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Book part
Publication date: 1 August 2012

Catherine L. Wang and Mark N.K. Saunders

Purpose – To reflect on reasons for refusal in cross-cultural telephone surveys and address ways of reducing non-response from Chinese managers.Approach – We first propose…

Abstract

Purpose – To reflect on reasons for refusal in cross-cultural telephone surveys and address ways of reducing non-response from Chinese managers.

Approach – We first propose a conceptual model for telephone survey cooperation, drawing on existing research regarding survey non-response. This is evaluated through reflections on non-response to a telephone survey of 1,900 Chinese senior and middle managers working in privately owned high-technology firms.

Findings – We conclude with a framework for cooperation in cross-cultural telephone surveys, enhancing the leverage-saliency theory. Among many factors, home country interviewers are crucial in gaining access and generating survey interview responses. However, they require careful recruitment, rigorous training and monitoring to help ensure the quality of research data.

Research implications – Our framework provides practical advice in minimising non-response in cross-cultural telephone surveys. This includes sample selection, the development of the survey instrument (and translation), reasons for refusal, research incentives and the role of interviewers.

Originality/value – Our contribution in this chapter is twofold: an enhanced understanding of leverage-saliency theory in cross-cultural telephone surveys, and an articulation of the role of interviewers in changing the dynamics of positive and negative leverage through telephone interaction with managers.

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West Meets East: Toward Methodological Exchange
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-026-0

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Jing Shi, Ergin Erdem, Yidong Peng, Peter Woodbridge and Christopher Masek

Telephone response system is the frontline of hospital operations. The purpose of this paper is to analyze a representative telephone response system of Veterans Affairs…

Abstract

Purpose

Telephone response system is the frontline of hospital operations. The purpose of this paper is to analyze a representative telephone response system of Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals, address the existing inefficiency issues such as long call waiting time, and improve system resilience to changes.

Design/methodology/approach

Resource sharing schemes are proposed to improve the system performance in answering calls related to appointment booking and medication renewal. Discrete event simulation is adopted to model the current system and the resource sharing schemes.

Findings

The resource sharing schemes dramatically improve system performance reflected by the decrease of call waiting time and queue, as well as the extreme high utilization of agents in a key unit. Compared with the less desired alternative of hiring additional employees to mitigate the performance issues, the resource sharing schemes perform at par or even better. Sharing more resource during the peak hours can further balance the agent workload.

Practical implications

The resource sharing schemes could alleviate staffing shortage, long waiting time, and high-abandonment rate in the bottle-beck unit of the system, and lead to better utilization of scarce resources on the hospital floor. The concept reflects localized centralization efforts in traditionally highly decentralized telephone operations in hospital systems.

Originality/value

This research provides a structured approach to analyze the operations of a VA telephone response system. The developed simulation model is validated, and this provides a valuable tool for management to analyze the complicated telephone operations of the telephone systems of other VA and non-VA hospitals. Resource sharing constitutes a cost-effective solution for improving system performance and resilience.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 35 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Rich Ling

This article examines the use of mobile telephones by teenagers in Norway. The data for this study are based on two sources; first they draw on qualitative interviews with…

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Abstract

This article examines the use of mobile telephones by teenagers in Norway. The data for this study are based on two sources; first they draw on qualitative interviews with a sample of 12 families with teenagers in the greater Oslo area. In addition, they use a quantitative study of a national sample of 1,000 randomly selected teenagers. The data show that it is boys, most often those who work, that own mobile telephones. The qualitative analysis shows that the motives for owning mobile telephones are accessibility, safety and micro‐coordination. In addition, the mobile telephone serves as a symbol of emancipation. Metaphors surrounding the telephone allow for discussions of status construction and identification.

