Search results

1 – 10 of over 6000
Article
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Dari Alhuwail

This paper aims to gain insights about information management practices in public health-care organizations in Kuwait and offer recommendations to improve these practices.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to gain insights about information management practices in public health-care organizations in Kuwait and offer recommendations to improve these practices.

Design/methodology/approach

This study involves secondary analysis of quantitative and qualitative accreditation-related data pertaining to the compliance with the Information Management standard at seven public tertiary health-care facilities over two accreditation cycles.

Findings

Overall, organizations improved their compliance with the Information Management standard. However, issues exist with effectively and efficiently transmitting data, aggregating clinical and administrative data and using the information for both strategic planning and quality improvement initiatives.

Research limitations/implications

The analysed data set does not provide information about the improvements done between the accreditation cycles. Caution should be applied before assuming generalizability of the results, considering the context and social constructs around the health-care system is essential.

Practical implications

Compliance with predetermined criteria through accreditation can improve information management practices. Without proper management of information at health-care facilities, achieving safe and effective patient care is futile. The role of health information technology (IT) should not be sidelined; robust health IT solutions can help support good information management practices thereby improving care quality and aiding health-care reform.

Originality/value

Concerning information management, health-care organizations providing focused services have clear advantages over organizations providing general care services. Considering the type of care organization (general vs specialized) can provide insights into how information management practices can affect the operations of the organization.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

Neelu Puri, Anil Gupta, Arun K. Aggarwal and Vipin Kaushal

Outpatient departments (OPDs) need to monitor the quality of care and patient satisfaction for continuous quality improvement. Additionally, there is a need for an…

1081

Abstract

Purpose

Outpatient departments (OPDs) need to monitor the quality of care and patient satisfaction for continuous quality improvement. Additionally, there is a need for an increase in focused literature on patient satisfaction and quality of health care at a tertiary care level. The purpose of this paper is to attempt to fulfil this need.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross‐sectional hospital‐based study among OPD patients was undertaken, where investigators conducted interviews with 120 patients at entry (registration), 120 patients at the OPD clinic (60 doctor‐patient interactions and 60 exit interviews), and a further 120 patients at investigation facilities. Patient satisfaction, client convenience facilities, prescription quality, doctor‐patient interaction and other quality elements as described in the study were given score of 0 or 1.

Findings

At exit, 52 (86.6 percent) patients were satisfied with the OPD care. The mean total quality score was 80.9 percent of the total scores. It was above 90 percent of the total score for patient convenience facilities and for doctor‐patient interaction, 76 percent for the prescription quality of the doctors and 43.3 percent for signage display. The mean score for patient‐doctor interaction was found to be significantly lower (3.6/5) among dissatisfied patients compared to the satisfied patients (4.7/5). Satisfied patients reported a significantly higher consultation time (12.4 minutes) with a doctor compared to dissatisfied patients (8.5 minutes) (p=0.04).

Research limitations/implications

Not using a Likert scale to measure patient satisfaction could be considered a limitation. However, the authors also arrived at similar conclusions with their tools as with the use of Likert scales in other studies. Furthermore, findings are limited to medicine and surgery general OPDs in a tertiary care setting. Any interpretation beyond this frame may be done with caution.

Practical implications

Hospitals should encourage good patient‐doctor interaction as it has emerged as the key factor associated with patient satisfaction.

Social implications

Quality improvements in public sector health institutes can lead to better utilization of health care by the poor and compromised sections of society and can lead to a reduction in the inequity associated with health care.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils the need to evaluate quality of hospital care in public sector hospitals at the tertiary care level. The methods and tools used are simple and extensive enough to capture information at multiple service points.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 September 2020

Priscilla Anaba, Emmanuel Anongeba Anaba and Aaron Asibi Abuosi

Promoting patient satisfaction is crucial for healthcare quality improvement. However, literature on patient satisfaction with nursing care in Ghana is limited. The aim of…

Abstract

Purpose

Promoting patient satisfaction is crucial for healthcare quality improvement. However, literature on patient satisfaction with nursing care in Ghana is limited. The aim of this study was to assess patient satisfaction with perioperative nursing care in Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, the largest tertiary hospital in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was a cross-sectional study. A sample of one hundred (n = 100) in-patients in the surgical department were interviewed. Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS), version 22, was used to analyze the data. The results were presented using univariate, bivariate and multivariate analyses.

