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Article
Publication date: 21 May 2019

Tess Bird

Drawing on ethnographic research in selection of urban households in Providence County, Rhode Island, the purpose of this paper is to define uncertainty as an everyday…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on ethnographic research in selection of urban households in Providence County, Rhode Island, the purpose of this paper is to define uncertainty as an everyday experience embedded in material and social worlds and explore the relationship of uncertainty to creative improvisation and well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

This research was anthropological and ethnographic, drawing on an everyday material culture approach to the home. Participant observation and interviews began in April 2015 and ended in April 2016. The data presented in derived from interview transcripts, field notes and photography.

Findings

Responses to uncertainty are embedded in habits and practices that help sustain well-being. During uncertain periods marked by transition, change and disappointment, participants draw on domestic practices as well as narrative frameworks to foster stability. Security, well-being, uncertainty, and improvisation emerge as an important intersection in everyday life.

Originality/value

This paper offers a perspective on uncertainty at the intimate level of the home, helping nuance the difference between collective creative improvisation and the economic expectation of individual adaptability.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

Keywords

Open Access

Abstract

Details

Designing Environments for People with Dementia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-974-8

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1997

Martha E. Williams and Daniel E. Bargard

This is the tenth article on social science, humanities, news and general databases in a continuing series of articles summarising and commenting on new database products…

Abstract

This is the tenth article on social science, humanities, news and general databases in a continuing series of articles summarising and commenting on new database products. There are two companion articles: one covering science, technology and medicine (STM) appeared in Online & CDROM Review, vol. 21, no. 4 and the other covering business and law (BSL) will appear in Online & CDROM Review, vol. 21, no. 6. The articles are based on the newly appearing database products in the Gale Directory of Databases. The Gale Directory of Databases (GDD) was created in January 1993 by merging Computer‐Readable Databases: A Directory and Data Sourcebook (CRD) together with the Directory of Online Databases (DOD) and the Directory of Portable Databases (DPD).

Details

Online and CD-Rom Review, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1353-2642

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2019

Wenxuan Li and Maria I. Marshall

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the factors associated with role satisfaction in farm and non-farm family businesses differ by gender of the business owner.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the factors associated with role satisfaction in farm and non-farm family businesses differ by gender of the business owner.

Design/methodology/approach

The data used are from a 30-minute telephone survey of owners of farm and non-farm family businesses in Indiana, Illinois, Michigan and Ohio. The sample consists of 627 small- and medium-size family businesses. Three ordered probit regressions are used to analyze role satisfaction.

Findings

Women’s participation in management and the number of family members in management are positively associated with women’s role satisfaction, while tension from resource competition is negatively associated with role satisfaction. In contrast, men’s role satisfaction is increased through high family business functioning and profit.

Practical implications

There is no difference in the level of role satisfaction between men and women when one controls for the owner, family and business characteristics. However, there is a difference in the factors that drive role satisfaction between men and women. This may be driven, in part, by what their roles are vis-à-vis the financial aspects of the business. Male and female business owners seem to focus on different aspects of their family business to achieve role satisfaction.

Originality/value

This paper determines the impact of gender on the role satisfaction of business owners of farm and non-farm family businesses in four Midwestern states. It identifies the different factors associated with role satisfaction for female and male family business owners based on their actual roles.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Fighting Corruption in the Public Sector
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-857-5

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1970

Barbara Brill

FRANK FRASER DARLING, in his compelling Reith lectures ‘Wilderness and Plenty’ that heralded European Conservation Year, warned us of the dangers of pollution and…

Abstract

FRANK FRASER DARLING, in his compelling Reith lectures ‘Wilderness and Plenty’ that heralded European Conservation Year, warned us of the dangers of pollution and over‐population. He spoke of overcrowding as ‘a depressant of beauty…and of the romantic spirit which is the pearl of our human heritage’. This romantic spirit that is manifested through our poets, writers, artists and musicians, seems to me to have been overlooked in the welter of propaganda that has been poured out, with the emphasis primarily on the scientific aspects of conservation.

