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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2010

Rabi S. Bhagat, Balaji Krishnan, Terry A. Nelson, Karen Moustafa Leonard, David L. Ford and Tejinder K. Billing

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the moderating roles of two distinct styles of coping and decision latitude on the relationship between three facets of role…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the moderating roles of two distinct styles of coping and decision latitude on the relationship between three facets of role stress and psychological strain in six national contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

The objective of the research is to examine the relative predictive efficacies of three theory specific moderators in six countries which differ on the cultural dimension of individualism‐collectivism. The data are analyzed using moderated regression analysis.

Findings

The results show that problem‐focused coping is a better moderator in the individualistic countries and that emotion‐focused coping is a better moderator in the collectivistic contexts. None of the three moderators moderate the relationships in Germany and South Africa – the two countries which had scores in the mid‐range of the individualism‐collectivism continuum. Findings are discussed for their significance into the interplay of cultural variations and coping with work stress in predicting psychological strain or distress on the job.

Practical implications

Practical implications for managing human resources in various subsidiaries of multinational and global organizations are discussed.

Originality/value

This paper confirms existing theories and expands the authors’ understanding of role stress and psychological strain in different cultural contexts.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2010

Ronald J. Burke

This paper aims to raise some important questions for cross‐cultural research on occupational stress and well‐being and sets the stage for the five papers in the special issue.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to raise some important questions for cross‐cultural research on occupational stress and well‐being and sets the stage for the five papers in the special issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews some previous literature on cross‐cultural understanding of occupational stress and well‐being, why such research is difficult to undertake, and summarizes the five original manuscripts that comprise this special issue.

Findings

Manuscripts in this special issue represent authors from several countries and report data collected from over a dozen countries. Some contributions attempt to replicate previous North American and European research findings in other countries while others undertake comparative studies of two or more countries.

Originality/value

It is important to undertake more cross‐cultural comparative research of the effects of occupational stress and well‐being to determine whether any boundary conditions exist for previous results based in North American and European samples. In addition, future research should include assessments of some national culture values.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 February 2012

Abstract

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Book part
Publication date: 14 September 2017

Joel West

Theories of platform strategy and adoption have been largely derived from studies of their application in the information and communications technology (ICT) sector. These…

Abstract

Theories of platform strategy and adoption have been largely derived from studies of their application in the information and communications technology (ICT) sector. These platforms vary in openness, with the model of open source software providing the best-known exemplar for open platforms.

This exploratory field study examines the degree to which nine attributes of ICT platforms are applicable to open platforms in biotechnology. Using a combination of interview and secondary data, it identifies three patterns of such biotechnology platforms – IP commons, hackerspaces, and crowdsourced patient registries – and the degree to which these nine attributes apply. It shows the impact of ICT platforms and open source software on open source approaches to biotechnology, and how the latter are affected by the technical, legal, and institutional differences between information technology and biotechnology.

Instead of open source software platforms organized around modular interfaces, complements, ecosystems, and two-sided markets, this study instead suggests a model of open source knowledge platforms which benefits from economies of scale but not indirect network effects. From this, it discusses the generalizability of the ICT-derived models of open source platforms and offers suggestions for future research.

Details

Entrepreneurship, Innovation, and Platforms
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-080-8

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Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2015

Joseph Calvin Gagnon and Brian R. Barber

Alternative education settings (AES; i.e., self-contained alternative schools, therapeutic day treatment and residential schools, and juvenile corrections schools) serve…

Abstract

Alternative education settings (AES; i.e., self-contained alternative schools, therapeutic day treatment and residential schools, and juvenile corrections schools) serve youth with complicated and often serious academic and behavioral needs. The use of evidence-based practices (EBPs) and practices with Best Available Evidence are necessary to increase the likelihood of long-term success for these youth. In this chapter, we define three primary categories of AES and review what we know about the characteristics of youth in these schools. Next, we discuss the current emphasis on identifying and implementing EBPs with regard to both academic interventions (i.e., reading and mathematics) and interventions addressing student behavior. In particular, we consider implementation in AES, where there are often high percentages of youth requiring special education services and who have a significant need for EBPs to succeed academically, behaviorally, and in their transition to adulthood. We focus our discussion on: (a) examining approaches to identifying EBPs; (b) providing a brief review of EBPs and Best Available Evidence in the areas of mathematics, reading, and interventions addressing student behavior for youth in AES; (c) delineating key implementation challenges in AES; and (d) providing recommendations for how to facilitate the use of EBPs in AES.

