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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2008

Stephen Schneider and Christine Hurst

This paper aims to explore some of the problems that arise in the execution of a joint force operation (JFO) involving various law enforcement agencies. Particular…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore some of the problems that arise in the execution of a joint force operation (JFO) involving various law enforcement agencies. Particular emphasis is placed on examining factors that impede inter‐agency cooperation and coordination in the context of a JFO targeting serious and major crimes.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is informed by primary research that assessed the level of satisfaction of enforcement agencies involved in a Canadian‐based multi‐agency task force mandated to combat organized crime. Research for this study entailed a questionnaire survey of, and semi‐structured interviews with, operational and supervisory personnel assigned to the JFO, as well senior management within agencies participating in the JFO.

Findings

The research uncovered significant differences in the level of satisfaction with the execution of the JFO concept between members from the lead (federal) enforcement agency and those of other participating (municipal and provincial) agencies. The majority of survey participants overwhelmingly believe that the integrated, multi‐agency approach is an essential ingredient in the effectiveness of this JFO. However, among respondents from participating agencies there was a high rate of dissatisfaction with intelligence dissemination and sharing by the JFO, communication between the JFO and member agencies, and the contribution the JFO makes to the priorities and outputs of participating agencies in their own jurisdictions.

Practical implications

These problems strike at the very heart of a multi‐agency approach to major crimes enforcement and can be generalized to other jurisdictions and countries. Indeed, impediments to the timely sharing of criminal intelligence continue to constitute one of the most significant obstacles to inter‐agency cooperation and coordination, and, by extension, the optimal enforcement of organized crime and terrorism. The problems addressed in this study should be of concern to any manager of a multi‐agency task force, and similar research is recommended to unearth problems that may undermine inter‐agency cooperation and plague the effectiveness of a JFO.

Originality/value

Despite the increased prevalence and importance of multi‐agency operations in combating major and serious crimes, little research has been conducted into the issues and problems that obstruct inter‐agency cooperation within this context. This paper represents one attempt to fill this void.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 15 June 2018

Theresa Goecke, Björn Michaelis and Lars Schweizer

Firms pursue merger and acquisitions in order to gain valuable resources from acquired companies, including employee-held know-how and culture. This study aims to identify…

Abstract

Firms pursue merger and acquisitions in order to gain valuable resources from acquired companies, including employee-held know-how and culture. This study aims to identify reasons employees choose to stay or leave in reaction to acquisitions. Seventeen employees involved in two major acquisitions in the software industry were interviewed for this qualitative study that goes beyond classical turnover variables to indicate that turnover or retention decisions depend on highly critical acquisition-specific variables such as leadership behavior, contact with new colleagues, or appreciation from the acquirer. We develop an acquisition-specific turnover model as a basis for further research on acquisition-specific turnover and to provide guidelines for practitioners dealing with retention and turnover during acquisitions.

Details

Advances in Mergers and Acquisitions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-136-6

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Chris Senior, Colm Fearon, Heather Mclaughlin and Saranzaya Manalsuren

The purpose of this paper is to understand the nature of staff/employee (i.e. learning and teaching, curriculum support and administrative staff) perceptions, anxieties…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the nature of staff/employee (i.e. learning and teaching, curriculum support and administrative staff) perceptions, anxieties and worries about early merger change in the UK further education (FE) sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 128 out of 562 employees to examine perceptions of psychological contract (post-merger announcement) on an FE college in England. Paired t-tests were used to analyse quantitative data. Additionally, a content analysis of open-ended questions was incorporated as part of a combined methods survey evaluation approach for discussion and triangulation purposes.

Findings

Quantitative results from t-tests showed there had been a decrease in the perception of fulfilled obligations in nine of the ten areas of the psychological contract. Qualitative results indicated that communications, job security and uncertainty were common negative outcomes post-merger announcement. Implications for education managers from the case study include: a need for improved organizational communication; developing trust and mentorship for greater employee support, as well as; promoting further employee training and new opportunities for teamwork.

Research limitations/implications

Psychological contract theories for evaluating organizational change are useful given the recent interest in sharing public services and institutional mergers in the UK. This research demonstrates the benefits of using psychological contract, as well as how to apply such an evaluation for understanding staff concerns.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates a usable (psychological contract) survey evaluation approach for studying the impact of early merger change on staff in the FE, or higher education sectors in the UK (or elsewhere).

