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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2008

Heather Holden, Ant Ozok and Roy Rada

The purpose of this study is to explore the current usage and acceptance of classroom technologies by secondary math/science education teachers in one community.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the current usage and acceptance of classroom technologies by secondary math/science education teachers in one community.

Design/methodology/approach

Forty‐seven secondary education math and science teachers in one American city responded to a survey about their use and perceptions of technology in their lives and classrooms.

Findings

Results indicate teachers use technology more for personal instructional reasons, such as class preparation, than for interactions with their students whether inside the classroom or outside the classroom. Primary factors inhibiting the use of technology relate to time, training, and preparation. Teachers can see the benefit of using technology to promote students’ learning experience. However, teachers are neutral about technology being advantageous for improving in‐class activities.

Originality/value

A significant connection between teachers’ technology acceptance and usage is presented.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 25 January 2013

Christina M. Partin and Skyler Lauderdale

In this chapter, we offer a thorough research compendium that bridges together theories and perspectives from various disciplines including adult and higher education…

Abstract

In this chapter, we offer a thorough research compendium that bridges together theories and perspectives from various disciplines including adult and higher education, psychology and social psychology, sociology, and women's and gender studies in order to help instructors think about ways to expand on existing activities by incorporating mobile technologies in the learning process. Based on this review of literature, we discuss the importance of motivation, participation, community, voice, and learning in higher education and offer our Interdisciplinary Model for Student-Centered Classrooms as a guide for helping instructors who want to use mobile technologies in their own classes. In the second half of the chapter, we discuss suggestions for achieving this model through the use of mobile technologies, provide several opportunities for critical reflection of this model through problem-based scenarios to stimulate applications of our model, and consider the process of infusing mobile technologies into current pedagogical techniques. Overall, this chapter provides a theoretical basis and mandate for further research and implementation of mobile technologies as useful pedagogical tools in higher education capable of increasing student retention, engagement, and positive learning outcomes in higher education.

Details

Increasing Student Engagement and Retention Using Mobile Applications: Smartphones, Skype and Texting Technologies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-509-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Hassan Mirzajani, Rosnaini Mahmud, Ahmad Fauzi Mohd Ayub and Su Luan Wong

The purpose of this study is to identify factors that affect teachers’ motivation to use information and communications technology (ICT) in the classroom. The study aims…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify factors that affect teachers’ motivation to use information and communications technology (ICT) in the classroom. The study aims to determine the extent to which selected variables, such as personal experience, school environment and technological factors, influenced teachers’ tendency to accept and utilize ICT in teaching.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used primary data sources from Mazandaran, Iran, that included field notes and semi-structured interviews.

Findings

Results revealed that adequate support from administrators, directives to teachers to use ICT, appropriate ICT skills and knowledge as well as adequate resources were important factors that influenced the utilization of ICT in the classroom. Findings also showed that insufficient technical support discouraged teachers from using ICT in teaching, while increasing adequate equipment and technical support in schools encouraged teachers in this respect.

Research limitations/implications

Because this study was conducted on a small number of participants, its findings may not apply fully to other educational institutions.

Practical implications

The results from this study would be helpful to educational departments and institutions in their formulation of policies to encourage the use of ICT in education. The findings would also give a better insight of what constitutes an environment that is conducive for learning where ICT is integrated into the classroom.

Originality/value

By focusing on teachers’ intention, this study provides important insights into which factors influence teacher attitude to use ICT into classroom. As a result, the finding will help the development of e-learning quality enhancement and assurance strategies.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Cheri MacLeod

This paper describes a small research project undertaken in a technical college in Qatar on the use of iPads in the classroom. iPads were trialed for a semester each in

Abstract

This paper describes a small research project undertaken in a technical college in Qatar on the use of iPads in the classroom. iPads were trialed for a semester each in mathematics and physics classes; students completed pre- and post-surveys. Classroom observations were carried out and interviews were conducted with both faculty (N=3) and students (N=19). Over 80% of students reported positively on the iPad as being “helpful” to “very helpful” for learning new things and course materials, for increasing their interaction with online course materials and getting course information and for exploring additional material related to course topics. Faculty perceptions of iPad use in class were also positive.

