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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1994

Dean Elmuti

Presents a longitudinal field study which compares changes inperceptions of productivity and attendance behaviours for participantsin a drug‐testing programme in a…

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2294

Abstract

Presents a longitudinal field study which compares changes in perceptions of productivity and attendance behaviours for participants in a drug‐testing programme in a manufacturing firm in the mid‐western USA. Employee efficiency, productivity and absenteeism changes related to the implementation of the drug‐testing programme were measured by collecting and analysing actual organizational data. Data for each of the measures were collected for a 42‐month period, ranging from 18 months prior to the implementation of the programme to 24 months after the programme began. The attitudinal results provide, at best, circumspect support for the claims of drug‐testing proponents that the programme reduces drug abuse in the workplace and improves overall productivity. The performance results, however, document a positive and substantial impact of drug‐testing initiative on employee productivity and absenteeism rates.

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Employee Councelling Today, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-8217

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1997

Zhonglin He, Geoff Staples, Margaret Ross, Ian Court and Keith Hazzard

Suggests that, in order to detect and correct software defects as early as possible, identifying and generating more defect‐sensitive test cases for software unit and

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1264

Abstract

Suggests that, in order to detect and correct software defects as early as possible, identifying and generating more defect‐sensitive test cases for software unit and subsystem testing is one solution. Proposes an orthogonal software testing approach based on the quality optimization techniques, Taguchi methods. This orthogonal approach treats the input parameters of a software unit or subsystem as design factors in an orthogonal arrays, and stratifies input parameter domains into equivalent classes to form levels of factors. Describes how test cases are generated statistically for each trial of factorial orthogonal experiments. The adequacy of the generated test cases can be validated by examining testing coverage metrics. The results of test case executions can be analysed in order to find the sensibility of test cases for detecting defects, to generate more effective test cases in further testing, and to help locate and correct defects in the early stage of testing.

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Logistics Information Management, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Ying‐Tzu Lu and Brian H. Kleiner

Looks at drug use (and testing for it) in the workplace, and how it affects businesses. States, although drug users affect fellow workers through accidents at work, the…

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2077

Abstract

Looks at drug use (and testing for it) in the workplace, and how it affects businesses. States, although drug users affect fellow workers through accidents at work, the non‐users may also experience lowered morale. Directs employers how to introduce and operate drug testing programmes, listing six considerations. Concludes that once employers are aware of the legality of their actions they can perform drug testing programmes and provide both a drug‐free workplace and a safe working environment.

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Management Research News, vol. 27 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

B. Wayne Rockmore, Thomas W. Zimmerer and Foard F. Jones

States that management faces a dilemma when it rightly desires to create and maintain a drug‐free work environment. Addresses the need to test employees to ensure a safe…

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866

Abstract

States that management faces a dilemma when it rightly desires to create and maintain a drug‐free work environment. Addresses the need to test employees to ensure a safe and productive workplace while ensuring that the testing procedures are neither demeaning to employees or viewed as an invasion of privacy. Recommends the establishment of a five‐step process. States that asking and answering the right questions before setting policy in this sensitive human resources area is essential. The framework presented is designed to assist management in planning for the development of a drug testing programme, responsive to the needs of the organization and its employees.

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Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 9 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2008

Nicola Singleton

Despite a considerable increase in drug testing within the criminal justice system (CJS) through schemes such as the drug interventions programme, research is equivocal…

Abstract

Despite a considerable increase in drug testing within the criminal justice system (CJS) through schemes such as the drug interventions programme, research is equivocal about its added value, as a recent series of reports from the UK Drug Policy Commission highlighted. The role of drug testing needs to be clarified and its cost‐effectiveness confirmed through studies with comparative regimes. Any further expansion of drug testing within the CJS should be undertaken with caution.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

M. Georgievski and N. Sharda

This paper seeks to present a comparative study of the traditional usability‐testing process and the re‐engineered usability‐testing process for live multimedia systems.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to present a comparative study of the traditional usability‐testing process and the re‐engineered usability‐testing process for live multimedia systems.

Design/methodology/approach

Provides an overview of current usability‐testing techniques and usability laboratory configurations, and identifies some gaps in the traditional usability‐testing approach.

Findings

Traditional usability‐testing procedures are suitable for testing systems in the static environment but prove to be sub‐optimal in testing systems for dynamic (real‐time) environments.

Originality/value

The traditional set‐up is compared with innovative laboratory configuration, which consists of three computer systems: the test system in the middle augmented by two systems on either side that function as the scenario presenter and the data collection system. The re‐engineered usability‐testing process streamlined usability experiments and reduced the task completion times.

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Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Carol Pound, Lisa Duizer and Katie McDowell

Consumer responses of attribute liking and intensity as well as overall liking of commercial chocolate were evaluated in four types of testing situations (central…

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1086

Abstract

Consumer responses of attribute liking and intensity as well as overall liking of commercial chocolate were evaluated in four types of testing situations (central location, in‐home, teaching laboratory and formal sensory laboratory). The aim was to determine if there were differences in these responses based on testing situation. This was also an attempt to evaluate and validate the use of in‐home testing for product development samples. Perceptions of certain attributes were found to differ in different testing situations but liking scores of these attributes did not. Consumers were more critical of attributes when tested in a formal sensory laboratory. All four locations tested gave similar results, meaning that, conducting sensory panels at home is as valid a method of collecting consumer opinion as traditional locations. It should be noted that the use of a formal sensory laboratory might have an impact on cost effectiveness of new product development. Results are more likely to indicate the need to continue formulation in order to perfect attribute scores, although this may not actually improve consumer‐liking scores. This continued product development only serves to increase the costs and slow the speed to market.

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British Food Journal, vol. 102 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

Alison Chapman

Concept development, evaluation and testing in the new (food) product development situation are reviewed. An analysis is made of why, how and when to concept test, based…

Abstract

Concept development, evaluation and testing in the new (food) product development situation are reviewed. An analysis is made of why, how and when to concept test, based on previous authors' work and various pre‐product launch situations. Emphasis is made of concept testing's validity and its use as an aid in successful product development. The use of concept testing during the reformulation of existing products is considered in depth — an area which has previously lacked adequate appraisal. The flexibility of concept testing is highlighted in particular case study examples, reflecting a feeling that concept testing should not be isolated within the new product development process.

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British Food Journal, vol. 90 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Leanne Jardine‐Tweedie and Phillip C. Wright

This paper discusses the use of drugs in the workplace with particular enphasis on the practice of drug testing, outlining arguments, both for and against. We conclude…

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2626

Abstract

This paper discusses the use of drugs in the workplace with particular enphasis on the practice of drug testing, outlining arguments, both for and against. We conclude that drug testing tends to destroy the employee‐employer relationship, recommending strongly not to engage in the practice. Finally, alternatives to drug testing are outlined, culminating in a call to place greater emphasis on performance testing.

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Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 13 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1969

A.H. Parker

THE great expansion in the use of complex electronic equipment over the past few years has imposed an ever increasing problem of testing and maintaining such equipments on…

Abstract

THE great expansion in the use of complex electronic equipment over the past few years has imposed an ever increasing problem of testing and maintaining such equipments on both the source manufacturer and the user. Automatic testing can to a large degree solve this problem by increasing the speed and reliability of the testing method and by reducing the manpower involved.

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 41 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

1 – 10 of over 224000