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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Katerina Mavrou

This paper aims to briefly describe the experiences from the design, development and implementation of a(n) (assistive) technology course in a postgraduate programme for a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to briefly describe the experiences from the design, development and implementation of a(n) (assistive) technology course in a postgraduate programme for a Master's in special/inclusive education.

Design/methodology/approach

Data presented in the paper are collected documents' study, and specifically from students' assignments and final exams, with the consent of the students involved. Considerations and thoughts of the paper are based on students' work, feedback and expectations as well as the expectations of the university with respect to the programme's aims.

Findings

Findings of this review suggest that, even though the programme described does not yet have a long history in inclusive technology, it offers the potential for considerable benefits for the change in the state of mind of postgraduate students in relation to technology and disability. Theoretical background is vital in order to re‐form students' thinking, but at the same time, it seems that there is a need to provide students with opportunities to apply their knowledge in real settings, with responsibilities for technology applications for all learners.

Originality/value

The paper offers an important insight into the considerations and progress in designing a new course related to technology and disability with an emphasis on inclusive education and not technology per se.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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Book part
Publication date: 4 October 2012

Holly Buckland Parker

Larger numbers of students are entering higher education with more diverse learning needs. While laws are in place to create equal access to education for all…

Abstract

Larger numbers of students are entering higher education with more diverse learning needs. While laws are in place to create equal access to education for all, government-mandated learning supports for students with documented disabilities vary significantly from K-12 education to higher education. Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is a course design framework based on Universal Design in architecture, neuroscience research, and the latest technology, to design learning environments and curriculums that are accessible to all students in every learning environment. This chapter reviews literature on the history of Universal Design concepts, starting with Universal Design in architecture and moving into UDL. A review of the learning preferences of Millennial students, along with the neuroscience of learning and its connection to the principles of UDL, is also included in the literature review. This chapter also includes a section on Dr. Buckland Parker's study which documents four faculty members who chose to work with a small team of faculty development specialists to redesign their large enrollment courses using the principles of Universal Design for Learning.

Details

Transforming Learning Environments: Strategies to Shape the Next Generation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-015-4

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Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2021

Nathan Whitley-Grassi, Bryan J. Whitley-Grassi, Shaun C. Hoppel and Melissa Zgliczynski

In this chapter, the authors examine the challenges presented by supporting higher education students with disabilities in an online learning environment and put forth a…

Abstract

In this chapter, the authors examine the challenges presented by supporting higher education students with disabilities in an online learning environment and put forth a discussion and recommendations for delivering literacy supports to geographically disparate students in fully online courses by embracing the social model of disability and universal design principals as opposed to the typical medical model of disability that it pervasive in educational systems. Under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, educational institutions are required to promote auxiliary aids and services. Broadly defined, these aids are meant to enhance communication, inclusion, and participation of people with disabilities. The discussion of the resources put forth in this chapter begins with an exploration of the evolving consensus on the nature of disability and the standard (medical) model for providing accommodations and supports for students with disabilities, which was developed before the rise of online and blended learning environments. Next, the authors explore the problems inherent in the use of the medical model and highlight how the social model and universal design for learning can be utilized to empower learners and enhance their learning experiences in online and blended learning environments. The discussion returns to the importance of inclusion, participation, and engagement for students with disabilities no matter the modality of learning. This chapter concludes with a comparison of two models of support and recommended changes for implementation of best practices to enhance literacy supports in online learning environments.

Details

International Perspectives on Supporting and Engaging Online Learners
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-485-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Sheryl Burgstahler

Federal legislation and increasing support for the full inclusion of all students in precollege education have resulted in higher expectations and increased participation…

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Abstract

Federal legislation and increasing support for the full inclusion of all students in precollege education have resulted in higher expectations and increased participation of students with disabilities in academic programs that have prepared them for college studies. As a result, greater numbers of people with disabilities are attending postsecondary academic institutions and participating in distance learning offerings. This article focuses on the role that libraries can play in assuring that all distance learning students and instructors have access to the electronic resources they offer. It can be used to help libraries develop policies, guidelines, and procedures for making their electronic resources accessible to people with disabilities.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2015

Linda Chmiliar and Carrie Anton

– The purpose of this paper is to present the viewpoint of the authors on the use of the iPad as an assistive technology tool for post-secondary students with disabilities.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the viewpoint of the authors on the use of the iPad as an assistive technology tool for post-secondary students with disabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

Although this paper is not classified as a research article, the viewpoints discussed by the authors are related to a pilot study and continuing case study research they are conducting.

Findings

The authors indicate that they have been surprised at the positive results they have observed in the iPad implementation, particularly with students moving to the iPad to continue their studies at the completion of the research.

Practical implications

This paper discusses the opportunities and limitations afforded by the use of the iPad with post-secondary students as well as suggestions for implementation.

Social implications

After decades of experience in the field of assistive technology, the authors are becoming convinced that the iPad offers significant opportunities for learning for students with disabilities. One of the exciting parts of being involved in these iPad studies has been to observe: the transformation of student study skills, the increased student self-discovery around how they learn, and the increase in student confidence in technology use. Perhaps rather than labeling the iPad as a mobile device or an assistive technology tool, the authors need to look at different terminology to define it. The ownership of this device by post-secondary students is growing every year, and it is a device that does not set students with disabilities apart from their peers. It is a device that can effectively support student learning through built in accessibility features and the use of commonly available and used apps. Perhaps using the term “equalizing technology” to describe the iPad might be more appropriate.