Details

Transition of Youth and Young Adults
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-933-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Terri R. Kurtzberg, Linda M. Dunn‐Jensen and Crystal L.Z. Matsibekker

Using a four‐person email negotiation on a fictitious house‐sale as the context, this study explores the effects of (1) familiarity and similarity manipulations on…

Abstract

Using a four‐person email negotiation on a fictitious house‐sale as the context, this study explores the effects of (1) familiarity and similarity manipulations on agent‐agent relationships, and (2) the emotional attachments that novice agents and principals form and maintain over the course of a single negotiation. Results show that only agent‐agent pairs receiving both manipulations (similarity and familiarity) were uniquely more successful in achieving an agreement, and that positive feelings for novice agents begin aligned with the principal and end aligned with the other agent. This demonstrates that relationship‐building in the online environment may be easier for some partnerships than for others, and that the dual‐loyalty conflict facing agents seems to encourage one partnership being preferred to the other at any one point in time. Implications for theory and for email negotiations are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2008

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Being named your country's most admired company is a feather in anyone's cap. Receiving such an accolade in three out of four years is the stuff dreams are made of. But fantasy or not, that's precisely what UK grocer Tesco has recently achieved to culminate a decade of phenomenal success under the leadership of Sir Terry Leahy. The retail giant has cornered 30 percent of the UK grocery market, a figure which is almost double the combined share of nearest rivals Asda and Sainsbury's. Overseas sales are growing even faster. Throw in soaring profits for its online business and a huge rise in non‐food sales and the picture becomes rosier still. So what enables Tesco to stand out from the crowd? – its people, for a start. There is widespread acceptance that a company's most prized asset is its workforce. Yet that does not stop many organizations paying little more than lip service in response. Not Tesco. People matter to the extent that the company's people strategy forms an integral part of the overall business plan instead of being regarded as something to bolt on afterwards.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

L. B Steven

Academic discussion of leasing has sought to provide possible explanations for its widespread use. Generally, taxation is regarded as the dominant factor in the decision…

Abstract

Academic discussion of leasing has sought to provide possible explanations for its widespread use. Generally, taxation is regarded as the dominant factor in the decision to lease. Myers, Diil & Bautista, prominent in the area of lease evaluation, came to the conclusion that the tax benefit of leasing seemed to be

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 15 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Book part
Publication date: 12 June 2018

Zanita E. Fenton

This chapter contributes to the discourse of difference by problematizing the sameness/difference trope through the lens of the exceptional. It explores the nature of…

Abstract

This chapter contributes to the discourse of difference by problematizing the sameness/difference trope through the lens of the exceptional. It explores the nature of being exceptional with an expectation that its nature is contingent and variable. At the heart of understanding what constitutes exceptional is its implicit comparison with the average. While exceptional is defined to include both individuals who achieve in extraordinary ways and individuals with a physical or mental impairment, the two definitions are consonant in that both describe individuals who deviate from expected norms. Relying on the insights from pragmatism, this chapter considers community habits exceptional individuals must confront in forming their choices. In this way, it further adheres to the lessons from pragmatism for norm change. The strategies individuals use to alter the effects of being perceived as exceptional contribute to the overall discourse in equality and equal protection and potentially constitute the individual action that formulates change. It examines some approaches to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) derived from civil rights and from economic perspectives and the relevant matrix of choices available to the exceptional to understand the potential for productive change. With this foreground, it examines the choice of exceptional individuals to cover or convey matters of their identity. This chapter pays particular attention to these choices in seeking accommodations under the ADA. Ultimately, this study strives to participate in the conversation seeking to maximize human potential.

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Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2016

Reed E. Nelson, Anderson Santana and Matthew S. Wood

Entrepreneurship involves complex interactions between individuals and environments but there is little research on these dynamics. We address this gap by conducting an

Abstract

Entrepreneurship involves complex interactions between individuals and environments but there is little research on these dynamics. We address this gap by conducting an inductive qualitative study of entrepreneurs in the exclusive tourist destination of Tiradentes, Brazil. Tiradentes has a unique architectural, cultural, and economic heritage that serves as a unique sociocultural backdrop that influences entrepreneurs’ models of start-up thinking and action. Specifically, our investigation revealed that entrepreneurs’ backgrounds (native vs. nonnative) and social identities come together with the sociocultural fabric of the community in a way that moved them towards a “Joia” or “Bijuteria” orientation, each of which were associated with a distinct mindset. This diversity had implications for entrepreneurs’ conceptualizations of start-up models possible within the backdrop of Tiradentes sociocultural fabric and this influenced the actions entrepreneurs took such as the geographic location chosen for the business and the business practices used. We discovered that entrepreneurs favoring one orientation over another tended to occupy predictable physical and social positions in the community while also espousing similar values and perspectives. These results are used to elaborate the theory on the link between the external and internal explanation for entrepreneurial thinking and action. The net effect is new understanding regarding ways models of start-up thinking and action can be investigated.

Details

Models of Start-up Thinking and Action: Theoretical, Empirical and Pedagogical Approaches
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-485-3

Keywords

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