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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Carole B. Sox, Jeffrey M. Campbell, Sheryl F. Kline, Sandra K. Strick and Tena B. Crews

This paper aims to examine generational formative referents as factors that influence meeting attendees’ adoption and technology use within virtual and hybrid meetings, and test…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine generational formative referents as factors that influence meeting attendees’ adoption and technology use within virtual and hybrid meetings, and test the applicability of the technology acceptance model (TAM) as presented by Davis (1986). This study investigates how attendees’ experiences from their respective formative years (i.e. generational formative referents), the basis of the Generational Cohort Theory (GCT), influence the TAM model constructs.

Design/methodology/approach

A partial least squares analysis test is utilized to determine technology acceptance within meetings across three generations: Baby Boomers (1946-1964), Generation X (1965-1978) and Generation Y (1979-2000).

Findings

The multi-group comparison determined all three generations responded similarly with regard to the paths being tested, indicating each of the three generational cohorts within this study are influenced by the experiences of their formative years, which are different for each generation.

Research limitations/implications

The findings add to the limited foundation for scholars wanting to further analyze technology use within meetings, and for those interested in generational influences.

Practical implications

This study provides useful information for marketers and planners to increase meeting attendance, enhance attendee satisfaction, and further explore meeting engagement opportunities.

Originality/value

Underpinning the GCT, this study is the first within hospitality and tourism studies to investigate a theoretical model on generational technology use within meetings.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 December 2004

Michael S. Alvard and Allen Gillespie

Data are presented on the benefits and costs that accrue to big game hunters living in the whaling community of Lamalera, Indonesia. Results indicate that big game hunting…

Abstract

Data are presented on the benefits and costs that accrue to big game hunters living in the whaling community of Lamalera, Indonesia. Results indicate that big game hunting provides males a strong selective advantage. Harpooners, and to a lesser degree hunters in general, reap substantial fitness benefits from their activities. Hunters, especially harpooners, have significantly more offspring than other men after controlling for age. Hazard analysis shows that harpooners marry significantly earlier and start reproducing at an earlier age. This is not case for other hunt group members or non-hunting participants – the technicians and the boat managers. These results are consistent with data from other hunting societies that show significant reproductive benefits for good hunters. Harpooners experience other costs and benefits. Harpooners receive significantly more meat even after controlling for the effort they expend hunting, while at the same time suffer an increased risk of mortality. The results are discussed in the context of the hunting hypothesis and the current debate within human behavioral ecology concerning the role of hunting as a human male reproductive strategy.

Details

Socioeconomic Aspects of Human Behavioral Ecology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-255-9

Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

M. Asjad, M.S. Kulkarni and O.P. Gandhi

Original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) start providing support to their products, that helped them in beating the competition across the worldwide. The unavailability of spares…

Abstract

Purpose

Original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) start providing support to their products, that helped them in beating the competition across the worldwide. The unavailability of spares and crews may also prolong the downtime of equipment, thereby affecting the systems’ performance. The spares and crews have as much effect on the systems’ performance as the design characteristics (i.e. reliability and maintainability). Thus, the OEMs required to extent the support to their products through maintenance, spares, crews, etc., so as to gain the customer satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

The mathematical model for spares, crews and support quality has been presented in this research work. The problem has been identified from the literature perspective for mechanical systems.

Findings

The model has been implemented on a real-life problem, in which the OEMs provide support to their make installed at compressed natural gas workstation in National Capital Region, India.

Originality/value

The research proposed in this work will be helpful to manufacturer, customer, academician, researcher, industrialist and any concerned person, to get the exhaustive benefits from the system.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 October 2018

Ian Greatbatch, Robert J. Koester and Andrea L. Kleinsmith

It is a well held belief that the full moon period and the date Friday 13th has an impact on the number of emergency call outs for emergency services. The purpose of this paper is…

Abstract

Purpose

It is a well held belief that the full moon period and the date Friday 13th has an impact on the number of emergency call outs for emergency services. The purpose of this paper is to critically explore that belief. It also examines the versatility and richness of response records, and demonstrates the effectiveness of combining data sets.

Design/methodology/approach

The work takes four varied data sets, from four rescue agencies along with the International Search and Rescue Database and compared the average number of calls on a full moon night, non-full moon and full moon period (the full moon night, the day before and day after). The average number of incidents on Friday 13th was also investigated. It uses a statistical approach to test the difference between “normal” dates and those dates traditionally believed to be busier.

Findings

Although there were differences between Friday 13th, full moon nights, full moon periods and “normal” days, the differences were in general extremely small, not significantly significant and in most cases actually dropped during the supposedly unlucky period. The exception to this is a very small increase in the average number of responses during full moons for most data sets, although this was not statistically significant. This paper concludes that there is no evidence in the data for any impact of the full moon upon rescue teams’ activities.

Research limitations/implications

This research deals with a small set of responses, from the UK only, and addresses an issue that is clearly not the most pressing. However, it does demonstrate evidenced-based management in practice, in that resources have incorrectly been assigned in the past to these dates.

Practical implications

This work shows that preconceptions exist within the emergency services and that, without evidence-led management, resources can be allocated on hearsay. This shows that widely available software and techniques can be applied to organisational data and used to make management decisions more appropriate.

Social implications

Rescue organisations are almost exclusively charity or public sector organisations, meaning that their budgets are sourced from donations or the tax-payer. Putting to bed misconceptions over resources for certain dates will ultimately benefit society in those terms.

