoral industrial restructuring studies for the Commission of the European Union.

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Manoj Kumar Paras and Antonela Curteza

The purpose of this study is to review the literature and practice of upcycling. In particular, the objective of this study is threefold: to comprehend the concept of…

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1466

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to review the literature and practice of upcycling. In particular, the objective of this study is threefold: to comprehend the concept of upcycling and, subsequently, understanding the prominent terminologies used in the literature; to understand the process of upcycling and problem associated with it; and to review current literature and practice of upcycling for clothes.

Design/methodology/approach

A scientific literature review procedure proposed by Mayring (2002) was adopted to select and screen the paper that comprises the following steps: material collection, descriptive analysis and material evaluation.

Findings

Upcycling literature has witnessed significant contribution in the past one decade. The paper has identified various terminologies and definitions such as recycling, down-cycling, upcycling and redesign, which are used in the literature.

Research limitations/implications

The present study may help the scholars to understand the current state of literature. A practitioner of upcycling can use the findings to improve and standardise the existing process.

Originality/value

The process of redesigning is one of the important steps in upcycling, which comprises ideation, reconstruction and fitting. The limitation of redesigning is variability in size and pattern. This can be overcome through various techniques such as craftsmanship, time, innovation, provenance, desire and narrative.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

Keywords

1 – 10 of 245