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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2019

Laura Guerrero and Luciana Turchick Hakak

A dark side of global mobility is that many immigrants have negative work outcomes. Studies have analyzed the antecedents to poor work outcomes from the immigrants’ point…

Abstract

Purpose

A dark side of global mobility is that many immigrants have negative work outcomes. Studies have analyzed the antecedents to poor work outcomes from the immigrants’ point of view or from that of host country nationals. The purpose of this paper is to propose a relational model, which applies terror management theory to address how the economic mobility beliefs of immigrants and host country nationals interact and how these different combinations of beliefs affect the self-esteem of immigrants.

Design/methodology/approach

This theoretical model considers the impact of the social interactions between immigrants and host country nationals when immigrants’ mortality is salient.

Findings

In hostile environments that make immigrants’ mortality salient, lack of confirmation of immigrants’ beliefs about economic mobility from host country nationals can lead to a decrease in immigrants’ self-esteem and therefore to negative work outcomes.

Practical implications

As the number of immigrants grows, so do concerns about their ability to contribute to the economy. Lack of confirmation of their beliefs in a context in which their mortality is salient, is likely to lead to lower self-esteem and perhaps other negative outcomes.

Originality/value

This paper is the first, to the authors’ knowledge, to use terror management theory to advance our understanding of the outcome of a lack of confirmation from host country nationals of immigrants’ beliefs on economic mobility under conditions of mortality salience.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

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Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Tina L. Margolis, Julie Lauren Rones and Ariela Algaze

Films focusing on girls and women with anorexia have not found major producers and distributors in Hollywood, yet movies on subjects such as suicidality and bipolar…

Abstract

Films focusing on girls and women with anorexia have not found major producers and distributors in Hollywood, yet movies on subjects such as suicidality and bipolar disorder have been showcased. Eating disorders affect approximately 30 million people in the United States alone, and it has the highest mortality rate of any mental illness, so this invisibility seems incongruous. The authors theorize that Hollywood avoids this subject because of ontological anxiety. Movie plots are schemas and young females are inextricably associated with fertility and futurity. An anorexic’s appearance contradicts and nullifies this symbolic role because anorexia often leads to infertility and death. Psychological studies and philosophical arguments claim that a belief in an afterlife and the regeneration of humankind create coherence and meaning for individuals. An anorexic’s appearance and behavior represent images of self-destruction – images that inflame the viewer’s unconscious and primordial fears about the annihilation of the species. By avoiding the topic of anorexia, Hollywood defends against its symbolic fears of mortality but diminishes the importance of the subject through its absence; it ignores its place in women’s social history and erases its place in American history. Because of Hollywood’s social reach and because greater visibility is correlated with a reduction in stigma, the authors conjecture that a film on this subject would inspire necessary attention to women’s roles, public mores, public policies, and the social good.

Details

Gender and the Media: Women’s Places
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-329-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2019

Inam Ul Haq, Dirk De Clercq and Muhammad Umer Azeem

With a basis in conservation of resources theory, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of championing behaviour in the relationship between…

Abstract

Purpose

With a basis in conservation of resources theory, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of championing behaviour in the relationship between employees’ fear of terror and their job performance, as well as the buffering role of their passion for work, as a personal resource, in this process.

Design/methodology/approach

The tests of the hypotheses rely on three-wave, time-lagged data collected from employees and their supervisors in Pakistan.

Findings

An important reason that concerns about terrorist attacks diminish performance is that employees refrain from championing their own entrepreneurial ideas. This mediating role of idea championing is less salient, however, to the extent that employees feel a strong passion for their work.

Practical implications

For human resource managers, this study pinpoints a key mechanism – a reluctance to mobilize active support for entrepreneurial ideas – by which fears about terrorism attacks can spill over into the workplace and undermine employees’ ability to meet their performance requirements. It also reveals how this mechanism can be better contained by the presence of adequate personal resources.

Originality/value

This study adds to burgeoning research on the interplay between terrorism and organizational life by specifying how and when employees’ ruminations about terrorism threats might escalate into diminished performance outcomes at work.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2020

Shuaib Ahmed Soomro, Olivier Roques and Akhtiar Ali

This study aims to investigate the impact of fear of terror (FOT) on employee organizational commitment (OC) working in terror-induced areas through examining the role of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the impact of fear of terror (FOT) on employee organizational commitment (OC) working in terror-induced areas through examining the role of rumination as a mediator and perceived organization support (POS) as a moderator.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors develop a model in which the mediating role of rumination in the FOT relationship is conditional to the values of OC. Using a sample size of 268 respondents, questionnaires were used to collect data from Pakistan during a period when terrorist attacks were at a peak. Results from the hierarchical regression analyses provided support for the developed model.