Findings

It was found that majority of the respondents were males (53%), employed (56%) and insured (85%). It was also found that eight in ten respondents were satisfied with the perioperative nursing care. Overall patient satisfaction with perioperative nursing care was significantly associated with information provision (p < 0.001), nurse–patient relationship (p < 0.001), fear and concern (p < 0.05) and discomfort and need (p < 0.05). At the multivariate level, overall patient satisfaction was significantly influenced by nurse–patient relationship (β = 0.430, p = 0.002).

Originality/value

There is limited literature on nursing care in surgical departments and rarely are patients' views considered in assessing quality of perioperative care, especially in Low- and Middle- Income Countries (LMICs). This study is a modest contribution to the literature on patient satisfaction with perioperative nursing care in Ghana.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 22 March 2021

Stuart Redding, Richard Hobbs, Catia Nicodemo, Luigi Siciliani and Raphael Wittenberg

Purpose: In this chapter, we examine the National Health Service (NHS) and Adult Social Care (ASC) in England, focussing on policies that have been introduced since 2000…

Abstract

Purpose: In this chapter, we examine the National Health Service (NHS) and Adult Social Care (ASC) in England, focussing on policies that have been introduced since 2000 and considering the challenges that providers face in their quest to provide a high standard and affordable health service in the near future.

Methodology/Approach: We discuss recent policy developments and published analysis covering innovations within major aspects of health care (primary, secondary and tertiary) and ASC, before considering future challenges faced by providers in England, highlighted by a 2017 UK Parliament Select Committee.

Findings: The NHS and ASC system have experienced tightening budgets and serious financial pressure, with historically low real-terms growth in health funding from central government and local authorities. Policymakers have tried to overcome these challenges with several policy innovations, but many still remain. With large-scale investment and reform, there is potential for the health and social care system to evolve into a modern service capable of dealing with the needs of an ageing population. However, if these challenges are not met, then it is set to continue struggling with a lack of appropriate facilities, an overstretched staff and a system not entirely appropriate for its patients.

Details

The Sustainability of Health Care Systems in Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-499-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 September 2019

Lorraine Abela, Adriana Pace and Sandra C. Buttigieg

Hospital length of stay (LOS) is not only a function of patient- and disease-related factors, but is also determined by other health system-wide variables. Managers and…

Abstract

Purpose

Hospital length of stay (LOS) is not only a function of patient- and disease-related factors, but is also determined by other health system-wide variables. Managers and clinicians strive to achieve the best possible trade-off between patients’ needs and efficient utilisation of hospital resources, while also embracing ethical decision making. The purpose of this paper is to explore the perceptions of the hospital’s major stakeholders as to what affects the duration of LOS of inpatients.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a data-triangulated case study approach, 50 semi-structured interviews were performed with management, doctors, nurses and patients. Additionally, the hospitals’ standard operating procedures, which are pertinent to the subject, were also included in the thematic analysis.

Findings

This study shows that LOS is a multi-dimensional construct, which results from a complex interplay of various inputs, processes and outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

The findings emerging from a single case study approach cannot be generalised across settings and contexts, albeit being in line with the current literature.

Practical implications

The study concludes that a robust hospital strategy, which addresses deficient organisational processes that may unnecessarily prolong LOS, is needed. Moreover, the hospital’s strategy must be sustained by providing good primary care facilities within the community set-up, as well as by providing more long-term care and rehabilitation beds to support the hospital turnover.

