Search results

1 – 10 of over 4000
Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2016

Elizabeth Dreike Almer, Amelia A. Baldwin, Allison Jones-Farmer, Margaret Lightbody and Louise E. Single

To understand the reasons that accounting academics leave the tenure-track academic pipeline.

Abstract

Purpose

To understand the reasons that accounting academics leave the tenure-track academic pipeline.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey study was conducted of PhD graduates who left the tenure-track accounting pipeline over a 22-year period.

Findings

We located and surveyed accounting PhD graduates who have opted out of the tenure-track. These opt-outs included those who have left academia entirely and those who have moved into non-tenure-track positions. Survey results indicate that dissatisfaction with research expectations is the most significant factor for faculty now employed in non-tenure-track positions. Although there were no gender-related differences in the number of faculty who left the tenure-track but stayed in academia, there were some gender differences in the importance of family-related factors in motivating the move off of the tenure-track.

Research limitations/implications

The study examines the importance of the “push” and “pull” factors associated with changing career paths in academia that have been identified in the literature. The study finds some differences in influential factors between accounting academia and other fields. Sample size is a potential limitation.

Practical implications

The study provides recommendations for PhD program directors and for hiring institutions to help reduce the number of opt-outs.

Social implications

Retention of qualified faculty who are dedicated teachers improves students’ educational outcomes.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine factors that drive accounting academics to opt-out of the tenure-track.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-969-5

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2016

Todd A. Finkle

This article examines whether the field of entrepreneurship is becoming increasingly institutionalized by examining market trends, AACSB jobs, and salaries. The findings…

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Abstract

This article examines whether the field of entrepreneurship is becoming increasingly institutionalized by examining market trends, AACSB jobs, and salaries. The findings indicate that the field is becoming increasingly institutionalized through market trends. During 2014/15, there were 471 advertised positions and 163 candidates in Schools of Business and Management. The number of tenure track positions (261) was significantly higher than the number of tenure track candidates (161) for a ratio of 1.62. This is the highest ratio of tenure track positions to candidates since 2005/06 (2.1). Out of the 261 tenure track positions, 174 were at AACSB institutions.The ratio of tenure track positions at AACSB schools per tenure track candidate was 1.08. The study also looked at average salaries at AACSB schools and found them to be competitive with other mainstream areas. Average salaries were: full professors ($162,000), associate professor ($131,400), assistant professor ($113,600), instructor ($85,800), and new doctorates ($97,800).

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 29 March 2021

Liang Zhang, Ronald Ehrenberg and Xiangmin Liu

We use panel data models to examine variations and changes in faculty employment at four-year colleges and universities in the United States. The share of part-time…

Abstract

We use panel data models to examine variations and changes in faculty employment at four-year colleges and universities in the United States. The share of part-time faculty among total faculty has continued to grow during the last two decades, while the share of full-time lecturers and instructors has been relatively stable. Meanwhile, the share of nontenure track faculty among full-time faculty has been growing, especially among the professorial ranks. Dynamic panel data models suggest that employment levels of different types of faculty respond to a variety of economic and institutional factors. Colleges and universities have increasingly employed faculty whose salaries and benefits are relatively inexpensive; the slowly deteriorating financial situations at most colleges and universities have led to an increasing reliance on a contingent academic workforce. A cross-sectional comparison of the share of full-time nontenure track faculty also reveals significant variations across institutions.

Book part
Publication date: 28 January 2019

Jussi Kivistö, Elias Pekkola and Attila Pausits

Historically, academic careers in many European universities have been characterized by the civil servant status of academics (i.e., an open vacancy model) based on the…

Abstract

Historically, academic careers in many European universities have been characterized by the civil servant status of academics (i.e., an open vacancy model) based on the German Lehrstuhl (professorial chair) tradition. The chair system has been abandoned in many countries, and the status of civil servants has been changed to private employment. At the same time, many European universities have introduced some variant of the tenure track model to increase the attractiveness of academic careers at their institutions; however, open vacancy models continue to dominate academic careers in Europe. This chapter describes recent changes in academic promotion systems using case examples from tenure track models in two European countries, Finland and Austria. In conclusion, this chapter offers examples based on the best practices and challenges identified in the analyzed tenure track models.

