Search results

1 – 10 of 182
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 June 2008

Terence Brown and Thomas E. Buttross

This research aims to measure the financial and operating impact for US retailers that adopted quick response (QR). It specifically looks at the impact of QR on…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to measure the financial and operating impact for US retailers that adopted quick response (QR). It specifically looks at the impact of QR on profitability, cost efficiency, and inventory management.

Design/methodology/approach

The research analyzed data from the CRSP/Compustat data base of US publicly held corporations to compare adopters of QR with non‐adopters before and after adoption.

Findings

The results indicated that adopters of QR did not benefit as expected. Adopters, on average, did not improve their performance to a statistically significant degree with respect to profitability, cost efficiency, or inventory levels.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitations of the research include the fairly small number of firms studied (11 adopters and 16 non‐adopters) and the lack of evidence identifying the reasons for the adopters poor performance. Another limitation is the fact that only the manufacturers perceptions have been considered. It would be beneficial in future research to consider the opinion of retailers about their own management of these brands.

Originality/value

The research uses objective actual financial results before and after adoption of QR and avoids the practice of using subjective management opinions of success. The research design includes before and after analysis with a control group – the strongest design possible given the inability to randomly assign firms to the adopter and non‐adopter categories.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 36 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 August 2017

Terence A. Brown, Douglas C. Friedman and Zinaida Taran

The purpose of this chapter is to examine the phenomenon of “showrooming” in which shoppers use mobile devices in retail stores to check prices and other data on products…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this chapter is to examine the phenomenon of “showrooming” in which shoppers use mobile devices in retail stores to check prices and other data on products that they then may buy online.

Methodology/approach

We conducted depth interviews with 50 consumers, 13 small retailers, and 6 large retailers.

Findings

We identified four distinct behavioral groups of customers and six strategies small retailers are currently using or could use to address the potential problems showrooming can create. We also identified a new type of reference pricing.

Research limitations/implications

This research provides a guide researchers can use in further work on showrooming. The research consists of depth interviews. It is possible that other types of retailers may have developed other strategies not identified here or that a larger number of non-student participants would have identified other categories, though differences between students and non-students in our sample were not noteworthy.

Practical implications

This chapter provides a practical guide to small retailers as to how they can deal with the growing practice of showrooming, helping them to choose strategic responses based on the types of consumers they serve.

Originality/value

This is one of the first papers to be published in an academic journal on the value of showrooming. It provides a typology of consumers grouped by their behavior, that is, how and why they engage or don’t engage in showrooming. This can help academic researchers in future research as well as managers of small retail businesses. We also identified a new, third type of reference pricing.

Details

Qualitative Consumer Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-491-0

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Stuart James

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 16 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 August 2017

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Consumer Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-491-0

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 3 July 2018

Abstract

Details

Innovation and Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-828-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1987

Edward A. Morash

One of the less observed results of transportation deregulation has been the explosive growth of transportation intermediaries or third‐party specialists such as brokers…

Abstract

One of the less observed results of transportation deregulation has been the explosive growth of transportation intermediaries or third‐party specialists such as brokers, shippers' agents and integrated leasing companies for use by industrial purchasers and marketing management. Such transportation intermediaries have the performance potential and apparent reasons for existence to suggest that they can both reduce delivered product costs and enhance service quality attributes to promote a company's competitive advantage. In a broader sense, intermediaries may be ideally positioned to assist in coordinating and processing information for the entire value‐added chain.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 19 September 2019

Abstract

Details

Marketing in a Digital World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-339-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 16 September 1997

Terence K. Huwe

Abstract

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12024-621-2

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12024-617-5

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Rodney Wilson

Economists usually try to avoid making moral judgements, at least in their professional capacity. Positive economics is seen as a way of analysing economic problems, in as…

Abstract

Economists usually try to avoid making moral judgements, at least in their professional capacity. Positive economics is seen as a way of analysing economic problems, in as scientific a manner as is possible in human sciences. Economists are often reluctant to be prescriptive, most seeing their task as presenting information on the various options, but leaving the final choice, to the political decision taker. The view of many economists is that politicians can be held responsible for the morality of their actions when making decisions on economic matters, unlike unelected economic advisors, and therefore the latter should limit their role.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

1 – 10 of 182