Originality/value

The subject of LOS in hospitals has so far been tackled in a fragmented manner. This paper provides a comprehensive and triangulated account of the complexities surrounding the duration in which patients are kept in hospital by key stakeholders, most of whom were hands-on in the day-to-day running of the hospital under study.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2019

Mitch Blair, Mariana Miranda Autran Sampaio, Michael Rigby and Denise Alexander

The Models of Child Health Appraised (MOCHA) project identified the different models of primary care that exist for children, examined the particular attributes that might…

Abstract

The Models of Child Health Appraised (MOCHA) project identified the different models of primary care that exist for children, examined the particular attributes that might be different from those directed at adults and considered how these models might be appraised. The project took the multiple and interrelated dimensions of primary care and simplified them into a conceptual framework for appraisal. A general description of the models in existence in all 30 countries of the EU and EEA countries, focusing on lead practitioner, financial and regulatory and service provision classifications, was created. We then used the WHO ‘building blocks’ for high-performing health systems as a starting point for identifying a good system for children. The building blocks encompass safe and good quality services from an educated and empowered workforce, providing good data systems, access to all necessary medical products, prevention and treatments, and a service that is adequately financed and well led. An extensive search of the literature failed to identify a suitable appraisal framework for MOCHA, because none of the frameworks focused on child primary care in its own right. This led the research team to devise an alternative conceptualisation, at the heart of which is the core theme of child centricity and ecology, and the need to focus on delivery to the child through the life course. The MOCHA model also focuses on the primary care team and the societal and environmental context of the primary care system.

Details

Issues and Opportunities in Primary Health Care for Children in Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-354-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 May 2022

Alok Kumar Samanta, Varaprasad G. and Anand Gurumurthy

Health care organisations implement lean six sigma (LSS) methodology to achieve improved performance in terms of cost, quality and productivity. However, the way it gets…

Abstract

Purpose

Health care organisations implement lean six sigma (LSS) methodology to achieve improved performance in terms of cost, quality and productivity. However, the way it gets implemented differs between organisations. Hence, this paper deal with a review of case studies describing the implementation of LSS in health care organisations to understand the nuances of implementation and identify future research directions.

Design/methodology/approach

The journal articles indexed in the Web of Science and Scopus database were filtered out. In total, 154 articles were evaluated using specific structural dimensions to categorise the literature into various groups, and content analysis was performed to synthesise the same.

Findings

This review revealed that the number of articles publishing the application of LSS in health care has been increasing in the last five years. Academic hospitals play a pivotal role to bridge the gap between LSS theory and practice. Despite this fact, certain themes remain unexplored. Not many studies are available that document the application of LSS in non-clinical areas such as pharmacy, internal logistics, maintenance and medical records. Only 20% of articles mentioned the post-intervention data up to three years, thus questioning the sustainability aspect of the achieved improvements.

Research limitations/implications

Various research gaps were identified, which can be used by the researchers to build the body of knowledge in the domain of LSS in health care.

Practical implications

This review provides a diversified view regarding the utility of LSS in the health care scenario. The findings will provide valuable insights for the health care practitioners regarding tools, techniques, drivers and performance measures.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to review only the case studies that describe the implementation of LSS in the health care sector.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Waleed M. S. Al‐Shaqha and Mohamed Zairi

Institutional pharmaceutical services have widely evolved over the past 20‐30 years. Hospital pharmacy practice has changed from a profession concerned chiefly with the…

3593

Abstract

Institutional pharmaceutical services have widely evolved over the past 20‐30 years. Hospital pharmacy practice has changed from a profession concerned chiefly with the bulk preparation and distribution of drug products to one centred on ensuring optimal drug therapy. Whereas hospital pharmacists were charged with maintaining large drug stock on nursing units, many of them now provide individualised patient therapies. The practice of hospital pharmacy has therefore become one encompassing all aspects of drug therapy, from the procurement of drugs and drug delivery devices, their preparation and distribution, to their most appropriate selection and use for each patient. Hospital pharmacy services have traditionally had little involvement at the key stages in patients’ hospital care. This leads to the conclusion that the model of clinical pharmacy practice adopted by many pharmacy department hospitals is no longer appropriate for the demands of today’s health‐care services. Reviews many new models proposed for clinical pharmacy practice including an integrated model for providing a pharmaceutical care management approach in the health‐care system. This model is a response to the failures of traditional drug therapy. It is primarily an idea about how health professionals and patient should integrate their work to obtain outcomes important to patients and clinicians.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 14 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 December 2019