Details

Achieving Academic Promotion
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-902-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 April 2012

Randall Bowden and Lynn P. Gonzalez

The faculty, as higher education's most valuable asset, is being dramatically altered. Changes in appointment status drive this alteration, resulting in the essential work…

Abstract

Purpose

The faculty, as higher education's most valuable asset, is being dramatically altered. Changes in appointment status drive this alteration, resulting in the essential work of faculty being transformed. Given this change in faculty composition, this study seeks to examine how faculty appointments relate to the production of faculty work in teaching, research, and service. Faculty appointments affect faculty work and it implies that the function of higher education also is altered. The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the rise of contingent faculty on the professoriate and higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

The National Study of Postsecondary Faculty of 2004 provided data for analyses. There were faculty and instructional staff participants (26,110) from a sample of 980 institutions in the USA and the District of Columbia. The National Center for Education Statistics provides access to its Data Analysis System (DAS) for public use. Basic calculations can result in straight counts, percentages, means, correlation coefficients, and tables. Complex analytic capabilities include covariance using both weighted least squares regression and logistic regression. The DAS was used to examine how changes in faculty composition were related to teaching, research, and service.

Findings

Overall, the results indicate that tenured and tenuretrack faculty out‐perform contingent faculty on all major items of teaching, research, and service. With few exceptions, contingent faculty can be viewed as less productive faculty members within the historical function of higher education to promote inquiry and advance the sum of human knowledge, provide general instruction to the students, and develop experts for various branches of the public. If faculty are the heart and health of colleges and universities, the future of higher education may be bleak if the reliance on contingent faculty continues to soar.

Practical implications

The gap between performance levels of tenure/tenuretrack and contingent faculty in teaching, research, and service indicates the quality of higher education is rapidly eroding. This study indicated that the contributions to promoting inquiry and advancing the sum of human knowledge are diminished with increasing use of contingent faculty. It suggests that not only is the work of faculty threatened by a contingent faculty approach but the well‐being of higher education is threatened also.

Social implications

Overall, tenured and tenuretrack faculty out‐performed other types of faculty appointments according to essential values of faculty – teaching research, and service. Faculty appointments play a significant role in the overall performance of higher education. The function of higher education cannot help but be affected. Society relies on higher education for not only career training but an educated citizenry. If left to contract and part‐time help, it raises concern for the overall well being of society.

Originality/value

Although there is literature discussing concerns about the influx of contingent faculty, there is little, if any, empirical evidence of its impact on the professoriate and its relationship to the overall health and well being of higher education. This study suggests that the traditional framework of faculty work – teaching, research, and service – is being dramatically altered.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 3 June 2008

Deborah Lee

The institution of tenure has elicited debate and controversy since its introduction in higher education. Proponents argue the need for tenure based on academic freedom…

Abstract

The institution of tenure has elicited debate and controversy since its introduction in higher education. Proponents argue the need for tenure based on academic freedom and efficient university governance. Critics argue that it represents inefficiency in the higher education labor market and protects less productive faculty members. The use of tenure in academic libraries has been no less controversial, with only 40−60% of academic libraries supporting tenure track positions for academic librarians. This dichotomy in the labor market for academic librarians represents a natural experiment and allows for the testing of the presence of a compensating wage differential for tenure.

This study examines 10 years’ worth of cross-sectional data drawn from member libraries of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). Models examine both the institutional characteristics of tenure-granting ARL academic libraries and the impact of tenure on starting salaries. Issues related to both a union wage premium and a compensating wage differential due to tenure are explored. The results of this research suggest that tenure, while serving other functions within an academic library setting, does not have the predicted impact on starting salaries.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1488-1

Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Marcus T. Allen and Carol A. Sweeney

The increasing use of non-tenure employment contracting as a cost savings and/or management flexibility increasing mechanism in colleges and universities raises concerns…

Abstract

Purpose

The increasing use of non-tenure employment contracting as a cost savings and/or management flexibility increasing mechanism in colleges and universities raises concerns about the impact of this strategy on other aspects of the higher education system. The purpose of this paper is to document reduced research productivity at a university that uses rolling contracts in comparison to research productivity at another university in the same state university system in the USA that uses tenure track contracting.

Design/methodology/approach

Negative binomial regression analysis allows investigation of the primary variable of interest (appointment type) while controlling for other factors that may also affect research productivity.

Findings

The findings suggest that non-tenure track employment contracting may have other long-term implications for institutions of higher education that warrant consideration.

