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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2010

Ayomi Bandara, Terry Payne, David De Roure, Nicholas Gibbins and Tim Lewis

There has been an increased interest in the use of semantic description and matching techniques, to support service discovery and to overcome the limitations in the…

Abstract

Purpose

There has been an increased interest in the use of semantic description and matching techniques, to support service discovery and to overcome the limitations in the traditional syntactic approaches. However, the existing semantic matching approaches lack certain desirable properties that must be present in an effective solution to support service discovery. The purpose of this paper is to present a solution to facilitate the effective semantic matching of resource requests and advertisements in pervasive environments.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a semantic description and matching approach to facilitate resource discovery in pervasive environments; the approach includes a ranking mechanism that orders services according to their suitability and also considers priorities placed on individual requirements in a request.

Findings

The solution has been evaluated for its effectiveness and the results have shown that the matcher results agree reasonably well with human judgement. The solution was also evaluated for its efficiency/scalability and from the experimental results obtained, it can be observed that for most practical situations, matching time can be considered acceptable for reasonable numbers of advertisements and request sizes.

Originality/value

The proposed approach improves existing semantic matching solutions in several key aspects. Specifically; it presents an effective approximate matching and ranking criterion and incorporates priority consideration in the matching process. As shown in the evaluation experiments, these features significantly improve the effectiveness of semantic matching.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Alex M. Andrew

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Abstract

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Kybernetes, vol. 32 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1984

Trevor Watkins

Examines the potential of predictive models in the product testing stage of new product development. Draws on experience gained from a series of interviews with senior…

Abstract

Examines the potential of predictive models in the product testing stage of new product development. Draws on experience gained from a series of interviews with senior managers in the marketing departments of advertising and market research agencies and manufacturers of fast‐moving goods in the confectionery industry. Aims to give insight into the practical problems and acceptability of such models. Identifies alternatives to the models by examining problems in new product development. Reveals that no standard approaches are common in the confectionery industry especially and suggests that evidence militates against the use of models in the product testing stage of new product development.

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European Journal of Marketing, vol. 18 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

Harriet Bradley

The last two decades have been difficult times for trade unions, faced with declining membership, adverse public opinion and erosion of their powers through restrictive…

Abstract

The last two decades have been difficult times for trade unions, faced with declining membership, adverse public opinion and erosion of their powers through restrictive government legislation. Economic restructuring and the decline of heavy industry have deprived the union movement of its firmest traditional basis of support, while the most dominant growth area of the economy, private services, is resistant to union organization. In the face of this hostile economic and political climate, most unions have acknowledged the need to reconsider and reform their existing structures, policies and practices. Options available may include developing a more professionalised approach, offering members a range of financial and technical services calculated to appeal to their individual needs. Alternatively unions may seek to retain their traditional collectivist stance, attempting to find ways to get their members more involved in active campaigning. Both these approaches, however, would involve a recognition of the need to cater more effectively for members' needs, especially those members who often have been marginalized in the past; in the words of the General Secretary of the TGWU, unions must now cater for “the problems and aspirations of temporary and part‐time workers, young people and members of ethnic minorities who have, quite frankly, been neglected in the past.” (quoted Payne, 1989).

Details

Management Research News, vol. 16 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2016

William Wales and Fariss-Terry Mousa

This study presents evidence concerning the effects of affective and cognitive rhetoric on the underpricing of firms at the time of their initial public offering. It is…

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1728

Abstract

This study presents evidence concerning the effects of affective and cognitive rhetoric on the underpricing of firms at the time of their initial public offering. It is suggested that firms that use less affective, and more cognitively oriented discourse in their IPO prospectus will experience better underpricing outcomes. We examine these assertions using a sample of young high-tech IPO firms where investors rely on prospectuses as accurate and informative firm communications. Results from a robust five-year time span observe initial support for the hypothesized effects. Moreover, the signaling of a higher degree of entrepreneurial orientation in the firm prospectus is found to worsen the negative effects of affective discourse

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Book part
Publication date: 13 July 2017

Alberto R. Melgoza, Neal M. Ashkanasy and Oluremi B. Ayoko

Based on a model of employee personal gender self-categorization, we examine the relationships between prejudicial attitudes and experiences of aggression in a…

Abstract

Based on a model of employee personal gender self-categorization, we examine the relationships between prejudicial attitudes and experiences of aggression in a male-dominated workplace. Data collected from 603 employees in a male-dominated global workplace revealed that individuals who self-categorize as either males or females experience differential powerful emotions. Additionally, we found that the more anger experienced by employees who self-categorize either as males or females, the stronger their female prejudicial attitudes. In contrast, we found that contempt was negatively associated with female prejudicial attitudes; that is, the more contempt experienced by employees who self-categorize either as males or females, the weaker their female prejudicial attitudes.