Details

Library Review, vol. 22 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1928

AT the close of the year we look back upon twelve very chequered months in the story of librarianship. In the field of libraries as a whole, it may be said that they held…

Abstract

AT the close of the year we look back upon twelve very chequered months in the story of librarianship. In the field of libraries as a whole, it may be said that they held their own and indeed that some progress has been made. A few libraries have been opened, mostly branch libraries, but there have been extensions and re‐organisations of central libraries, which point to a universally developing regard for the library service. Even if this has not been dramatic in some places, it has nevertheless been real. Men who were middle‐aged before the war must, however, pass away before we get the right perspective for the conditions of to‐day; that is to say, with few exceptions. We are not speaking of librarians here, but of those who control libraries, but even librarians of the older school have sometimes found it difficult to envisage library service on the scale common in America, which, with adjustments to British circumstances, should be the scale for us throughout the Empire.

Details

New Library World, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1975

Natural selection—survival of the fittest—is as old as life itself. Applied genetics which is purposeful in contrast to natural selection also has a long history…

Abstract

Natural selection—survival of the fittest—is as old as life itself. Applied genetics which is purposeful in contrast to natural selection also has a long history, particularly in agriculture; it has received impetus from the more exacting demands of the food industry for animal breeds with higher lean : fat and meat : bone ratios, for crops resistant to the teeming world of parasites. Capturing the exquisite scent, the colours and form beautiful of a rose is in effect applied genetics and it has even been applied to man. For example, Frederick the Great, Emperor of Prussia, to maintain a supply of very tall men for his guards—his Prussian Guards averaged seven feet in height—ordered them to marry very tall women to produce offspring carrying the genes of great height. In recent times, however, research and experiment in genetic control, more in the nature of active interference with genetic composition, has developed sufficiently to begin yielding results. It is self‐evident that in the field of micro‐organisms, active interference or manipulations will produce greater knowledge and understanding of the gene actions than in any other field or by any other techniques. The phenomenon of “transferred drug resistance”, the multi‐factorial resistance, of a chemical nature, transferred from one species of micro‐organisms to another, from animal to human pathogens, its role in mainly intestinal pathology and the serious hazards which have arisen from it; all this has led to an intensive study of plasmids and their mode of transmission. The work of the Agricultural Research Council's biologists (reported elsewhere in this issue) in relation to nitrogen‐fixing genes and transfer from one organism able to fix nitrogen to another not previously having this ability, illustrates the extreme importance of this new field. Disease susceptibility, the inhibition of invasiveness which can be acquired by relatively “silent” micro‐organisms, a better understanding of virulence and the possible “disarming” of organisms, particularly those of particular virulence to vulnerable groups. Perhaps this is looking for too much too soon, but Escherichia coli would seem to offer more scope for genetic experiments than most; it has serotypes of much variability and viability; and its life and labours in the human intestine have assumed considerable importance in recent years. The virulence of a few of its serotypes constitute an important field in food epidemiology. Their capacity to transfer plasmids—anent transfer of drug resistance— to strains of other organisms resident in the intestines, emphasizes the need for close study, with safeguards.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 77 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1941

SEPTEMBER, as always, sees us contemplating our activities for the winter months. Exigencies of publishing compel us to write these notes a short time before that month…

Abstract

SEPTEMBER, as always, sees us contemplating our activities for the winter months. Exigencies of publishing compel us to write these notes a short time before that month begins, and our contemplation of things this year is coloured by the now rather remote possibility that September may bring the invasion that has been the shadow ahead for a year or more. To plan in a twilight time, as it were, is more than ordinarily difficult, and yet it is a commonsense and correct course to go on, not as if nothing could happen, but to the full extent of our means as they exist. Otherwise general paralysis would occur every time our statesmen warned us of possible attacks. There is no fear of such premature paralysis, however, as our people only want to be up and doing “with a heart for any date.”

Details

New Library World, vol. 44 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1962

He was a serious‐minded lad when he got his first appointment as an assistant in his local public library, and coming from a bookish family he revelled in the opportunity…

Abstract

He was a serious‐minded lad when he got his first appointment as an assistant in his local public library, and coming from a bookish family he revelled in the opportunity that stretched out before him on the seemingly endless shelves. Duly he was fortunate in finding seniors who were prepared to give him bookish guidance, and soon he was browsing in literature embodying the fascinating speculations of contemporary writers of enlightened thought such as Thomas Henry Huxley, Alfred Russel Wallace, and Herbert Spencer; and he was encouraged to make excursions into Swinburne, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Ernest Dowson and others of the then popular poets. The scientists kept him serious and thoughtful, the poets made him a romantic. He had little time for the reading of fiction, the best of which would have served to widen his rather limited social horizon. He attended lectures, and duly he lectured others. He was qualifying for a Grammarian's Funeral.

Details

Library Review, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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