Search results

1 – 10 of 28
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2020

Vincent Chanethom

This study describes a telecollaborative project in an upper-level French language course at an American university from the students’ perspectives. The project involved…

Abstract

This study describes a telecollaborative project in an upper-level French language course at an American university from the students’ perspectives. The project involved synchronous computer-mediated communications via the online videoconference platform Skype between US-based French language learners and French native speakers in France. In order to increase the participants’ interest and engagement in the virtual exchanges, the telecollaboration employed critical approaches in the task design. In this telecollaboration, students were asked not only to take part in an intercultural exchange with their partners on potentially sensitive topics that included freedom (e.g., freedom of speech, religious liberty), globalization (e.g., child labor), and immigration (e.g., racism, xenophobia), but also to engage in a short debate on these topics. An online anonymous survey was used to solicit their reactions and attitudes toward this critical approach, as well as toward the technology-enhanced learning activity as a whole. The qualitative analysis of the students’ responses showed that the telecollaboration project was generally well received, despite the inclusion of sensitive topics. Most students indicated that they felt most challenged by and most apprehensive about the topic of immigration, which was attributed to the concurrent complex socio-political situation at the time they participated in the telecollaboration project. High levels of anxiety were also reported from the youngest participants, those who majored or minored in other disciplines than French, and non-degree students. This exploratory study calls for more data and an in-depth analysis of the student’s discourse, especially with respect to potential differences in pragmatic strategies used for addressing sensitive versus less sensitive topics in the target language during virtual exchanges with native speakers in that target language.

Details

Technology-enhanced Learning and Linguistic Diversity: Strategies and Approaches to Teaching Students in a 2nd or 3rd Language
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-128-8

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 28 February 2017

Carine Ullom

This chapter describes the special advantages of globally networked learning experiences (GNLE) for engendering cognitive complexity as a means for developing mindful…

Abstract

This chapter describes the special advantages of globally networked learning experiences (GNLE) for engendering cognitive complexity as a means for developing mindful global citizenship among undergraduate students. Practitioners discover pedagogical approaches that take advantage of the possibility of direct communication with the cultural “other” afforded by recent advances in cost-free, user-friendly, robust, and reliable technologies. Examples of effective pedagogical practices, ideas for building successful faculty-to-faculty partnerships, suggestions for preparing participants, guidelines for selecting and implementing appropriate technologies, and resources for further exploration are provided.

Details

Engaging Dissonance: Developing Mindful Global Citizenship in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-154-4

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2020

Abstract

Details

Technology-enhanced Learning and Linguistic Diversity: Strategies and Approaches to Teaching Students in a 2nd or 3rd Language
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-128-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Jayne M. Leh, Maike Grau and John A. Guiseppe

– The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of online intercultural exchange (OIE) to mediate a cross-cultural project with pre-service teachers in two countries.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of online intercultural exchange (OIE) to mediate a cross-cultural project with pre-service teachers in two countries.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a population of convenience, students from one American and one German university were assigned to mixed multi-cultural project groups and collaborated outside of class to address the importance of diversity in education; two weeks later, students met face-to-face as a large group and discussed their findings. All students completed pre- and post-surveys to assess cultural preconceptions, pedagogical beliefs regarding technology-mediated instruction and globalization.

Findings

Pre- and post-surveys and reflective essays indicated that OIE reduced concerns before meeting face-to-face and the process successfully facilitated a deeper understanding of cultural diversity in education.

Research limitations/implications

Generalizing results given the limited time frame of OIE and face-to-face interactions to other populations is cautioned. Future research should investigate extended interactions.

Originality/value

These results suggest the value of OIE with these pre-service teachers as an integrated method for teaching language and culture, broadening understanding of cultural diversity, and promoting familiarity in culturally diverse settings prior to an international field experience.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2020

Chesla Ann Lenkaitis, Shannon M. Hilliker and Luis Y. Castañeda

All humans have an innate ability to learn multiple languages and with ­increasing mobility across linguistic boundaries, people are more than ever embracing…

Abstract

All humans have an innate ability to learn multiple languages and with ­increasing mobility across linguistic boundaries, people are more than ever embracing multilingualism. This chapter examines international students’ perceptions of their third language (L3) learning experience in their second language (L2) English context. Challenges and strategies of L3 learning are explored as data from a survey and interviews were analyzed. Twenty-eight (n = 28) international students were asked to answer Likert-scale and ­open-­ended questions regarding their L3 learning experience. Select ­participants were also interviewed. The quantitative and qualitative results show that learning an L3 not only offered international students an opportunity to strengthen their understanding of the relationship between language and culture, but also allowed them to position themselves as multilinguals within the globalized world context. Furthermore, the data reveal that technology is an integral part of international students’ L3 learning process, but that additional support is needed. This chapter also discusses ideas including technology-e­nhanced language learning to assist international students in their L3 learning experience in higher education.