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Lisa L. Minicozzi

The purpose of this paper is to empower teacher candidates to integrate technology into classroom learning. The participating teacher candidates were provided with tools …

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empower teacher candidates to integrate technology into classroom learning. The participating teacher candidates were provided with tools – iPads and software applications to enhance their ability to better meet the needs of all K-2 students. Teacher candidates had the opportunity to explore the range of pedagogical strategies the iPad facilitated through lesson planning and instructional practice. In addition, this research study found that when teacher candidates are given individualized training on the iPad, they have greater comfort with integrating it into their daily practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed a case study approach, using both quantitative and qualitative measures. Quantitative methods included the use of two surveys to better understand how teachers have been trained on educational technology. The qualitative analysis explored how teacher candidates utilized the iPad to better meet K-2 student learning outcomes through focus group interviews.

Findings

Findings from this study suggest the need for embedded technology integration – through current graduate pedagogical coursework to better prepare K-2 teachers. Teacher candidates require time and regular practice to develop skills and understanding of how best to integrate iPad technology into their teaching. Redesigning a methodology course whereby candidates are developing a deeper understanding of pedagogy, while embedding technology into practice offers students this much needed opportunity. The findings from this study also indicate that, with appropriate training, teacher candidates have the ability to effectively integrate iPad technology into lessons which benefit student learning.

Research limitations/implications

Researchers should be asking whether teacher preparation programs are effectively training teachers for the twenty-first century classroom. This research explores this question and suggests ways to improve current programs to better prepare candidates to meet the variety of learning needs in today’s classrooms. Although the study was small in scale it has broader implications for teacher education programs.

Practical implications

Addressing the diversity of students’ learning needs present in today’s classrooms is a common goal for all teachers. As evidenced through the findings, having the ability to access a variety of learning resources, in particular, iPads, will help teacher candidates better achieve this goal. This research demonstrated how teacher candidates used the iPad to support differentiated instruction in K-2 classrooms.

Social implications

A one size fits all approach to learning does not work and teachers need to have access to every available resource, including iPad technology, to individualize learning. Findings from this study recommend providing teacher candidates with multiple opportunities to practice utilizing the iPad as a means to adapt, modify, and differentiate instruction to meet the variety of learning needs in K-2 classrooms.

Originality/value

It is important to note that while iPad integration throughout K-2 classrooms is on the rise, there is still limited research in how this technology is actually being used by teachers. This study explored how eight teacher candidates implemented the iPad as a technology tool within K-2 inclusive classrooms.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2019

Victoria Lynn Lowell and James Michael Morris Jr

The purpose of this paper is to discuss potential challenges learners from different generations may have with current instructional methods using educational technologies

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss potential challenges learners from different generations may have with current instructional methods using educational technologies in the classroom. The authors hope to create awareness to help improve equity in learning opportunities and assist educators in understanding the needs of multigenerational classrooms.

Design/methodology/approach

In a narrative review of the literature, the authors present the current findings of the literature on generations in higher education and concerns for equity in learning opportunities.

Findings

It is commonplace in undergraduate programs for learners of multiple generations to attend classes together and research has shown that historical context and generational experiences affect the values, attitudes and learning preferences of each generation. Therefore, higher education institutions should be aware of the demographic profile of their students, as well as the external populations from which they may recruit students, to ensure they are cognizant of the needs of these populations and can provide equality in learning opportunities.

Practical implications

To assist with the needs of this changing student population, university leaders must consider generational characteristics to ensure equity in learning opportunity. Specifically, university leaders and educators in the classrooms will need to adapt and adjust for a changing student population providing instruction that meets the needs of multiple generations of learners, often within one classroom.

Originality/value

Often when we think of diversity in the classroom we think of age, gender, race or even culture. Today we must add diversity in generations. Unlike other equity issues in education such as access (McLaughlin, 2010), educators may not be considering the equity in the design of their instruction to provide equitable learning experiences based on a learners’ knowledge and skills established by their experiences with technology. The lack of knowledge and skills a learner has with technology based on their experiences may create barriers to their ability to understand and complete instructional content involving technology (Wager, 2005). To ensure all learners can be successful, educators should strive to provide equality in learning opportunities when designing instruction including technology.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2008

Marilyn P. Rice, Daphne Johnson, Bobby Ezell and Michelle Pierczynski‐Ward

Planning is a critical step in the process toward quality instruction and should also include consideration for what technology is appropriate for the lesson. Teacher…

Abstract

Purpose

Planning is a critical step in the process toward quality instruction and should also include consideration for what technology is appropriate for the lesson. Teacher educators must assist preservice teachers in learning this critical planning step of the instructional cycle. The purpose of this article is to present a step‐by‐step procedure to be used by preservice teachers when determining the appropriate use of technology in instruction.

