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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

Terry Rayner and Peter Goodge

Two forces of change in the field of assessment centres are described — change in company attitudes towards centres and a growing body of research which questions the…

Abstract

Two forces of change in the field of assessment centres are described — change in company attitudes towards centres and a growing body of research which questions the current thinking on the subject. How one organisation — London Regional Transport — responded by making what appears to be very beneficial changes in the way it runs some of its centres is examined. Its problems with feedback and the general inappropriateness of the traditional design for development applications are examined.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2007

Oluremi B. Ayoko

This research paper aims to advance the understanding of the circumstances under which diversity may be beneficial or detrimental for quality group process. Especially…

Abstract

Purpose

This research paper aims to advance the understanding of the circumstances under which diversity may be beneficial or detrimental for quality group process. Especially, the paper seeks to argue that communication openness is antecedent to the differing group members’ reactions to conflict events, which, in turn, are proposed to impact group's task and social outcomes in culturally diverse workgroups (CDWs).

Design/methodology/approach

Using social identity theory as the springboard, we built on existing literature to hypothesize the proposed relationships among variables. These relationships were tested quantitatively using multiple regression.

Findings

There are a couple of significant findings from the current research. Direct effects include groups with low levels of communication openness were linked with increased destructive reactions to conflict, bullying behaviors and emotional reactions to bullying; and destructive reactions to conflict were associated with emotional reactions to bullying. Moderating effects include: high levels of communication openness moderated high levels of productive reactions to conflict for decreased bullying behaviors in groups; communication openness made a difference on bullying when destructive reactions to conflict higher; and lower levels of communication openness moderated destructive reactions for increased emotional reactions to bullying.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited by its reliance on data that focused on primarily on cultural diversity consequently, the impact of gender, age, and other forms of diversity has not been controlled. Future research should consider the impact of age and other forms of diversity in teasing out the effect of communication openness on bullying behaviors.

Practical implications

The results from this study have implications for leaders of CDWs. A leader who is able to manage the reactions to conflict, especially destructive reactions to conflict by increasing communication openness may be able to reduce the perception of bullying behaviors and emotional reactions to bullying. These actions should, in turn, lead to increased group task outcomes.

Originality/value

First, this current paper is one of the first few studies that quantitatively examined bullying in organizational workgroups and in particular, culturally heterogeneous workgroups. Secondly, the paper is also one of the first few papers to examine the role of communication openness and reactions to conflict in workplace bullying and emotional reactions to bullying. Consequently, the paper will be useful for group members and managers as well as leaders of workgroups that experience conflict and bullying. Specifically, such leaders will need not only to manage conflict skillfully but also manage the group member's reaction to conflict to reduce bullying and emotions of bullying in their workgroups.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Melanie Bryant and Julie Wolfram Cox

This paper explores the retrospective construction of atrocity narratives of organizational change in primary industries of the Latrobe Valley, located in southeast…

Abstract

This paper explores the retrospective construction of atrocity narratives of organizational change in primary industries of the Latrobe Valley, located in southeast Australia. Within their narratives, participants discuss various forms of workplace violence aimed at employees by management and, in some cases, other employees. In addition, shifting narratives from violence to resignation are explored. As all participants are no longer employed in the organizations described in the narratives, causal associations between workplace violence and resignation choices are of particular interest. In this context, atrocity narratives are presented in a deliberate effort to extend the theorizing of organizational change into domains that are neither attractive nor progressive.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

Terry Hanstock, Shirley Day, Allan Bunch and Edwin Fleming

March 1989 has been designated Library Promotion Month with the intention of promoting the positive side of the library service at a time when it might be said to be under…

Abstract

March 1989 has been designated Library Promotion Month with the intention of promoting the positive side of the library service at a time when it might be said to be under threat from more negative forces. The idea is to involve as many people as possible — library workers, councillors, authors, trade unionists, and the general public, of course — in activities and events at local, national, and regional levels. These would include theme days on specific subjects (local history, services for the under‐fives etc.), lobbying, letter‐writing campaigns, public meetings and so forth. What we would hope for is that this combination of activities will focus the eyes and ears of the nation on the potential of libraries (or the potential that exists given a positive approach on the part of those in control of the coffers). We are given to understand that the Minister's long‐awaited response to the Green Paper and the comments it has provoked will be due round about the same period. With this in mind we want to be sure that libraries are higher up the agenda than usual when the Parliamentary implementation of whatever it is the Minister has in mind for libraries begins its process. (At the time of writing — Christmas Eve 1988 — it seems that enabling legislation will be tacked on to the next Housing Bill with secondary legislation in the form of Statutory Instruments being put before Parliament in the autumn. In other words, there is no time to lose.)