Details

Technology-enhanced Learning and Linguistic Diversity: Strategies and Approaches to Teaching Students in a 2nd or 3rd Language
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-128-8

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Luana Ferreira-Lopes, Iciar Elexpuru-Albizuri and María José Bezanilla

Allowing for interaction with foreign cultures without the need to travel, intercultural virtual collaboration represents a potential tool to develop business students…

Abstract

Purpose

Allowing for interaction with foreign cultures without the need to travel, intercultural virtual collaboration represents a potential tool to develop business students’ intercultural competence. This study aims to explore students’ perceptions towards the implementation of a research-based task sequence in a project in which undergraduate Business students from Spain collaborated virtually with undergraduate business students from The Netherlands during a semester. More specifically, this paper investigates what intercultural competence indicators were mostly developed by the sequence implemented; how much each task from the sequence in question developed different intercultural competence indicators; and how much students enjoyed participating in each task.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected through after-task reflection questionnaires. A quantitative analysis of Likert-type questions was carried out and open-ended responses were used to illustrate findings.

Findings

Results reveal that the task sequence developed different dimensions of students’ intercultural competence and, particularly, fostered a positive attitude towards intercultural relationships, increased students’ cultural knowledge and awareness and equipped students with skills to work in diverse teams. It also showed that as complexity grew along the sequence, the average students’ perception of their intercultural competence development tended to decrease. The majority of students’ very much liked participating in the different tasks.

Originality/value

Designing telecollaborative projects can be very challenging and understanding the learning potential of different pedagogical strategies for virtual collaborative environments can help teachers to take better-informed decisions.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 February 2020

Luana Ferreira-Lopes and Ingrid Van Rompay-Bartels

Universities have increasingly been adopting intercultural virtual collaboration (IVC) to connect and develop the intercultural competence of students from different…

Downloads
408

Abstract

Purpose

Universities have increasingly been adopting intercultural virtual collaboration (IVC) to connect and develop the intercultural competence of students from different locations. However, the design and implementation of IVC have proved to be challenging, and thus there is a need for sharing positive experiences. This paper explores students’ overall impressions toward their participation in an IVC project involving a Spanish and Dutch university and discusses the on-going improvement process inherent to such practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This article presents (a) the results obtained from a content analysis of students’ feedback collected through a satisfaction survey, and (b) the observations of participating teachers on the challenges encountered during the implementation of the intercultural virtual collaborative project.

Findings

The analysis shows the potential of IVC to develop different aspects of students’ intercultural competence, especially intercultural teamwork, awareness and skills. Students appreciated the experience of working in intercultural teams, “the real-life application” of the project and the opportunity to gain cultural knowledge. At the institutional level, the biggest challenge related to aligning participating institutions’ courses, schedules, and grading systems. At the classroom level, it is argued that interaction between students should happen gradually. The discussion also approaches how partnerships between universities and companies could contribute to making training in intercultural virtual collaboration more authentic.

Originality/value

Given its impact on the development of students’ intercultural competence, the intercultural virtual collaborative project has been recognized as a best-practice in both universities, being officially incorporated into the curriculum of the participating institutions and replicated to other subject areas.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2020

Abstract

Details

Technology-enhanced Learning and Linguistic Diversity: Strategies and Approaches to Teaching Students in a 2nd or 3rd Language
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-128-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 25 September 2020

Vaibhav Jadhav, Dianne Chambers and Dipak Tatpuje

While many low-income countries are signatories to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), providing for the needs of students…

Abstract

While many low-income countries are signatories to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), providing for the needs of students with disabilities in these countries is often difficult. Many governments in low-income countries experience difficulties in obtaining and supplying appropriate assistive devices and products to people in need; have issues with poor infrastructure and in general lack appropriate knowledge around the types of assistive technologies (ATs) available and how to use these to assist people with disabilities. The authors of this chapter will discuss the use of low-tech AT for students with disabilities in low-income countries, the benefits for inclusion and the difficulties involved. Reference to India will be used to explore the use of low-tech AT in a low-income country. Included in the chapter will be information on an innovative problem-based learning project implemented in six countries (five of which may be considered low-income countries), undertaken with preservice and in-service teachers.

Details

Assistive Technology to Support Inclusive Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-520-7

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Mairéad Nic Giolla Mhichíl, Christine Appel, Colm Ó Ciardubháin, Sake Jager and Adriana Prizel-Kania

The purpose of this paper is to report on SpeakApps, a major collaborative computer-assisted language learning project, developed based on an open source…

Downloads
671

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on SpeakApps, a major collaborative computer-assisted language learning project, developed based on an open source techno-pedagogical solution to facilitate online oral language production and interaction.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed method approach was incorporated as part of the development process which included a comprehensive literature and practice review, user requirement survey of 815 learner, 61 pilot studies with 7,180 students, construction of qualitative teaching scenarios and a Delphi analysis.

Findings

Language learners have limited experience of using synchronous communication tools within language learning contexts. Improving usability features within the Open Educational Resources supported the notion of sustainability and that the provision of the mechanism to indicate quality were vital to support the integrity of open content.

Originality/value

The paper provides an overview of the operationalisation of an action-oriented approach to language learning which manifested as a design for learning development process. It illustrates the breadth of issues raised from technical to pedagogical when teacher and learner agency are central for development and sustainability.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

Keywords

1 – 10 of 28