Findings

Overall, the statistical model is significant (p < 0.05); the authors found negative relationships between FOT and OC. The authors found that FOT positively led to rumination, which then negatively led to OC. It was also found that POS significantly moderated FOT and OC.

Practical implications

This study revealed that FOT is a deterring factor that changed employees’ OC. It further revealed that organizations providing support to employees working in terrorist-ridden areas showed positive commitment. This paper discusses the theoretical and practical implications of these findings.

Originality/value

This paper provides an examination of the relationship between FOT and employee OC. It expands our knowledge of the stress theory and terror management theory for employees working in discontinuous areas.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2018

Viktoria Gallova, Marek Palasinski, Neil Shortland, Michael Humann and Lorraine Bowman Grieve

The purpose of this paper is to determine the potential predictors of anxiety about digital security, terrorist threats and support for high-tech counter measures.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the potential predictors of anxiety about digital security, terrorist threats and support for high-tech counter measures.

Design/methodology/approach

In Study 1, 195 participants indicated their anxiety about digital security systems, data protection and social networking sites. In Study 2, 107 participants indicated their anxiety about domestic terrorism, international terrorism and extremist groups. In Study 3, 261 participants indicated their support for high-tech counter-terrorism measures.

Findings

Study 1 suggests that whereas anxiety about digital security systems, data protection and social networking sites was positively predicted by right-wing authoritarianism, anxiety about social networking was also negatively predicted by time spent online. Study 2 shows that time spent online was a negative predictor of anxiety about domestic terrorism. Study 3 indicates that the strongest positive predictor of support for all the measures was right-wing authoritarianism, followed by national identity.

Research limitations/implications

The findings show the relevance of terror management theory to digital security and counter-terrorism.

Practical implications

It appears that right-wing authoritarianism and national identity may serve as mechanisms for people to subjectively counter the presented threats. This notion may inform relevant policy and practice aimed at making communities safer and potentially helps introduce counter-terror measures with less public backlash.

Social implications

When designing counter-terror measures, policy makers should consider compound national identities (e.g. Catalan or Basque people).

Originality/value

The paper makes contribution to under-explored areas of terrorism anxiety and support for counter-terror measures.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2017

Karin Klenke

Abstract

Details

Women in Leadership 2nd Edition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-064-8

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2021

Jing-Yi Chen

The argument that terror perception and individual time perspectives can affect behaviors has become increasingly relevant. This study analyzed the association of terror

Abstract

Purpose

The argument that terror perception and individual time perspectives can affect behaviors has become increasingly relevant. This study analyzed the association of terror perception with financial risk and developed an integrated framework of the interaction between terror perception (mortality salience) and time perspective to determine risky investment. People with different time perspectives have different acknowledgments of risk. Two studies of terror perception leading to more or less risky investment choices supported this framework to demonstrate that individuals exhibit more (less) risky investment behavior when terror perception is salient and they have a high (low) present hedonic time perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Two experiments were performed. Study 1 tested whether TP moderates the effects of terror priming (aging) on risky financial investment. Study 2 tested the effects of terror priming on risky financial investment decisions and the role of gender and the present hedonic TP (PH) in moderating these effects. The following hypotheses were then developed: H1: Participants with high PH primed with the aging condition will select riskier financial investments than those with low PH will (Study 1). H2: Male participants with higher PH primed in the death condition will select riskier financial investments than those in the control condition will (Study 2).

Findings

Because people with different TPs acknowledge risk differently, this article developed a new framework modeling MS on TP in risky investment selection. Two studies representative of MS affecting risky investment decision-making were conducted to test the framework. The results of the two studies indicated that individuals engaged in risky investment behavior more (less) when mortality was salient and the individual had high (low) PH. Moreover, gender influences these results. As anticipated, male participants with higher PH in the death-primed condition selected riskier financial investment than those in the control condition did. Additional research from a broader perspective is warranted.

Originality/value

Many psychological factors of risky decision-making have been discussed, such as motivational systems or situational motivation, self-framing, control orientation, sensation seeking, dishonesty, and ambiguity (Sekścińska et al., 2016). However, few studies have examined temporal framing, also known as time perspective (TP), the psychological concept of a person's relationship with time. This study mainly discusses the effects of terror perception on risky financial decisions by using a theoretical framework based on TP, which influences the effects of MS on risky financial decision-making. When mortality is made salient, individuals with present hedonic TP have behaviors characterized by risk perception. Those with present hedonic TP are more likely to make risky financial investments because they prefer present pleasure and risk over future outcomes (Zimbardo and Boyd, 2015).