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Information Technology & People, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

George K. Chako

Briefly reviews previous literature by the author before presenting an original 12 step system integration protocol designed to ensure the success of companies or…

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5204

Abstract

Briefly reviews previous literature by the author before presenting an original 12 step system integration protocol designed to ensure the success of companies or countries in their efforts to develop and market new products. Looks at the issues from different strategic levels such as corporate, international, military and economic. Presents 31 case studies, including the success of Japan in microchips to the failure of Xerox to sell its invention of the Alto personal computer 3 years before Apple: from the success in DNA and Superconductor research to the success of Sunbeam in inventing and marketing food processors: and from the daring invention and production of atomic energy for survival to the successes of sewing machine inventor Howe in co‐operating on patents to compete in markets. Includes 306 questions and answers in order to qualify concepts introduced.

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Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 12 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2011

Moira Cachia and Lynne Millward

The telephone has been widely used to conduct quantitative research in diverse fields of study, generally using survey methodology. However, comparatively very few…

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9948

Abstract

Purpose

The telephone has been widely used to conduct quantitative research in diverse fields of study, generally using survey methodology. However, comparatively very few qualitative studies opt for this means of data collection. The purpose of this paper is to argue in favour of a medium that has generally been second‐rated in qualitative research. It aims at establishing telephone interviews as an equally viable option to other established methods of qualitative data collection.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is informed by the authors’ experience of using this method, as well as the limited number of previous research articles presented on the topic. It discusses its specific strengths and limitations, drawing on a conducted longitudinal study to illustrate key points. Its application to particular qualitative analysis methods, in view of the acknowledged requirements for each of these approaches, is also presented.

Findings

Telephone conversations naturally follow an agenda‐driven format that is initiated by the caller, similar to semi‐structured interviews. The authors propose that the telephone medium and interview modality are complementary. Also, the interview transcripts provide rich textual data that can subsequently be analysed using a range of qualitative data analysis methods.

Originality/value

Focus is placed on the methodological strengths of using telephone interviews in qualitative research, rather than convenience factors which have been the most featured element in previous literature. The paper aims at informing researchers who want to consider using the telephone medium for qualitative data collection and analysis.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2010

Pat Fitzsimons

In this article the Chief Executive of the UK's only teleconferencing charity, Community Network, examines the problem of loneliness and social isolation that growing…

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117

Abstract

In this article the Chief Executive of the UK's only teleconferencing charity, Community Network, examines the problem of loneliness and social isolation that growing numbers of older people are now experiencing, and how telephone support and befriending groups can help to alleviate these feelings. As well as highlighting the scale and causes of the problem, the article takes a look at different types of telephone befriending groups and why the telephone is currently a far better solution for delivering this type of support than web‐based alternatives. The article also explains how telephone befriending groups work; how much they cost; evaluating the success of the groups; and, most importantly, what the groups can achieve.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

Brian Quinn

Although the telephone constitutes an important aspect of reference service in many libraries, it is frequently taken for granted or overlooked by both patrons and…

Abstract

Although the telephone constitutes an important aspect of reference service in many libraries, it is frequently taken for granted or overlooked by both patrons and professional staff alike. Often, it is seen by librarians as merely an adjunct service, or even something of a nuisance. In this view, telephone reference is considered secondary and subordinate to serving on‐site patrons.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2016

Rhiannon Lord, Nicola Bolton, Scott Fleming and Melissa Anderson

The purpose of this paper was to review the effectiveness of telephone interviewing for capturing data and to consider in particular the challenges faced by telephone

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to review the effectiveness of telephone interviewing for capturing data and to consider in particular the challenges faced by telephone interviewers when capturing information about market segments.

Design/methodology/approach

The platform for this methodological critique was a market segment analysis commissioned by Sport Wales which involved a series of 85 telephone interviews completed during 2010. Two focus groups involving the six interviewers involved in the study were convened to reflect on the researchers’ experiences and the implications for business and management research.