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Emotions and Identity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-438-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Graham Dietz, John Cullen and Alan Coad

The purpose of this paper is to explore a number of issues pertaining to the conceptualisation, operationalisation, feasibility and effectiveness of workplace partnership…

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4666

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore a number of issues pertaining to the conceptualisation, operationalisation, feasibility and effectiveness of workplace partnership arrangements in a non‐unionised setting.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses the most common definitions of partnership to discern whether scope exists for non‐unionised forms. It then presents a detailed case study, based on 38 semi‐structured interviews with 29 interviewees, inside a non‐unionised company to analyse whether its people management arrangements conform with the definitions presented, and to examine the employees’ experience of those arrangements.

Findings

The paper notes that most partnership definitions can accommodate non‐unionised forms, if the arrangements for people management inside such firms meet certain standards on employee voice mechanisms and the exchange of mutual gains. The evidence from the case study suggests that its unusual policies and practices do conform with a viable model of non‐unionised partnership – albeit with some reservations. The benefits and concerns are discussed in the paper.

Research implications/limitations

The paper presents a credible definition and observable operationalisation of partnership for researchers to adopt. It encourages future research on the extent to which so‐called “partnership” organisations, including non‐union enterprises, comply and suggests comparative research between paired unionised and non‐unionised cases. However, it is limited to one case study.

Originality/value

The paper's primary value is in its extension of the partnership debate beyond its current “union‐only ghetto” into examining non‐unionised forms, as well. The case study is also unique in the literature as an example of non‐unionised partnership.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Angela J. Martin, Elizabeth S. Jones and Victor J. Callan

The purpose of this paper is to confirm predictions that employee reports of psychological climate, appraisals of change and levels of adjustment during a change programme…

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3937

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to confirm predictions that employee reports of psychological climate, appraisals of change and levels of adjustment during a change programme would be more positive for employees in higher status groups (operationalized as hierarchical level in the organization and occupational role).

Design/methodology/approach

Two questionnaire studies were conducted and data were analysed using Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA). Study one examined differences among 669 public sector employees as a function of status (organizational hierarchal level). Study two examined differences among 732 hospital employees as a function of role (occupational group) and status (managerial responsibility).

Findings

The results of study one revealed that upper level staff reported more positive attitudes during change, across a range of indicators. The results of study two showed that non‐clinical staff reported more negative attitudes during change than other occupational groups. In addition, managers appraised change as more stressful than non‐managers, but felt more in control of the situation.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of the paper is the cross sectional and self‐report nature of measurement. Future research could utilize a longitudinal design and collect alternative sources of data to indicate the constructs of interest, e.g. supervisor ratings of employee adjustment during change.

Practical implications

Together, the results of both studies highlighted the importance of implementing change management interventions that are targeted at the sub‐group level.

Originality/value

The findings of the paper add empirical evidence to the emerging literature on group differences in adjustment during organizational change. The paper will be of interest to academics and practicing managers, particularly those concerned with the effective management of change programmes.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Gracie Irvine, Natasha Pauli, Renata Varea and Bryan Boruff

The Ba River catchment and delta on the island of Viti Levu, Fiji, supports a wealth of livelihoods and is populated by diverse communities who are living with an…

Abstract

The Ba River catchment and delta on the island of Viti Levu, Fiji, supports a wealth of livelihoods and is populated by diverse communities who are living with an increased frequency and intensity of hydro-meteorological hazards (floods, cyclones and droughts). Participatory mapping as part of focus group discussions is a tool that can be used to elucidate communities’ understanding of the differing impacts of multiple hazards, as well as the strategies used to prepare and respond to different hazards. In this chapter, the authors present the results of qualitative research undertaken with members of three communities along the Ba River, from the Nausori highlands to the coastal mangroves, with a particular focus on recent floods (2009, 2012) and Tropical Cyclone Winston (2016). The communities draw on a wide range of livelihood strategies from fishing and agriculture to tourism and outside work. Natural hazard events vary in their impact on these livelihood strategies across the landscape and seascape, so that community members can adjust their activities accordingly. The temporal ‘signatures’ of ongoing impacts are also variable across communities and resources. The results suggest that taking a broad, landscape (and seascape) approach to understanding how communities draw livelihoods is valuable in informing effective and inclusive adaptation strategies for environmental change. Furthermore, documenting how the landscape is used in a mapped output may be a valuable tool for future social impact assessment for resource extraction activities.

Details

Climate-Induced Disasters in the Asia-Pacific Region: Response, Recovery, Adaptation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-987-8

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Book part
Publication date: 1 February 2007

Ruth N. Bolton and Crina O. Tarasi

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1306-6

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