Originality/value

There has been very little work on this phenomenon, although some works on A&E department admissions have taken place. This is the only work to date to combine data in this way for this purpose.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 February 2021

Ayman Bahjat Abdallah, Rasha Zuhair Alkhaldi and Majed M. Aljuaid

The purpose of the current study is to address a debatable issue in the extant literature regarding lean management (LM), innovation and operational performance (OP) relationships…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the current study is to address a debatable issue in the extant literature regarding lean management (LM), innovation and operational performance (OP) relationships in the manufacturing SMEs. It conceptualizes LM in terms of social and technical aspects and investigates their effects on process innovation, management innovation and OP. The mediating roles of process and management innovations on social/technical-OP relationships are also explored.

Design/methodology/approach

The study analyzes survey data gathered from 268 manufacturing SMEs belonging to different industry types in Jordan. Validity and reliability tests of the first and second order constructs were performed. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test the study hypotheses.

Findings

Both social and technical LM were found to positively affect OP. Social LM positively affected both process and management innovations. However, the effect of technical LM on both types of innovation was not significant. In addition, process and management innovations positively mediated social LM-OP relationship. Nonetheless, neither type of innovation showed mediating effects on technical LM-OP relationship.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to highlight the proposed relationships, in general, and in the context of SMEs in a developing country context, in particular. It offers important implications for the managers of SMEs to benefit from LM implementation and avoid its failure, enhance innovation efforts by focusing on social LM practices and subsequently achieve higher levels of OP.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 October 2022

Sari Mansour

Through the lens of conservation of resource theory and the model of ability, motivation and opportunity (AMO), this study tests the relationship between high performance work…

Abstract

Purpose

Through the lens of conservation of resource theory and the model of ability, motivation and opportunity (AMO), this study tests the relationship between high performance work practices (HPWP), emotional exhaustion and service recovery performance (SRP). It examines the direct effect of AMO bundles on emotional exhaustion and the indirect effect of these bundles on SRP via emotional exhaustion.

Design/methodology/approach

In a sample of 1,664 flight attendants from Canada, Germany and France, this study uses a quantitative method. Using AMOS V.24, CFA was used to test quality of scales, model fit as well as the direct effects. The method of Monte Carlo (parametric bootstrap) and more precisely bias corrected percentile method were used to test the mediation mechanism, based on 5,000 bootstrapping and 95% confidence intervals.

Findings

Results show that all AMO bundles can be considered as a resource caravan passageway protecting employees against resources loss and allowing them to perform well and to recover service after a failure. They reveal that each bundle has a direct, negative link with emotional exhaustion, a health-related well-being and an indirect effect on SRP via emotional exhaustion.

Research limitations/implications

The finding further highlights the need to distinguish between AMO dimensions in strategic HRM research and practice. The cross-sectional nature of this study limits the establishment of causal links between variables. The author encourages future researchers to adopt a research design enabling to collect data at two or three-time periods and involving multi-source data.

Practical implications

Companies should be aware of the mechanisms through which HPWP influence the occupational health and performance of flight attendants and consider that “different bundles can have different effects” as important when they would redesign their HRM practices. In turn, it is rather opportunity enhancing HPWP (e.g. empowerment, work teams) that will be the most efficient in improving SRP. In a customer service context, and for flight attendants who work for prolonged hours with sometimes demanding passengers, it seems very important that airlines empower their flight attendants to use their skills and abilities to respond to problems arising onboard, either from service failures or any complaint a passenger may have. Employers should aim to create pools of practices designed to enrich and protect the resources of their employees allowing them to reduce emotional exhaustion.

Originality/value

This research study contributes therefore to the HRM-well-being-individual and/or organizational performance debate in a very particular context, by using the AMO framework to test the proposed relationship. In doing so, this study advances the theoretical and empirical evidence on how HR systems and AMO framework can be applied in this setting. The findings allow distinguishing which bundle of HRM is the most influential on emotional exhaustion, which can advance the literature in strategic human resource management. The paper adds to the literature by addressing the role of emotional exhaustion rather than happiness-related measures of well-being. Thus, our results stress the importance of health-related well-being, and emotional exhaustion, as an important pathway through which AMO-bundles influence performance outcomes and confirm that there are different well-being pathways to consider in the HRM-performance relationship. By using different bundles of AMO, the study advances the literature by showing that each bundle could have a different effect as the findings show that only opportunity enhancing HPWPs still directly impacted SRP after introducing the mediator (emotional exhaustion).

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Marie-Louise Fry, Josephine Previte and Linda Brennan

This paper aims to propose a new ecological systems-driven framework, underpinned by a relational marketplace lens, for social marketing practitioners to consider when planning…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a new ecological systems-driven framework, underpinned by a relational marketplace lens, for social marketing practitioners to consider when planning and designing programs. The authors contend that behavioural change does not occur in a vacuum and, as such, point to an ecology in which the individual is but one participant in a broader scope of social change activities.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is conceptual and presents the Indicators for Social Change Framework.

Findings

The Indicators for Social Change Framework puts forward a series of “must-have” indicators to consider when designing and planning social marketing programmes. Across identified indicators, the Framework delineates types of marketing actions to consider when planning for individual-oriented change and those required for wider systems-oriented change.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the broadening and deepening of the social marketing argument that reliance on individual behaviour change perspectives is not sufficient to resolve complex social problems that are inherently influenced by wider social forces. In transforming social change design, this paper transitions towards a logic view of social marketing that encourages and supports social change planners to be inclusive of interactions, processes and outcomes of value creation across the wider social marketing system.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

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