Details

Review of Behavioral Finance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1940-5979

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Article
Publication date: 15 January 2021

Frank Goethals and Jennifer L. Ziegelmayer

The advent of extreme automation from new technologies such as artificial intelligence portends a massive increase in unemployment. The psychological impact of this threat…

Abstract

Purpose

The advent of extreme automation from new technologies such as artificial intelligence portends a massive increase in unemployment. The psychological impact of this threat on the workforce is critically important. This paper aims to examine the functioning of individuals' anxiety buffers in response to this threat.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-stage mixed-methods design is used. In stage 1, qualitative data are gathered through semi-structured interviews. In stage 2, quantitative data are collected through two experiments to assess the psychological impact of exposure to the threat.

Findings

Exposure to the threat of extreme automation reduces self-esteem, faith in the worldview and attachment security. When self-esteem and attachment security are under attack, they are ineffective as anxiety buffers, and anxiety levels increase. Additionally, there is a distal effect such that during a period of distraction, the threatened anxiety buffers are reinforced and return to their normal levels.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to a homogenous culture in which work is highly salient. Future research should include other cultures, other methods of exposure and further examine the distal effects.

Originality/value

The study examines the previously underexplored issue of individuals' psychological response to the impending changes in the workforce because of technological advancements.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 9 December 2019

Heba Mohamed Zahra

This paper aims to discuss the dilemma of terrorism as a political phenomenon that many political scientists care about; however, they find themselves incapable of…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the dilemma of terrorism as a political phenomenon that many political scientists care about; however, they find themselves incapable of explaining some of its aspects and they resort to other disciplines. The second part of the dilemma is related to the incapability of well-established disciplines to provide political scientists with much help. This raises the following question: Will political scientists be able to enhance their knowledge of terrorism with the help of scholars from consolidated and well-established disciplines or with the help of scholars from interdisciplinary fields?

Design/methodology/approach

This research depends on the main theories of psychology and of social psychology and adopts a comparative approach to assess the effectiveness of both disciplines in providing political scientists with the knowledge they lack.

Findings

In spite of being a well-established and consolidated discipline, psychology is not the perfect discipline that can help political scientists know who a terrorist is. Social psychological theories of aggression provide political scientists with greater ability to understand what psychological and sociological factors motivate a person to turn to aggression and terrorism. Moreover, social psychology developed the “terror management theory” which clarifies various aspects of the phenomenon.

Originality/value

This research paper calls the attention of scholars of terrorism to the importance of adopting an interdisciplinary approach to understand the various aspects of a complex phenomenon such as terrorism. The interdisciplinary field adopted will differ according to the research question that a researcher needs to answer.

Details

Review of Economics and Political Science, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2356-9980

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Article
Publication date: 21 December 2021

Patrícia de Oliveira Campos, Letícia Barbosa de Mélo, Jéssica Carvalho Veras de Souza, Poliana Nunes de Santana, Juliana Matte and Marconi Freitas da Costa

This study aims to contribute to the healthy eating literature by analyzing whether fear of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), ability to prepare food and the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to contribute to the healthy eating literature by analyzing whether fear of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), ability to prepare food and the safety-seeking are antecedents of the intention to consume healthy foods during COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted two studies. The first study was done with a sample of 546 valid respondents. Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM) was used to analyze data. The second study was qualitative, in which 40 subjects took part. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis.

Findings

The main findings reveal that ability to prepare food and the safety-seeking are strong antecedents of the intention to consume healthy foods. In addition, safety-seeking mediates the relationship between fear of COVID-19 and intention to consume healthy eating. However, high levels of fear did not influence the ability to prepare food and intention to consume healthy foods. Also, the ability to prepare food does not mediate the relation between fear of COVID-19 and intention to consume healthy food.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to consider terror management propositions to analyze the intention to consume healthy foods during COVID-19 pandemic. From a scientific point of view, it has several contributions to the literature. First, this study provides advances and innovation in the field by identifying new explanatory relations. Second, this study extends the scope of terror management health model (TMHM) by analyzing it in the pandemic context. Third, the findings seem to provide empirical support for recent criticism of TMHM assumptions. Moreover, practical implications are outlined to public health decision-makers and healthy food businesses on increasing consumers’ intention to healthy eating.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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