Search results

1 – 10 of over 191000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Gorm Gabrielsen, Tore Kristensen and Flemming Hansen

Affirms the great need for corporate designs, yet states that the tests most frequently used are certainly not comprehensive. The reasons for these “partial” tests are…

Downloads
1235

Abstract

Affirms the great need for corporate designs, yet states that the tests most frequently used are certainly not comprehensive. The reasons for these “partial” tests are explored (focusing on incorrect assumptions, as well as research design and methodology). Concludes that data collection was not completed, and that the next steps are to complete the testing of the current designs.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Qiang Lu and Lincoln Wood

There are three distinct functions in the product realisation chain (product design, process design, and process execution) and thus there are two interfaces (product…

Downloads
4219

Abstract

Purpose

There are three distinct functions in the product realisation chain (product design, process design, and process execution) and thus there are two interfaces (product design – process design; process design – process execution) rather than one (product – manufacturing). This fact supports a need to shift from dyadic relationships to triadic relationships and from the traditionally single interface concept of design for manufacture (DFM) to multiple “design for” elements. This study seeks to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Through an in – depth case study in an electronics plant and qualitative data analysis, we reveal the existence and functions of these “design for” elements are revealed, and also the link between the implementation of these elements to the levels of process engineering capability.

Findings

Proactive and capable process engineering allows improvement of technical coordination among functions. This enables the “design for” mechanisms for both upstream elements (product design) and downstream elements (process execution); this has a positive impact on the performance of product realisation (especially time to market) and thus operational competitiveness.

Research limitations/implications

Since this is a single case study, future empirical research with larger sample sizes should provide further validation of these findings and demonstrate better generalisability of developed concepts.

Practical implications

This paper highlights several initiatives, conceptually linked to the appropriate “design for” elements, which may be applied in manufacturing settings to support product realisation objectives. Process design, as a significant and proactive intermediate component, should be given sufficient attention and investment.

Originality/value

The study expands the existing DFM concept to several new “design for” concepts and discusses some implementation‐related issues.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 26 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

Saskia M. de Theije, Peter C. Sander and Aarnout C. Brombacher

Because of the importance of the product design process, a good control of it is of vital importance. It is shown how design tests can be defined and executed that are…

Downloads
1853

Abstract

Because of the importance of the product design process, a good control of it is of vital importance. It is shown how design tests can be defined and executed that are able to identify quality problem. Emphasis will be on the early detection of reliability problems. The quality control method itself and the results reached at Philips Electronics Industries‐Consumer Electronics Division (PEI‐CED) in Taiwan will be discussed. First, the organisation of a design process and design reliability evaluation program in general will be considered. Next, it will be explained what opportunities for improvement of reliability control in the design process at PEI‐CED were detected. A risk analysis, aimed at identifying reliability risks and analysing them, will be the basis for the reliability tests that will be elaborated next.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 September 2021

Lorenzo Fiorineschi, Tommaso Bacci, Francesco Saverio Saverio Frillici, Simone Cubeda, Yary Volpe, Federico Rotini, Monica Carfagni and Bruno Facchini

This paper aims to present the design of a particular non-reactive test rig for combustion swirlers and first stage turbine nozzles. The test rig is required for important…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the design of a particular non-reactive test rig for combustion swirlers and first stage turbine nozzles. The test rig is required for important experimental activities aimed at the optimization of a specific class of gas turbines.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-disciplinary team performed the design process by following a tailored design approach, which has been developed for the specific case. The design outcomes allowed to build a fully functional test rig to be introduced in a test cell and then to perform preliminary experiments about the fluid dynamic behaviour of the turbine elements.

Findings

The followed design approach allowed to efficiently perform the task, by supporting the information exchange among the different subjects involved in both the conceptual and the embodiment design of the test rig. Additionally, the performed experiments allowed to achieve a final configuration that makes the test rig a valuable test case for combustor-turbine interaction studies.

