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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Omran AlShamsi and Mian Ajmal

The purpose of this paper is to identify the critical factors that impact knowledge sharing (KS) and their importance in technology-intensive service organizations in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the critical factors that impact knowledge sharing (KS) and their importance in technology-intensive service organizations in the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

Design/methodology/approach

An extensive literature review was conducted to identify the critical factors for KS in technology-intensive organizations. Then, an analytical hierarchical process (AHP) was applied to prioritize the primary criteria and sub-criteria. This study consists of nine primary criteria and 34 sub-criteria that are relevant to KS in technology-intensive organizations.

Findings

The results show that organizational leadership (OL) is the most important factor that impacts KS in technology-intensive organizations, which is followed by organizational culture (OC), organizational strategy (OSY), corporate performance (CP), organizational process (OP), employee engagement (EE) and organizational structure (OST). According to the results, the least impactful factor is human resource management (HRM).

Research limitations/implications

Because the results in this study were only obtained from service organizations, future studies can include manufacturing organizations from different countries and additional success factors. Future studies could also use structural equational modelling methodology for better understanding the relations among these critical factors for KS.

Originality value

This paper is one of the first in the UAE to examine the broad range of critical success factors for KS in technology-intensive organizations.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 14 July 2014

Sanjay Mohapatra and Rahul Thakurta

– Knowledge management strategy.

Abstract

Subject area

Knowledge management strategy.

Study level/applicability

Small and medium organizations providing technology solutions.

Case overview

This case presents the developments in BATOI, as it intends to proliferate its services and offerings. BATOI offers an enterprise-class cloud computing platform along with a set of software applications, a business social network and different online information and service portals catering to large audience at the global level. The organization focuses on customer satisfaction as an integral part of the value chain. The case presents the knowledge management (KM) initiatives that were introduced in BATOI as a part of the organization's strategy for growth and acquiring new customers. Based on the business goals of BATOI, the KM-related goals were identified as part of designing the KM strategy. Designing of the KM strategy further assisted BATOI to retain competent employees, and along the way, addressed the major concern of attrition that plagues many established organizations. To conclude, some of the future concerns of BATOI are indicated at the end of the case. The analysis of the case takes into account the KM challenges faced by BATOI and the necessary steps in successfully implementing a KM strategy in an organization.

Expected learning outcomes

The objective of this teaching case is as follows: to understand how KM is central to an organization's growth strategy; to appreciate the importance of KM in technology-intensive organizations; to understand the process of deriving the KM goals from the over arching business goals of an organization; and to comprehend the challenges associated with implementing KM strategy for the first time in an organization.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email: support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Christer Karlsson and Martin Sköld

The purpose of this paper is to identify areas and issues for management to consider in balancing specialization and commonalization in large manufacturing corporations…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify areas and issues for management to consider in balancing specialization and commonalization in large manufacturing corporations with multiple brands from a strategic R&D and manufacturing point of view.

Design/methodology/approach

Three global manufacturing corporations from the automotive sector are used as a strategic sample composing three sequential clinical research projects. The data come from complementary data-gathering methods combining documents and interviews and workshops with top executives, project leaders, platform managers and product brand managers, thus enabling triangulation.

Findings

The study shows that managing manufacturing corporations with multiple brands is not just on a scale between full specialization and full commonalization but instead has its own logic of categorizations and portfolio formations. In order to develop the value of the brand portfolio, management must simultaneously embrace and address a number of highly integrated corporate values and highly differentiated brand company values.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes primarily by relating economy of scale in relation to the need for differentiation of products and brands that have different values, customers and market positions. A model for balancing commonalization and specialization provides several opportunities for further research and development; however, generalizations are issue and context specific.

Practical implications

The critical issues in balancing how to deal with specialization and commonalization in a company with multiple brands are explored and summarized in a framework for the practitioner to use in analyzing a real situation.

Originality/value

Previous literature focuses on the maximization of synergies within one brand, missing the specific dynamics of large manufacturing corporations with many entities, such as individual products and brands. This paper adds knowledge regarding how to balance synergies from commonalization with important objectives to preserve the specialization and distinctiveness of each product brand.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2019

Omran Mohamed AlShamsi and Mian M. Ajmal

This purpose of this paper is to identify and prioritize the critical factors impacting knowledge sharing (KS) in technology-intensive manufacturing organizations in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this paper is to identify and prioritize the critical factors impacting knowledge sharing (KS) in technology-intensive manufacturing organizations in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and to propose a decision-making framework for KS.

Design/methodology/approach

Analytical Hierarchical Process method is used to identify these critical factors impacting KS in technology-intensive manufacturing organizations in the UAE.

Findings

Results show that organizational leadership and culture are the most critical factors impacting KS in the technology-intensive manufacturing organizations.

Research limitations/implications

The data are collected from technology-intensive manufacturing organizations in the UAE; therefore, these cannot be generalized to other locations. Future research in different countries is required.

Practical implications

To implement successful KS practices in technology-intensive manufacturing organizations, it is essential that all impacting factors and sub-factors are well understood within the organizations.

