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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2019

Haytham Siala, Elmar Kutsch and Suzy Jagger

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether learners from different cultures adopt a serious 3D game to facilitate the learning of transferable managerial skills…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether learners from different cultures adopt a serious 3D game to facilitate the learning of transferable managerial skills (ethics) and knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional, cross-country survey study (n=319) was conducted recruiting participants from one North American and two British universities. The survey data and the conceptual model have been analysed and tested using confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling.

Findings

Participants displayed positive attitudes towards the 3D game and responded positively to theory presented as “real-life” scenarios; gamification techniques such as interactions and dialogue, and rewards and progression levels, which are part of the game, albeit the participants’ adoption was driven more by extrinsic motivations (rewards) than intrinsic ones (ease of use and entertainment). In addition, the empirical results suggest that when gender is taken into account, the perceptions and needs of cross-cultural learners in serious gaming environments vary and display characteristics that are similar to Rogers’ five adopter categories; thus, culture could significantly shape learners’ decisions to adopt a serious game as a managerial learning tool.

Research limitations/implications

For future researchers, this paper highlights various levels of training, support and promotional awareness that need to be considered to facilitate the adoption of serious games for managerial learning.

Practical implications

For academics and practitioners in work-based learning and managerial training environments, this paper highlights the salient factors that need to be inherent in a serious 3D game, and best practices for scaffolding existing instructional approaches or training interventions.

Originality/value

In light of Rogers’ five adopter categories, this cross-country study involving culturally diverse learners provides key insight into the potential application of serious games as a practice-based learning instrument in academia and industry.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2020

Jennifer L. Cox, Claire Ellen Seaman, Sarah Hyde, Katharine M. Freire and Jacqueline Mansfield

There are growing expectations that students graduating from health courses and current health professionals have some proficiency in using telehealth. However, there is…

Abstract

Purpose

There are growing expectations that students graduating from health courses and current health professionals have some proficiency in using telehealth. However, there is limited accessibility to multidisciplinary-based material to meet this need. This paper describes the development of an online telehealth education resource using a co-design approach and the strengths and challenges of embedding authentic learning principles in an open-access online course with a broad target audience.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors first describe the co-design process of the course and discuss the pedagogy underpinning the course design. Then learner enrolment data is discussed to evidence uptake across key characteristics. Finally, the authors assess the efficacy of the co-design approach by analysing feedback collected from learners at the end of the course.

Findings

The course is structured across four modules and comprises interactive content, reflective tasks, case studies and purposefully developed digital material. Responses from the working group and from learner feedback indicate that the course is an authentic and relevant introduction to telehealth practice for both health students and current health professionals, despite some limitations.

Originality/value

This case study demonstrates the value of a co-design process and key learning design choices in online course development to meet the educational needs of learners from broad disciplinary backgrounds, in various stages of learning/understanding of telehealth and/or requiring a practice-based resource in the context of a rapidly changing policy environment.

Details

Health Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Suzie Moon, David Birchall, Sadie Williams and Charalambos Vrasidas

This paper reports on the development of a workplace‐based e‐learning programme for small and medium enterprise (SME) managers in five European countries. The course is…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reports on the development of a workplace‐based e‐learning programme for small and medium enterprise (SME) managers in five European countries. The course is designed to address the specific needs of SME managers who, it has been noted, represent a significant proportion of the EU workforce but often experience difficulty in finding time or resources to undertake relevant training. The aim of this paper is to present the design principles developed to underpin the programme. These principles were developed specifically to address the need for greater pedagogic structure in the design of e‐learning courses.

Design/methodology/approach

The course design was informed by a literature review of e‐learning and management learning and by a set of focus groups conducted to identify the specific concerns of SMEs with regard to accelerating their learning in the workplace. The course structure was further refined through trial workshops in all five partner countries.

Findings

The paper presents a pedagogic framework and a structured set of design features, both of which were built into the course as a result of the research undertaken. It also provides reflections on the efficacy of the design process that resulted in the formation of the design principles, and also the prospects for e‐learning programmes in supporting accelerated learning in the workplace.

Practical implications

The design process and reflections may usefully be extracted to inform other cross‐national or SME‐focused e‐learning programmes.

Originality/value

The paper draws on theory and research data to demonstrate the importance of thorough research in e‐learning course development.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 17 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 April 2021

J. Ben Arbaugh, Alvin Hwang, Jeffrey J. McNally, Charles J. Fornaciari and Lisa A. Burke-Smalley

This paper aims to compare the nature of three different business and management education (BME) research streams (online/blended learning, entrepreneurship education and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to compare the nature of three different business and management education (BME) research streams (online/blended learning, entrepreneurship education and experiential learning), along with their citation sources to draw insights on their support and legitimacy bases, with lessons on improving such support and legitimacy for the streams and the wider BME research field.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyze the nature of three BME research streams and their citation sources through tests of differences across streams.

Findings

The three streams differ in research foci and approaches such as the use of managerial samples in experiential learning, quantitative studies in online/blended education and literature reviews in entrepreneurship education. They also differ in sources of legitimacy recognition and avenues for mobilization of support. The underlying literature development pattern of the experiential learning stream indicates a need for BME scholars to identify and build on each other’s work.

Research limitations/implications

Identification of different research bases and key supporting literature in the different streams shows important core articles that are useful to build research in each stream.

Practical implications

Readers will understand the different research bases supporting the three research streams, along with their targeted audience and practice implications.

Social implications

The discovery of different support bases for the three different streams helps identify the network of authors and relationships that have been built in each stream.

Originality/value

According to the authors’ knowledge, this paper is the first to uncover differences in nature and citation sources of the three continuously growing BME research streams with recommendations on ways to improve the support of the three streams.

Details

Organization Management Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN:

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 May 2020

Md Nahin Hossain, Md. Shamim Talukder, Abul Khayer and Yukun Bao

In the era of m-learning environments, multiple factors have been considered to explain adult learners' continuance usage intention, but largely without considering the…

Abstract

Purpose

In the era of m-learning environments, multiple factors have been considered to explain adult learners' continuance usage intention, but largely without considering the role of specific configurations of variables and how they may affect learners' intention. The purpose of this study is to show how cognitive need, subjective norms, perceived usefulness, satisfaction, confirmation, attitude and perceived ease of use combine to predict learners' frequent use intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

It is empirically validated through configurational analysis, using fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA) on 211 adult learners with experience in using Mobile learning applications (MLA).

Findings

The findings show learners' satisfaction of MLA usage combined with the cognitive need and attitude were found to be core conditions reinforcing learners' continuance intention.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted in the context of adult learners MLA whereby the motivations for continued usage and the nature of technological innovation could differ. In this regard, findings from this study may not be generalizable to other technological contexts.

Practical implications

In the planning and development of learning apps, software developers should pay attention to practical functions and extend key features that are frequently required for solving a problem using the new skill. On the marketing side, MLA companies should emphasize the full functionality of their apps to cater efficiently to the different needs and expectations of the learners.

Originality/value

This study contributes by extending existing knowledge on how cognitive need, satisfaction and attitude combine to increase or mitigate continuance intention to use toward the development of new configurational theories. This study fills the gap in the literature by introducing adult learners' continuance intention to use MLA and introducing through a methodological approach of fsQCA in adult learners' context.

Details

Journal of Research in Innovative Teaching & Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-7604

Keywords

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