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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2021

Jesús F. Lampón and Elena Rivo-López

The paper aims to explore the influence of the industry technology intensity on the drivers of manufacturing backshoring.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explore the influence of the industry technology intensity on the drivers of manufacturing backshoring.

Design/methodology/approach

An analysis of backshoring factors in recent cases of backshoring in the European manufacturing industry based on original qualitative and quantitative information collected from different databases. This analysis was performed using different econometric models applied to samples of firms classified by technology intensity of industries.

Findings

Drivers of backshoring are conditioned by the technology intensity of the industries. The models that analyse firms classified by technology intensity of the industries have a good explanatory capacity with few key factors. In industries with low-technology intensity, backshoring is a cost-oriented strategy and the drivers are linked to internal process optimisation and external factors related to labour and logistics costs in the host location. In industries with high-technology intensity, backshoring is mainly an innovation-oriented strategy and the key drivers are those related to the internal innovation capacity for improvement of the technological level of manufacturing processes. The research also identifies the more suitable theoretical approaches for explaining backshoring drivers in each type of industry according to its technology intensity.

Originality/value

This research analyses the backshoring drivers by means of models applied to firms classified by the technology intensity of industries. It also reinforces the dynamic perspective of time to analyse backshoring as a reassessment of location decisions made after prior offshoring.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2014

Hans T. W. Frankort

Firms tend to transfer more knowledge in technology joint ventures compared to contractual technology agreements. Using insights from new institutional economics, this…

Abstract

Firms tend to transfer more knowledge in technology joint ventures compared to contractual technology agreements. Using insights from new institutional economics, this chapter explores to what extent the alliance governance association with interfirm knowledge transfer is sensitive to an evolving industry norm of collaboration connected to the logic of open innovation. The chapter examines 1,888 dyad-year observations on firms engaged in technology alliances in the U.S. information technology industry during 1980–1999. Using fixed effects linear models, it analyzes longitudinal changes in the alliance governance association with interfirm knowledge transfer, and how such changes vary in magnitude across bilateral versus multipartner alliances, and across computers, telecommunications equipment, software, and microelectronics subsectors. Increases in industry-level alliance activity during 1980–1999 improved the knowledge transfer performance of contractual technology agreements relative to more hierarchical equity joint ventures. This effect was concentrated in bilateral rather than multipartner alliances, and in the software and microelectronics rather than computers and telecommunications equipment subsectors. Therefore, an evolving industry norm of collaboration may sometimes make more arms-length governance of a technology alliance a credible substitute for equity ownership, which can reduce the costs of interfirm R&D. Overall, the chapter shows that the performance of material practices that constitute innovation ecosystems, such as interfirm technology alliances, may differ over time subject to prevailing institutional norms of open innovation. This finding generates novel implications for the literatures on alliances, open innovation, and innovation ecosystems.

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2019

Quan Chen, Jing-An Wang, Ruiqiu Ou, Junhua Sun and Li-Chung Chang

Disruptive technologies often disrupt the careers of middle-skilled workers. The purpose of this paper is to investigate career transition strategies of middle-skilled…

Abstract

Purpose

Disruptive technologies often disrupt the careers of middle-skilled workers. The purpose of this paper is to investigate career transition strategies of middle-skilled workers that partially continue or expand their careers under the condition of disruptive technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper established a conceptual framework of career transition strategies for middle-skilled workers by integrating the existing studies of disruptive technologies, technological trajectory transition, boundaryless and protean careers, and careers as repositories of knowledge.

Findings

The authors proposed three types of career transition strategies to partially prolong middle-skilled workers’ careers, namely, industry-oriented transition strategy which refers to a transfer to other occupations in the original industry, technology-oriented transition strategy which refers to a transfer to occupations with original technical skills in other industries, and comprehensive transition strategy which refers to a transfer to other occupations in the related industries. Further, this paper discusses the external conditions and individual competencies for each career transition strategy, and timing for implementing a career transition strategy from the perspective of the technology life cycle.

Originality/value

This paper focused on sustainable careers of middle-skilled workers under the condition of disruptive technologies, which received very little attention from the current literature. The findings also suggested for middle-skilled workers to develop a sustainable or long-term career in the current era of many disruptive technologies. The findings may also imply on how firms and government should contribute to help workers on handling scenarios of technological disruption.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Valentin H. Pashtenko, Matthew H. Roy and Sanjiv S. Dugal

Examines non‐linear adaptation to change in the high‐technology environment of the computer industry. These environments are defined, and the efficacy of different…

Abstract

Examines non‐linear adaptation to change in the high‐technology environment of the computer industry. These environments are defined, and the efficacy of different organizational adaptations is assessed with respect to these environments. Results from our analyses show that there is a direct and causal relationship between the employment of non‐linear organizational archetypes and organizational effectiveness within high‐technology industries.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2019

Bojun Hou, Jin Hong, Qiong Chen, Xing Shi and Yu Zhou

It is widely accepted that enterprises obtaining academic discoveries through R&D collaboration improve their innovation performance. However, it is not necessarily true

Abstract

Purpose

It is widely accepted that enterprises obtaining academic discoveries through R&D collaboration improve their innovation performance. However, it is not necessarily true in emerging economies, such as China and post-socialist countries in Europe. The purpose of this paper is to fill the gap by investigating how R&D collaboration between industry and academia (i.e. universities and research institutes) affects the industrial innovation performance; and whether and how intermediaries moderate their relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper constructs the research model according to the knowledge production function, and the pooled ordinary least square regression is used to verify our hypotheses.