Originality/value

No prior study has investigated the topic of comparative research productivity in business schools using this methodology or data source.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 43 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 12 August 2021

Yanbing Wang and Joyce B. Main

While postdoctoral research (postdoc) training is a common step toward academic careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields, the role of…

Abstract

Purpose

While postdoctoral research (postdoc) training is a common step toward academic careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields, the role of postdoc training in social sciences is less clear. An increasing number of social science PhDs are pursuing postdocs. This paper aims to identify factors associated with participation in postdoc training and examines the relationship between postdoc training and subsequent career outcomes, including attainment of tenure-track faculty positions and early career salaries.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data from the National Science Foundation Survey of Earned Doctorates and Survey of Doctorate Recipients, this study applies propensity score matching, regression and decomposition analyses to identify the role of postdoc training on the employment outcomes of PhDs in the social science and STEM fields.

Findings

Results from the regression analyses indicate that participation in postdoc training is associated with greater PhD research experience, higher departmental research ranking and departmental job placement norms. When the postdocs and non-postdocs groups are balanced on observable characteristics, postdoc training is associated with a higher likelihood of attaining tenure-track faculty positions 7 to 9 years after PhD completion. The salaries of social science tenure-track faculty with postdoc experience eventually surpass the salaries of non-postdoc PhDs, primarily via placement at institutions that offer relatively higher salaries. This pattern, however, does not apply to STEM PhDs.

Originality/value

This study leverages comprehensive, nationally representative data to investigate the role of postdoc training in the career outcomes of social sciences PhDs, in comparison to STEM PhDs. Research findings suggest that for social sciences PhDs interested in academic careers, postdoc training can contribute to the attainment of tenure-track faculty positions and toward earning relatively higher salaries over time. Research findings provide prospective and current PhDs with information helpful in career planning and decision-making. Academic institutions, administrators, faculty and stakeholders can apply these research findings toward developing programs and interventions to provide doctoral students with career guidance and greater career transparency.

Details

Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4686

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Beronda L. Montgomery

To provide an introspective review of one author's account of his first year in a tenuretrack academic career and general recommendations that can be drawn therefrom.

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Abstract

Purpose

To provide an introspective review of one author's account of his first year in a tenuretrack academic career and general recommendations that can be drawn therefrom.

Design/methodology/approach

A critique of the book Life on the Tenure Track: Lessons from the First Year is presented to assist individuals pursuing or newly engaged in a tenuretrack academic position or to aid those serving as mentors of pre‐tenure faculty members. Areas addressed are balancing professional and personal life domains, teaching, research, service, publishing and tenure.

Findings

A central theme emerges suggesting that more information and formal and informal guidance are needed to assist new faculty members during the transition into academic positions. A number of practical suggestions and resources are provided.

Practical implications

A practical resource for new faculty members and graduate students planning to pursue a position in academia. Also a valuable source for administrators or senior faculty members supervising junior colleagues who have recently obtained a tenuretrack position.

Originality/value

This review identifies and expounds upon salient suggestions provided by author James Lang for surviving the first year of a tenuretrack position.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 June 2010

Scott Eacott

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether the demographic variables of tenure and functional track have a moderating effect on the strategic leadership of school leaders.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether the demographic variables of tenure and functional track have a moderating effect on the strategic leadership of school leaders.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a conceptual framework developed by the researcher, a static/cross‐sectional questionnaire‐based study on a convenience sample of public primary school principals in NSW, Australia, was used to collect data. Analysis included ANOVA and correlations.

Findings

Despite few statistically significant differences in the data set, there is evidence to suggest that, based on the small sample size, the demographic variables of tenure and functional track have a moderating effect on the strategic leadership and management of public primary school principals.

Research limitations/implications

The study serves as little more than a scoping project. The small sample size limits the generalisability of the findings; however, the results do indicate that there is something to be made of the general thesis of the paper.

Practical implications

As education systems across the globe are faced with a crisis in filling school leadership positions with the mass retirement of the baby boomers, the potential implications of tenure and functional track on school leadership is of vital importance to all involved in schools.

Originality/value

The paper makes use of tenure and functional track in relation to strategic leadership, a combination rarely seen in the field. The very concept of functional track is original to the field and has the potential to uncover much needed insight into school leadership.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 4000