Originality/value

This study is among the first studies in the region that presents a comprehensive framework for KS in manufacturing sector.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Silicon Valley North
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08044-457-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2008

Reviews the latest management development across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

Reviews the latest management development across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Is it possible to purposefully create a community that increases organizational performance in a technology‐intensive organization? In large companies, technical knowledge is dispersed over individual specialists, business units and locations. For that reason, knowledge sharing and mutual learning among organization members is important for the short term effectiveness and long term survival of any organization. This study of communities of practices (CoPs) at Rolls‐Royce shows that CoPs are a valuable structure for technology and knowledge management, although never fully under managerial control.

Practical implications

Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 31 July 2009

Omar Lizardo

The “first generation” (Lammers, 1978, p. 486) of comparative analysis of organizations in sociology (e.g., Blau, 1965; Stinchcombe, 1959) focused on the “nuts and bolts”…

Abstract

The “first generation” (Lammers, 1978, p. 486) of comparative analysis of organizations in sociology (e.g., Blau, 1965; Stinchcombe, 1959) focused on the “nuts and bolts” of organizational structure as the key criterion with which to derive organizational typologies (Perrow, 1967; Pugh, Hickson, & Hinings, 1969). This initial cohort of analysts saw the intrinsic features – or “organizational attributes” (Blau, 1965, p. 326) – constitutive of the “technical core” of the organization, such as features related to the organization of the production process (Perrow, 1967) or the structure of allocation of discretion and authority (e.g., Etzioni, 1961), as the royal road to the development of a cogent approach to comparative analysis of organizations.

Details

Studying Differences between Organizations: Comparative Approaches to Organizational Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-647-8

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Rodrigo Martín‐Rojas, Víctor J. García‐Morales and Antonio Mihi‐Ramírez

The aim of this paper is to highlight the importance of different technological aspects of organizations for Spanish firms' performance through organizational learning and

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to highlight the importance of different technological aspects of organizations for Spanish firms' performance through organizational learning and corporate entrepreneurship (where organizational innovation is essential).

Design/methodology/approach

The relationships studied are confirmed empirically using a structural equation model to demonstrate the hypotheses. The sample was selected from the database Dun & Bradstreet España for 2003, obtaining 201 Spanish firms. CEOs were the main informants.

Findings

The results show that the support adopted by top managers will directly influence the organizational learning process, technological distinctive competencies and corporate entrepreneurship. Technological distinctive competencies are also supported by organizational slack resources, technological skills and a technological infrastructure. Finally, corporate entrepreneurship influences organizational performance.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is exploratory in character, and its goal is to show whether interrelations exist between the variables. The main limitations are: the sectors chosen refer only to Spain; the analysis performed is cross‐sectional; and a single method and self‐reports are used.

Practical implications

The paper shows that to obtain perfect adaptation of the firm to its environment, it is crucial that managers develop corporate entrepreneurship, especially innovation, to improve high‐technology sector firms' performance.

Originality/value

The paper seeks to stimulate new lines of research regarding technological distinctive competencies, organizational learning and corporate entrepreneurship and to relate them to other constructs, observing their repercussions for the firm.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

John Israilidis, Evangelia Siachou, Louise Cooke and Russell Lock

The purpose of this paper is to identify individual variables with an impact on knowledge sharing and explore the under-discussed construct of employees’ ignorance. This…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify individual variables with an impact on knowledge sharing and explore the under-discussed construct of employees’ ignorance. This can enhance the knowledge-sharing process and facilitate the development of greater intellectual capital.

Design/methodology/approach

Eighty-four dependent variables affecting knowledge sharing are analyzed and classified into 11 categories. In addition, the direct effect of employees’ ignorance on knowledge sharing is introduced and empirically investigated in a case study of a multinational organization operating within the aerospace and defense industry.

Findings

The findings suggest that employees’ ignorance may negatively affect their intention to share knowledge, thus leading to poor decision-making and communication in organizations. Employees’ ignorance could also limit the organizational ability to repel external threats, implement innovation and manage future risks.

Originality/value

A classification scheme based on different categories of employees’ ignorance is developed, providing tailor-made recommendations for practitioners facing different types of ill-informed organizational scenarios. Further, the need to shift the emphasis away from the management of knowledge to the management of ignorance is also an important contribution of this paper.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 September 2020

Armando Papa, Roberto Chierici, Luca Vincenzo Ballestra, Dirk Meissner and Mehmet A. Orhan

This study aims to investigate the effects of open innovation (OI) and big data analytics (BDA) on reflective knowledge exchange (RKE) within the context of complex…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the effects of open innovation (OI) and big data analytics (BDA) on reflective knowledge exchange (RKE) within the context of complex collaborative networks. Specifically, it considers the relationships between sourcing knowledge from an external environment, transferring knowledge to an external environment and adopting solutions that are useful to appropriate returns from innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

This study analyzes the connection between the number of patent applications and the amount of OI, as well as the association between the number of patent applications and the use of BDA. Data from firms in the 27 European Union countries were retrieved from the Eurostat database for the period 2014–2019 and were investigated using an ordinary least squares regression analysis.

Findings

Because of its twofold lens based on both knowledge management and OI, this study sheds light on OI collaboration modes and highlights the crucial role they could play in innovation. In particular, the results suggest that OI collaboration modes have a strong effect on innovation performance, stimulating the search for RKE.

Originality/value

This study furthers a deeper understanding of RKE, which is shown to be an important mechanism that incentivizes firms to increase their efforts in the innovation process. Further, RKE supports firms in taking full advantage of the innovative knowledge they generate within their inter-organizational network.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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