Findings

There are three principal sets of findings. First, although telephone interviewing is generally a cost-effective data collection method, it is important to consider both the actual costs (i.e. time spent planning and conducting interviews) as well as the opportunity costs (i.e. missed appointments, “chasing participants”). Second, researchers need to be sensitised to and sensitive to the demographic characteristics of telephone interviewees (insofar as these are knowable) because responses are influenced by them. Third, the anonymity of telephone interviews may be more conducive for discussing sensitive issues than face-to-face interactions.

Originality/value

The present study adds to this modest body of literature on the implementation of telephone interviewing as a research technique of business and management. It provides valuable methodological background detail about the intricate, personal experiences of researchers undertaking this method “at a distance” and without visual cues, and makes explicit the challenges of telephone interviewing for the purposes of data capture.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 39 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 26 March 2018

Francisco Gonzalez, Blanca Cimadevila, Julio Garcia-Comesaña, Susana Cerqueiro, Eladio Andion, Jorge Prado, Jorge Bermudez and Felix Rubial

The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze a teleconsultation modality based on a simple telephone call, using either landline or mobile phone, made available to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze a teleconsultation modality based on a simple telephone call, using either landline or mobile phone, made available to more than two million people. Telecommunication systems are an increasingly common feature in modern healthcare. However, making teleconsultations available to the entire population covered by a public health system is a challenging goal.

Design/methodology/approach

This retrospective longitudinal observational study analyzed how this modality was used at the primary care level in Galicia, a region in the Northwest of Spain, in 2014 and 2015, focusing on demand, gender and age preferences, rural vs urban population and efficiency.

Findings

Of 28,472,852 consultations requested in this period, 9.0 percent were telephone consultations. Women requested more telephone consultations (9.9 percent of total consultations) than men (7.7 percent of total consultations). The highest demand occurred for the over 85 age group for both men and women. In both years, 2014 and 2015, the number of telephone consultations per inhabitant was higher in urban (0.53 and 0.69) than in rural areas (0.34 and 0.47). In 10.9 percent of cases, the telephone consultations required further face-to-face consultation.

Originality/value

Conventional voice telephone calls can efficiently replace conventional face-to-face consultations in primary healthcare in roughly 10 percent of cases. Women are more likely than men to use primary care services in both face-to-face and telephone consultation modalities. Public healthcare systems should consider implementing telephone consultations to deliver their services.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2016

Miriam Jankalova

A system of fixed defined criteria and indicators that would provide a complex picture of the telephone service provision by a particular company does not exist. The…

Abstract

Purpose

A system of fixed defined criteria and indicators that would provide a complex picture of the telephone service provision by a particular company does not exist. The purpose of this paper is to propose a telephone service index which represents one of the possibilities how to solve problems related to the decision-making of a customer regarding the selection of a telecommunication company.

Design/methodology/approach

The author has performed a primary research on the sample of 402 respondents from various regions of Slovakia with the aim to determine the rate of importance of criteria and their individual indicators when assessing the telephone service provision. With regard to the nature of the proposal, mathematical-statistical methods and secondary research were applied.

Findings

Although the decisive factor of assessment of the telephone service provision by the telecommunication company is the ability of such company to meet and satisfy requirements and needs of customers, indices of situation are indicators of criteria quality, price, availability and individual partial indices. On the grounds of achieved results, the discriminatory function is presented, i.e. the telephone service index, being most suitable for a quantitative assessment of the telephone service provision.

Practical/implications

The telephone service index can be applied in the area of regulation; it contributes to the support of effective economic competition to the development of domestic market and to support and taking into account interests of citizens.

Social/implications

The index represents a source of information for three subjects operating on the telephone service market (regulatory office, service provider and service user). It provides content, form and method for publishing of different information that provides the users with the access to complete comparable and user-friendly information.

Originality/value

It concerns the quantitative assessment of the telephone service provision by means of numerical indicators with differentiated weight. The proposed telephone service index represents a discriminatory function enabling the differentiation of telecommunication companies with regard to quality, price and availability of this service for customers.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

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