Research limitations/implications

The study described in this paper is focused on the design of a specific test rig, used for first validation tests. However, the achieved results (both in terms of design and test) constitutes the underpinning of the in-depth investigations to be performed in the next steps of the experimental campaign.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the present paper is the first one that comprehensively describes the design activity of an experimental test rig for turbine application, also providing indications about the specific methodological procedure used to manage the process.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Harnessing the Power of Failure: Using Storytelling and Systems Engineering to Enhance Organizational Learning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-199-3

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 November 2020

Hyoung Seog Chung, Seung Pil Kim and Younseok Choi

The purpose of this paper is to propose a new approach of using additively manufactured parametric models in the wind tunnel test-based aerodynamic shape optimization…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a new approach of using additively manufactured parametric models in the wind tunnel test-based aerodynamic shape optimization (ASO) framework and to present its applicability test results obtained from a realistic aircraft design problem.

Design/methodology/approach

For aircraft shape optimization, the following three methodologies were used. First, as a validation study, the possibility of using rapid prototyping (RP) model in the wind tunnel test was verified. Second, through the wind tunnel test-based ASO, the application and feasibility of the real fighter aircraft shape optimization were verified. A generic fighter configuration is parameterized to generate various test models using additive manufacturing. Wind tunnel tests are conducted to measure their stability criteria in high angle of attack (AOA). Finally, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study was performed and analysis procedures, costs and results compared to the wind tunnel test were compared and reviewed.

Findings

RP technology can significantly reduce the time and cost of generating parametric wind tunnel models and can open up new possibilities for wind tunnel tests to be used in the rigorous aerodynamic design loop. There was a slight difference between the results of the RP model and the metallic model because of rigidity and surface roughness. However, the tendency of the aerodynamic characteristics was very similarly predictable. Although there are limitations to obtaining precise aerodynamic data, it is a suitable method to be applied to comparative studies on various shapes with large geo-metric changes in the early phase of design. The CFD analysis indicates that the wind tunnel-based ASO using the RP model shows the efficiency corresponding to the CFD shape optimization.

Research limitations/implications

The RP parametric models may have various assembly error sources and rigidity problems. The proposed methodology may not be suitable for collecting the accurate aerodynamic database of a final design; rather, the methodology is more suitable to screen out many configurations having fairly large shape variation in the early stage of the design process.

Practical implications

The wind tunnel test-based ASO can replace or supplement CFD-based ASO. In areas where CFD accuracy is low, such as high AOA flight characteristics, RP model wind tunnel-based ASO can be a research method that can secure both efficiency and accuracy advantages, providing ten times more effective in terms of cost and time. The wind tunnel test is used to obtain aerodynamic data at the final stage of shape design. It can be extended to a comparative study of several shapes in the early design phase. This procedure can be applied for both industrial level and educational aircraft design activities.

Originality/value

This study is the application to be applied as a parametric study on the whole aircraft, rather than using the RP model applying a simple partial control surface or configuration change of a part of the wing. The possibility of using the RP model was confirmed by comparing and verifying each other in a medium-sized wind tunnel using a relatively large RP model and a metallic model. It was verified that it can be applied in the shape design process, not the shape verification in the traditional design procedure, and a comparison with the CFD method was also performed. With further development and validation efforts, the new design framework may become an industrial standard for future aircraft development.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1984

G.W. Jacob

Semiconductor devices and systems containing them have become so complex that it is difficult and costly to test them adequately. The solution is to design them to be…

Abstract

Semiconductor devices and systems containing them have become so complex that it is difficult and costly to test them adequately. The solution is to design them to be testable. In this the author considers testability cost trade‐offs, outlines the interrelationship of test programming and designing for testability, and presents several methods of designing for testability.