Daniela Fishbein, Siddhartha Nambiar, Kendall McKenzie, Maria Mayorga, Kristen Miller, Kevin Tran, Laura Schubel, Joseph Agor, Tracy Kim and Muge Capan

Workload is a critical concept in the evaluation of performance and quality in healthcare systems, but its definition relies on the perspective (e.g. individual…

1050

Abstract

Purpose

Workload is a critical concept in the evaluation of performance and quality in healthcare systems, but its definition relies on the perspective (e.g. individual clinician-level vs unit-level workload) and type of available metrics (e.g. objective vs subjective measures). The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of objective measures of workload associated with direct care delivery in tertiary healthcare settings, with a focus on measures that can be obtained from electronic records to inform operationalization of workload measurement.

Design/methodology/approach

Relevant papers published between January 2008 and July 2018 were identified through a search in Pubmed and Compendex databases using the Sample, Phenomenon of Interest, Design, Evaluation, Research Type framework. Identified measures were classified into four levels of workload: task, patient, clinician and unit.

Findings

Of 30 papers reviewed, 9 used task-level metrics, 14 used patient-level metrics, 7 used clinician-level metrics and 20 used unit-level metrics. Key objective measures of workload include: patient turnover (n=9), volume of patients (n=6), acuity (n=6), nurse-to-patient ratios (n=5) and direct care time (n=5). Several methods for operationalization of these metrics into measurement tools were identified.

Originality/value

This review highlights the key objective workload measures available in electronic records that can be utilized to develop an operational approach for quantifying workload. Insights gained from this review can inform the design of processes to track workload and mitigate the effects of increased workload on patient outcomes and clinician performance.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 13 November 2018

Sharmin Majumder, Zannatul Najnin, Shamim Ahmed and Shafi Ullah Bhuiyan

Neonatal mortality rate is 24 deaths per 1,000 live births in Bangladesh and most of them die during early neonatal period. The purpose of this paper is to assess the…

8526

Abstract

Purpose

Neonatal mortality rate is 24 deaths per 1,000 live births in Bangladesh and most of them die during early neonatal period. The purpose of this paper is to assess the knowledge and attitude of neonatal care practices among postnatal mothers in a tertiary care hospital in order to provide a basis for the development of strategies to improve further.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional study was carried out in the Dhaka Medical College Hospital, Bangladesh using a convenient sampling technique. In total 211 postnatal mothers were interviewed using a structured questionnaire and χ2 test was used to analyze the data.

Findings

Among mothers, 37.9 percent were aged between 16–20 years; 16.1 percent had no institutional education; 55 percent were primipara and only 26.5 percent had attended antenatal visit for more than four times. Mothers had apparently good knowledge and attitude about thermoregulation, early initiation of breast-feeding, importance of providing colostrum to the newborn, exclusive breast-feeding (EBF) up to six months of age and immunization at birth. However, this study identified knowledge gap about cord care, eye care, first bathing and hygiene practices. Overall, only a small proportion of respondents had good level of knowledge (37 percent) and attitude (47.4 percent) on newborn care. Highly significant statistical association was found between the knowledge, attitude level and socio-demographic characteristics of respondents. Knowledge and attitude were strongly associated as well.

Research limitations/implications

There is scope for improvement by providing health education to antenatal and postnatal mothers. Therefore, implementation of the guidelines outlined in the Maternal and Child Handbook (MCH) is highly recommended.

Originality/value

There is scope for improvement by providing health education to antenatal and postnatal mothers. Therefore, implementation of the guidelines outlined in the MCH is highly recommended to enhance the knowledge and attitude on newborn care among postnatal mothers.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2586-940X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 6000