Design/methodology/approach

Various strategies have been used by teacher educators to facilitate preservice teachers’ learning how to integrate technology. Some of these strategies are the modeling of technology integration by university instructors, the exposure to the use of technology in the classrooms during field experience, and including technology into the curriculum. In spite of these efforts, there is evidence that some teacher educators feel that preservice teachers are still not convinced of the value of integrating technology in their lessons. This article suggests that perhaps preservice teachers are still reluctant about the benefit of integrating technology because they have not been given a process for deciding which form(s) of technology should be used for what kind of instruction.

Findings

Included are charts with detailed descriptions, providing a step‐by‐step process for integrating technology into instruction. These charts demonstrate that the decision about what technology to use in a lesson is first based upon the needs of the learners and the material being taught.

Originality/value

This process demonstrates that technology is transparent: curriculum and the needs of learners drive the choice of technology, instead of technology being used just for technology sake.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 6 February 2013

Christa L. Wilkin, Cristina Rubino, Deone Zell and Lois M. Shelton

Technology is transforming teaching in ways that break down classroom walls while improving course quality and capitalizing on educators’ creativity. Rather than using…

Abstract

Technology is transforming teaching in ways that break down classroom walls while improving course quality and capitalizing on educators’ creativity. Rather than using technology in an ad hoc way, technology needs to fit the content and pedagogical style of the teacher.Our chapter builds on the extant literature on the necessary knowledge to integrate content, pedagogy, and technology (TPACK) in the classroom. We propose a comprehensive model that outlines the factors that lead to the development of TPACK, the relationship between TPACK and the use of technology, and outcomes gleaned from technology-enhanced learning.Our proposed model is an important first step to considering the precursors and outcomes of TPACK, which will need to be validated empirically. We extend the TPACK framework by identifying the predictors of TPACK such as teacher self-efficacy, experience with technology, and student factors. We argue that the extent to which educators develop their TPACK and use technology is bound by contextual factors such as organizational culture, resources, and student characteristics. Without considering the extensions that are identified in the Technology Integration Model, the linkages between TPACK and desirable outcomes (e.g., student engagement) are unclear. As a result, our proposed model has implications for educators and institutions alike.

Details

Increasing Student Engagement and Retention Using Classroom Technologies: Classroom Response Systems and Mediated Discourse Technologies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-512-8

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Book part
Publication date: 13 January 2011

Larysa Nadolny

The Teachers and Technology CONNECT website was created to connect K-12 teacher candidates with current classroom teachers. This website utilizes social media software and…

Abstract

The Teachers and Technology CONNECT website was created to connect K-12 teacher candidates with current classroom teachers. This website utilizes social media software and web 2.0 tools in a collaborative and supportive learning community. University teacher education students complete course activities using this website, including creating a video lesson plan. These videos are requested by participating classroom teachers and reflect best practices in using technology in the classroom. This successful project benefits both participating students and teachers, as well posted online for viewing by teachers around the world.

Details

Educating Educators with Social Media
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-649-3

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2011

Kyong eun Oh and Jacek Gwizdka

This study seeks to explore technology use in a higher education classroom with the focus on tablet computers.

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to explore technology use in a higher education classroom with the focus on tablet computers.

Design/methodology/approach

Study participants consisted of 36 undergraduate students from Rutgers University's Information Technology and Informatics major. Data were collected using an online survey, a classroom observation, and a group interview.

Findings

The study findings demonstrate unexpected technology uses that can be explained by the characteristics of the student group, the Net generation, namely, their impatient multi‐tasking and opportunistic behaviour. Students used tablet computers to take notes, conduct group activities and interact with the instructor. Students’ preference for typing was found to be a barrier in their adoption of tablet computers.

Research limitations/implications

The findings can help technology developers and educators better understand and optimize their use of computing technology in higher education. Limitations of this study include only one class was studied, and classroom observation probed student behaviors only at selected points in time.

Originality/value

The unique value of the study included: the study was not limited to tablet technology and investigated students’ use of multiple technologies; the study captured student behaviors in an actual learning environment, and the study provides empirical evidence for students’ multi‐tasking in a classroom and for their use of tablet computers for hand writing.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

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