Details

Microelectronics International, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-5362

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1995

R. Adams, P. Spitz and W. Vahey

With the emergence of surface mount technology and, more recently, advances in packaging technologies (i.e., ball grid arrays), test continues to be a complex…

Abstract

With the emergence of surface mount technology and, more recently, advances in packaging technologies (i.e., ball grid arrays), test continues to be a complex, time‐consuming process and, in the limit, unfeasible. The adoption of IEEE 1149.1 boundary‐scan and the wide acceptance of this standard have resulted in a pragmatic test solution for densely packed SMT circuit boards. Many organisations have become extremely successful in manufacturing test through their commitment to boundary‐scan. Although boundary‐scan has alleviated many of the test engineer's problems, all but a handful of these organisations have a narrow focus of using boundary‐scan to benefit only manufacturing test. However, this same technology can be exploited in design, at the prototype debug stage, as well as at the system test level, whether it be in the factory or the field, yielding significant benefits throughout the entire product life cycle. Three case studies are reviewed to highlight the problems posed by SMT at prototype debug, manufacturing test and system level test. The impact of boundary‐scan is illustrated at each stage of a product's typical life cycle. The paper looks at some real applications and benefits of boundary‐scan at the board prototype stage, the manufacturing test stage, as well as at the system‐level stage. The data presented represent three distinct industries: computer manufacturing, telecommunications and automatic test equipment.

Details

Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

S. Gary Teng, S. Michael Ho, Debra Shumar and Paul C. Liu

The aim of this research was to call attention to the implementation of failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) in a collaborative environment, the issues occurred in the…

Downloads
4546

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this research was to call attention to the implementation of failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) in a collaborative environment, the issues occurred in the implementation process, and a tool that can be used by all parties in a collaborative environment for FMEA process.

Design/methodology/approach

The discussion includes the procedure of an integrated FMEA approach, how to implement the procedure in a supply chain, and the common problems occurred in its implementation in automotive industry under a collaborative environment.

Findings

The research provided an example of inconsistency in the ranking of severity, occurrence, and detection to show that the inconsistency may delay FMEA implementation in a supply chain.

Originality/value

This study offered guidelines for manufacturing industry in correcting the problems in FMEA applications, so companies can adopt their FMEA process into a collaborative supply chain environment. This paper also demonstrated a Microsoft EXCEL‐based tool that can ease the FMEA process in a collaborative environment for determining sampling size, reliability and confidence level for tests in design verification and control plan as a part of integrated FMEA process.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Wei Zhou, David Heesom, Panagiotis Georgakis and Joseph H.M. Tah

The purpose of this paper is to clarify the CSCW in collaborative 4D modelling and its user interface (UI)/interaction designs for prototyping. Four-dimensional (4D…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to clarify the CSCW in collaborative 4D modelling and its user interface (UI)/interaction designs for prototyping. Four-dimensional (4D) modelling technology has potentials to integrate geographically dispersed planners to achieve collaborative construction planning. However, applying this technology in teamwork remains a challenge in computer-supported collaborative work (CSCW).

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopted user-centred design (UCD) methodology to investigate a usable 4D collaboration prototype through analysis, design and usability testing. By applying CSCW theories, it first clarified the meaning of 4D CSCW to formulate design propositions as design target. By leveraging UCD theories, subsequently, the first-stage research sought an optimal standalone 4D modelling prototype following a parallel design approach. At the second stage, it further investigated into a collaborative 4D modelling prototype using an iterative design. It adopted collaborative task analysis into the UI/interaction design extension for a collaborative prototype based on results obtained from the first stage. The final usability testing was performed on the collaborative prototype to evaluate the designed CSCW and UI in a controlled geographically dispersed teamwork situation.

Findings

The test results and user feedback verified their usability. It also disclosed design weaknesses in collaborators’ awareness and smooth tasks’ transitions for further enhancement.

Originality/value

The combination of CSCW and UCD theories is practical for designing collaborative 4D modelling. It can also benefit designs for collaborative modelling in other dimensions like cost analysis, sustainable design, facility management, etc. in building information modelling.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 191000