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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Terry Finlow‐Bates

Deming (1986) was quite adamant that any attempt to reward the individual for supposed personal contribution in the workplace was wrong. This flies in the face of the belief that…

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Abstract

Deming (1986) was quite adamant that any attempt to reward the individual for supposed personal contribution in the workplace was wrong. This flies in the face of the belief that it is right and proper to reward a person for work well done. It is totally counter‐intuitive to a boss who is trying to motivate his or her people. Of course we must reward our high achievers. Even Harrington (1998), warning that “this is worse than taking the Lord’s name in vain”, felt that Deming had probably got it wrong.  However, Deming, building on the work of Taylor and Shewhart, realised just how little influence most of us have on the final business result. Deming argued that for most people, most of the time, the final result is beyond their control and thus their influence. Rewarding them for success or punishing them for failure is neither fair nor logical. This article examines the basis of Deming’s unequivocal views and concludes, painful as it might be, that Deming had it right – at least most (99.75 per cent) of the time.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

Claire Bates, Louise Terry and Keith Popple

The purpose of this paper is to understand some of the barriers people with learning disabilities experience with regards to relationships and consider the possible changes…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand some of the barriers people with learning disabilities experience with regards to relationships and consider the possible changes professionals could make to address these.

Design/methodology/approach

The current paper will draw on case studies extracted from Bates et al. (2016), using them to illustrate a number of themes/issues that relate to the support that people with learning disabilities received and needed from staff to develop and maintain relationships.

Findings

People with learning disabilities continue to experience barriers with regards to relationships. Their rights and choices are not always respected and a climate of risk aversion persists in areas such as sexual relationships. The research highlighted the balancing act staff must engage in to ensure that they remain supportive without being controlling or overprotective of individuals in relationships.

Research limitations/implications

Professional/support provider views were not included but these could have lent an additional perspective to the issues discussed.

Practical implications

An increased understanding of human rights entitlements should be encouraged among people with learning disabilities so they know when their freedom is being unlawfully restricted. Sexuality and relationship training would be beneficial for support staff. This could cover a wider range of areas such as contraception and supporting individuals who have experienced sexual/domestic abuse in starting new relationships.

Originality/value

This paper explores the barriers to relationships from the perspective of people with learning disabilities and offers practical solutions to address them.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Dick de Kievit and Terry Finlow‐Bates

Describes a well‐tested, simple visual aid for determining where a company stands in its TQM implementation process. Provides an example of the “process‐matrix”, discussing the…

Abstract

Describes a well‐tested, simple visual aid for determining where a company stands in its TQM implementation process. Provides an example of the “process‐matrix”, discussing the basic elements for quality in terms of commitment, organization, training, system mapping, projects, quality assurance certification, customers and writing work instructions.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1993

Terry Bates

Examines training by external mentors and its effects on managementeducation. Suggests that it is complementary and supportive of all othertraining methods, since it encourages…

519

Abstract

Examines training by external mentors and its effects on management education. Suggests that it is complementary and supportive of all other training methods, since it encourages the practice of skills learned through formal training. Explains how external mentoring works – by assessing an individual′s skills to date and arriving at an agreed agenda on which to work. Concludes that external mentoring allows people to develop to the extent of their own capabilities.

Details

Management Development Review, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0962-2519

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1992

Terry Finlow‐Bates

Suggests that the basic faith‐driven religion of TQM is not enough, but what is necessary is the back‐up of understanding gained from the TQM equivalent of the theory of…

Abstract

Suggests that the basic faith‐driven religion of TQM is not enough, but what is necessary is the back‐up of understanding gained from the TQM equivalent of the theory of evolution. Discusses the shortcomings of three commonly used approaches to setting up and distributing internal services and posits solutions to the problems.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1990

Terry Finlow‐Bates

Explains how concept mapping taken from the educational world, can help clarify the mess. Asserts that combining this tool with a preliminary step goes a long way towards creating…

Abstract

Explains how concept mapping taken from the educational world, can help clarify the mess. Asserts that combining this tool with a preliminary step goes a long way towards creating the consensus and harmony essential to the production of acceptable practical solutions. Contends concept maps provide a firm structure for carrying out discussions, negotiations and agreements. Concludes, when trying to achieve a quality improvement, all variables in multitudinous combinations are open for effecting the improvement. A concept map can do much to help visualize the tangle.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 2 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1991

Terry Finlow‐Bates

Argues that a TQM programme can reduce the COPQ (cost of poor quality) by between 20% and 40 per cent. Suggests benchmarking is the first step to estimate an organisation′s…

Abstract

Argues that a TQM programme can reduce the COPQ (cost of poor quality) by between 20% and 40 per cent. Suggests benchmarking is the first step to estimate an organisation′s minimum level of waste by comparing itself with the market leader in its sector, then to examine long‐term performance indicators, bringing in intangibles such as training and skills. Uses graphs to portray the evolution of the window of opportunity for TQM and examines the consequences of non‐optimum strategies. In a series of relatively complex examples, it concludes that waste is waiting to be retrieved by a quality programme.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 3 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Terry Finlow‐Bates, Bert Visser and Christine Finlow‐Bates

Successful total quality management (TQM) is dependent on first class problem solving. Numerous techniques have been created to help the TQM practitioner along the problem solving…

3090

Abstract

Successful total quality management (TQM) is dependent on first class problem solving. Numerous techniques have been created to help the TQM practitioner along the problem solving journey. However, it can be very difficult to decide which of these techniques should or could be used at any point in the journey and in particular to see how the different approaches are related to each other. As a result, most people use only a small number of these techniques and tend to cling to their own limited toolbox. Three of the strongest groups of tools are “the seven simple tools of TQM”, “the four thinking models of Kepner‐Tregoe” and “root cause analysis”. This article argues that all three are complementary to each other and provides a flow chart to help navigate between them. This is particularly relevant for programmes aimed at implementing total productive manufacturing/maintenance (TPM).

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

Terry Bates

Reports on a recent survey by GHN Career Management Consultants whosuggest companies are not making the best use of high fliers. Provides amethod of identification of high fliers…

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Abstract

Reports on a recent survey by GHN Career Management Consultants who suggest companies are not making the best use of high fliers. Provides a method of identification of high fliers, both practical and attitudinal and supplies development plans, such as learning in groups and mentoring. Concludes that for high flier development, individual reaction to formal or informal learning should be taken into account to develop a full range of styles.

Details

Management Development Review, vol. 7 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0962-2519

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

T. Finlow‐Bates

Explains a mathematical solution ‐ catastrophe theory ‐ may help to shed light on the pitfalls of reorganisation. Argues that organisational failures are not always the result of…

Abstract

Explains a mathematical solution ‐ catastrophe theory ‐ may help to shed light on the pitfalls of reorganisation. Argues that organisational failures are not always the result of human failures and goes on to demonstrate that there can be far more complex reasons. Provides a number of useful applications of catastrophe theory that could aid the future development of an effective improvement strategy.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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1 – 10 of 210