Findings

Evidence from a sample of Chinese industrial enterprises in thirty provinces spanning from 2009 to 2014 suggests that R&D collaboration with research institutes (CWR) is positively related to innovation output, while R&D collaboration with universities (CWU) exerts negative effect on innovation output measured by sales revenue of new product (NPSR). The significant moderating role of technology transfer institutions is confirmed in the negative relationship between CWU and NPSR.

Originality/value

This paper empirically examines the moderating role of intermediary organisations in academia–industry cooperation and industrial innovation, and has practical implications for the government to formulate policies to improve the quality and effectiveness of cooperation between academic and industrial sectors. These results vary in inland and coastal areas, which suggest the policy makers to formulate policies according to local conditions not only in China but also in other countries, like European countries.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

Michael E. Porter

Technological innovations can have Important strategic implications for individual companies and can greatly influence industries as a whole. Yet, not all technological…

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36247

Abstract

Technological innovations can have Important strategic implications for individual companies and can greatly influence industries as a whole. Yet, not all technological change is strategically beneficial. This article focuses on ways to recognize and exploit the competitive significance of change.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1984

Robert G. Cooper

Product innovation is central to the success of most companies. The rewards of a successful innovation programme are highly visible in terms of sales, profits and growth…

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1885

Abstract

Product innovation is central to the success of most companies. The rewards of a successful innovation programme are highly visible in terms of sales, profits and growth. But not so apparent are the strategies that underlie these product innovation efforts. This monograph is about the ingredients of a winning new product strategy — about strategic decisions on markets, technologies, products — that result in a successful innovation programme.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 29 March 2016

Marc Wouters, Susana Morales, Sven Grollmuss and Michael Scheer

The paper provides an overview of research published in the innovation and operations management (IOM) literature on 15 methods for cost management in new product…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper provides an overview of research published in the innovation and operations management (IOM) literature on 15 methods for cost management in new product development, and it provides a comparison to an earlier review of the management accounting (MA) literature (Wouters & Morales, 2014).

Methodology/approach

This structured literature search covers papers published in 23 journals in IOM in the period 1990–2014.

Findings

The search yielded a sample of 208 unique papers with 275 results (one paper could refer to multiple cost management methods). The top 3 methods are modular design, component commonality, and product platforms, with 115 results (42%) together. In the MA literature, these three methods accounted for 29%, but target costing was the most researched cost management method by far (26%). Simulation is the most frequently used research method in the IOM literature, whereas this was averagely used in the MA literature; qualitative studies were the most frequently used research method in the MA literature, whereas this was averagely used in the IOM literature. We found a lot of papers presenting practical approaches or decision models as a further development of a particular cost management method, which is a clear difference from the MA literature.

Research limitations/implications

This review focused on the same cost management methods, and future research could also consider other cost management methods which are likely to be more important in the IOM literature compared to the MA literature. Future research could also investigate innovative cost management practices in more detail through longitudinal case studies.

Originality/value

This review of research on methods for cost management published outside the MA literature provides an overview for MA researchers. It highlights key differences between both literatures in their research of the same cost management methods.

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Book part
Publication date: 24 August 2011

Tommy Tsung Ying Shih

Researchers continue to seek understanding of industrialization as a state managed process. How to create and implement new industries based on advanced knowledge is on…

Abstract

Researchers continue to seek understanding of industrialization as a state managed process. How to create and implement new industries based on advanced knowledge is on the policy agenda of many advanced nations. Measures that promote these developments include national capacity building in science and technology, the formation of technology transfer systems, and the establishment of industrial clusters. What these templates often overlook is an analysis of use. This chapter aims to increase the understanding of the processes that embed new solutions in structures from an industrial network perspective. The chapter describes an empirical study of high-technology industrialization in Taiwan that the researcher conducts to this end. The study shows that the Taiwanese industrial model is oversimplified and omits several important factors in the development of new industries. This study bases its findings on the notions that resource combination occurs in different time and space, the new always builds on existing resource structures, and the users are important as active participants in development processes.

Details

Interfirm Networks: Theory, Strategy, and Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-024-7

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 14 July 2015

Jochem T. Hummel and Nima Amiryany

This study focuses on intra-industry determinants of acquisition performance. Seven years of printed research on acquisitions from 10 top-tier business journals is…

Abstract

This study focuses on intra-industry determinants of acquisition performance. Seven years of printed research on acquisitions from 10 top-tier business journals is categorized on the basis of R&D intensity – that is, per industry classification: high-, medium-, and low-technology – and determinants of acquisition performance. Instead of broadly generalizing acquisition performance determinants across industries, this study focuses on how the practice of enhancing acquisition performance is different per industry classification and what acquiring firms need to take into account.

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