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2011

Anna A. Łupina‐Wegener, Susan C. Schneider and Rolf van Dick

Building on social identity theory, the purpose of this paper is to present a study on the socio‐cultural integration process in a merger of two European pharmaceutical…

Abstract

Purpose

Building on social identity theory, the purpose of this paper is to present a study on the socio‐cultural integration process in a merger of two European pharmaceutical subsidiaries in Mexico. The paper investigates antecedents of perceived threat to pre‐merger identities in an officially claimed “merger‐of‐equals”.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed‐methods approach was adopted comprising semi‐structured interviews (with 37 interview partners) and standardized employee surveys with 890 respondents.

Findings

Findings indicate that identity of the new organization was largely shared among members of the different subgroups. Though the employees considered their pre‐merger identities to be at stake (as demonstrated through the interviews), this experienced threat was not very strongly expressed in the survey. In fact, the sub‐groups were able to maintain distinctiveness, acknowledge the value added of each group, and had access to resources.

Research limitations/implications

The main study limitation concerns the fact that this research was conducted using a cross‐sectional design. It would be interesting in future research to observe the processes as they unfold over time.

Practical implications

The paper's findings may help managers and change agents to understand that within merger partners, subgroups exist and different concerns in terms of their identity may emerge.

Originality/value

The results shed light on how shared identity in the new organization can successfully develop despite different perceptions of the integration process of members from the acquired and the acquiring groups. In contrast to past research findings on M&As, positive results were achieved despite contradictory perceptions of integration process of members of the acquired and the acquiring groups.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Book part
Publication date: 27 June 2017

Muriel Mignerat and Katty Marmenout

Cultural, social, and psychological perspectives on mergers assume conflict to be an important mediator of post-merger outcomes. Yet, despite a growing literature on the…

Abstract

Cultural, social, and psychological perspectives on mergers assume conflict to be an important mediator of post-merger outcomes. Yet, despite a growing literature on the human side of mergers, conflict in mergers remains poorly understood.

Based on the disputing perspective and negotiated order theory, a contextual and dynamic approach is presented along with propositions to guide future empirical research in the form of a process model of post-merger order negotiation.

When negotiating the post-merger order, different issues emerge that are embedded in the broader context of the merger.

Adopting this theoretical framework allows us to understand the intergroup dynamics and antagonistic behavior observed in mergers.

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

Terry O'Brien

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2010

Terry O'Brien

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 January 2007

Terry O'Brien

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

Kieran Cronin and Terry O'Brien

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate that in increasingly financially constrained times, libraries do not require prerequisite specialised marketing expertise to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate that in increasingly financially constrained times, libraries do not require prerequisite specialised marketing expertise to promote their institution and its services successfully by engaging in cost effective marketing initiatives. It also aims to highlight the potential and importance of marketing to enhance services, communicate services and improve library visibility.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study is undertaken of the marketing experiences of Waterford Institute of Technology (WIT) Libraries, a small to medium‐sized, publicly funded education institute in South‐East Ireland. The paper details a series of low‐cost, practical marketing measures undertaken by WIT Libraries over the period 2007‐2008, and contextualises them for a collective audience.

Findings

WIT Libraries are engaged in a wide range of marketing initiatives, adopting traditional means and Web 2.0 technologies where possible to increase the library's exposure and the services it offers. Predominantly these marketing initiatives do not require a significant financial investment and can be implemented utilising existing library resources in terms of staff expertise and facilities. A “one size fits” all approach does not work for all libraries. Specific marketing techniques can be tailored to suit individual libraries and their users' needs. The authors contend that a range of low‐cost initiatives can be used to successfully promote library services amongst users and the wider community. Further mid‐term evaluation may be necessary.

Originality/value

The paper illustrates with concrete examples how a library with no specialised marketing expertise can adapt to the prevailing financial climate, to engage in cost effective initiatives and promote itself and its services successfully. The article will be of value to similar sized and similarly resourced libraries as a basis for engaging in low‐cost effective marketing initiatives.

Details

New Library World, vol. 110 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2009

Terry O'Brien

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

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