Details

New Library World, vol. 90 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2020

Lucy Zarina Campbell, Michael Pitt and Peter Mclennan

The experiment introduces nutritional labelling, healthier products and product placement designs to the hospital vending machines, to promote healthy lifestyles.

Abstract

Purpose

The experiment introduces nutritional labelling, healthier products and product placement designs to the hospital vending machines, to promote healthy lifestyles.

Design/methodology/approach

The site where this experiment happens is a major London hospital, serving over a million patients every year. In the experiment, the hospital’s snack and drink vending machines are redesigned. The impact on product sales are then analysed using robust statistical methods.

Findings

Nutritional labelling has a statistically significant impact on product sales. Less of the unhealthiest products are sold. Healthier products and product placement designs have a larger impact but with less statistical significance. They require further testing.

Research limitations/implications

Experts in service operations can use this experiment’s regression modelling methods. The methods are ideal for measuring change over time in counting data sets in complex real world environments.

Practical implications

There are suggestions for practical vending service change in this research. They are in line and add a practical example to Government policy guidance.

Social implications

People using the redesigned vending machines have more opportunity for healthy lifestyle choices.

Originality/value

The experiment provides statistical evidence in support of catering for healthier lifestyles.

Details

Facilities , vol. 39 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Gerard Hastings

This paper aims to present the problem of obesity and associated ill health in the UK. It seeks to show how marketing by major companies contributes to this problem.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the problem of obesity and associated ill health in the UK. It seeks to show how marketing by major companies contributes to this problem.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses the case study of “Terry” to illustrate the issues involved.

Findings

This paper finds that life expectancy is predicted to fall in the UK unless action is taken against the growth of obesity. The marketing of fast foods needs to be curtailed.

Originality/value

Ten pledges are made to “Terry” to improve his health, pledges that can be applied to the whole nation.

Details

Health Education, vol. 106 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1913

Inspections have been made during the year at the majority of the principal food importing ports in England and Wales in connection with the administration of the Public…

Abstract

Inspections have been made during the year at the majority of the principal food importing ports in England and Wales in connection with the administration of the Public Health (Foreign Meat) and the Public Health (Unsound Food) Regulations, 1908.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Abstract

Details

Using Interactive Digital Narrative in Science and Health Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-760-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1985

Phil Beaumont and John Leopold

Increasingly public sector industrial relations have become the central concern of governments, practitioners and academics. The main purpose of this monograph is to…

Abstract

Increasingly public sector industrial relations have become the central concern of governments, practitioners and academics. The main purpose of this monograph is to review key developments in public sector industrial relations, particularly during the period of the Thatcher Government. The emphasis is on the public services, especially local government, the NHS and the civil service. In the first section we review trends in public sector employment (particularly in the light of Government policy to reduce it), wages (in a context of cash limits), and strikes and other forms of industrial action. In the second part we move from “outcomes” to consider recent developments in the structure, organisation and policy of the “actors” in public sector industrial relations. In particular, we examine union organisation, developments in personnel management, bargaining structure, wage determination machinery and procedures, dispute resolution and privatisation initiatives. Developments in these areas are set in the context of the traditional features which distinguish public sector industrial relations from other spheres. In many of the areas under consideration, trends and developments set in train by the post‐1979 Conservative Government are still in the process of being worked out. Overall public sector employment has fallen, but with considerable variation around the average. National wage disputes, with considerable numbers of working days lost, have characterised the public sector since 1979, but the frequency of industrial conflict should not be exaggerated. There are moves to decentralise union and management structures, but the consequences of this have yet to be realised. Pay, however, remains problematic for government, employing authorities and unions. Since 1981–2, public sector settlements have generally been below the rate of inflation, but above the cash limit. The ad hoc policy of determining public sector pay by a mixture of review bodies, measures of comparability and market forces has created an overall picture of confusion. Establishing a fair and rational system of public sector pay remains a key task for any future government.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1989

Terry Hanstock, Ruth Kerns, Shirley Day, Edwin Fleming and Allan Bunch

Question: What do Scotland Yard's Black Museum, Raymond Brigg's Snowman, Welsh harpists, the East Lancashire Railway, and the Sensible Footwear Theatre Company have in common?

Abstract

Question: What do Scotland Yard's Black Museum, Raymond Brigg's Snowman, Welsh harpists, the East Lancashire Railway, and the Sensible Footwear Theatre Company have in common?

Details

New Library World, vol. 90 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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