Originality/value

This paper discusses the opportunities and limitations afforded by the use of the iPad with post-secondary students as well as suggestions for implementation. This is a rapidly developing area in universities and colleges around the world.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2015

Anne Guptill

This chapter discusses a bottom-up design strategy to support the principles of Universal Design and Universal Design for Learning adapted for online course development…

Abstract

This chapter discusses a bottom-up design strategy to support the principles of Universal Design and Universal Design for Learning adapted for online course development. The concept of Universal Design demands a holistic, bottom-up instructional design model for online course development that integrates technology, accessibility, recent instructional and learning theories, and a participatory postmodern worldview. This study is intended for faculty, instructional designers, administrators, assistive technology staff, and Web multimedia software vendors associated with higher education. The research assists these target audiences to design and develop online courses that are accessible without special adaptation or modification. The components of Universal Design for online learning support newer emergent approaches to instructional design, various programming solutions used in the software engineering field for efficiency, Universal Design for Learning, and legal guidelines associated with accessibility.

Details

Accessible Instructional Design
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-288-7

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Gerd Berget

On a world basis, 15% of the population has a disability. Having a disability can result in a higher frequency of health-related information needs than other users might…

Abstract

On a world basis, 15% of the population has a disability. Having a disability can result in a higher frequency of health-related information needs than other users might experience. The Web represents a widely used source for health information. People with disabilities, however, often encounter barriers during online searching, such as inaccessible information, poorly designed search user interfaces and lack of compatibility with assistive technology. Consequently, many users are potentially excluded from a range of information sources. Measures are therefore needed to remove these barriers to avoid health disparities that can result from unequal access to information. Public libraries have a social responsibility to include all user groups, and should aspire to make fully accessible services. A good tool in this context is the implementation of the universal design mind-set, where the purpose is to develop services that are available to all people. This chapter discusses how universal design can be a premise for equal access to health information and potentially reduce health disparities in the context of users with disabilities. Both library services and education of librarians will be addressed.

Details

Roles and Responsibilities of Libraries in Increasing Consumer Health Literacy and Reducing Health Disparities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-341-8

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Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2015

Axel Schmetzke

The author takes a comprehensive look at the accessibility of e-resources for all people, including those with disabilities, in the context of collection development (CD).

Abstract

Purpose

The author takes a comprehensive look at the accessibility of e-resources for all people, including those with disabilities, in the context of collection development (CD).

Methodology/approach

Employing a combination of research methodologies policy analysis, content analysis, and phone survey—the author explores the extent to which the needs of people with disabilities are considered.

Findings

Several professional library organizations recommend accessibility-sensitive selection and procurement procedures. However, not all students enrolled in library school programs might learn about the issue. Few books on the subject cover the issue adequately. Nationwide, CD policies requiring conformance to accessibility standards are the exception; and when librarians meet to make decisions about the selection of specific e-resources, the needs of people with disabilities are rarely on their radar screens.

Research limitations/implications

Researchers conducting similar surveys in the future might want to not only select a statistically more representative sample of academic libraries but also widen their focus and include both accessibility and usability in their investigations.

Practical implications

Textbook authors and course instructors in the area of CD need to address accessibility and usability. Librarians need to raise the issue with database and e-book vendors during license negotiations.

Social implications

The acquisition of e-resources designed to be accessible and usable for all will enable people with disabilities to participate more fully in our information-driven society.

Originality/value

The data collected provide for a broad discussion of the extent to which the needs of people with disabilities are considered in connection with CD.

Details

Accessibility for Persons with Disabilities and the Inclusive Future of Libraries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-652-6

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2018

Batoul Khalifa, Ramzi Nasser and Haitham Alkhateeb

The purpose of this paper is to assess student perceptions of their engagement in tangible and intangible higher education services using the College Student Experiences…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess student perceptions of their engagement in tangible and intangible higher education services using the College Student Experiences Questionnaire (CSEQ).

Design/methodology/approach

The research draws on a random sample of students without disabilities and all students with disabilities in a public university in Qatar. Group comparison analysis is conducted to find differences between the two groups by adapting the CSEQ to assess student perceptions of engagement with the services.

Findings

The findings showed that students with disabilities were less satisfied with intangible services in learning systems. Students with and without disabilities felt that the campus facilities were below average; students with disabilities rated university services lower than students without. All students felt that the learning systems were above average, with higher ratings among students without disability.

Social implications

Considerable work needs to be done in capacity and professional development with faculty to deal with learning and teaching methods with students with disabilities.

Originality/value

In general, this study compares students with disabilities with non-disabilities. Both groups confront barriers to access learning and to the assessment of their learning. They both were satisfied with services but with higher perceptions of engagement among those with non-disabilities. Higher education institutions must consider those services in unison to both groups treating both equally, recognizing that a discourse of differences may pit one group over another in infrastructure and the institutional services provided.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Evangeline Marlos Varonis

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the principles of universal design can be implemented by faculty and course designers to help give all learners access to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the principles of universal design can be implemented by faculty and course designers to help give all learners access to equivalent information. It describes how information communication technologies can create barriers to information access, particularly when course content is rich in multimedia, but also how such technologies can be utilized to creates bridges to accessible content through designing for accessibility from the outset.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper offers a brief review of current international guidelines and US legislation related to information communication technologies in higher education. It documents the challenge of meeting these best practices and legal mandates, as evidenced by recent legal cases in the USA resulting from inaccessible course content in higher education. Finally, it describes how universal design can enhance accessibility for individuals with visual, hearing, motor, and cognitive impairments and provides concrete suggestions for making content more accessible to all learners, not just those with disabilities.

Findings

Given the challenges of creating accessible content that provides equivalent information to all learners, faculty and course designers can implement the principles of Universal Design to enhance the learning environment for all students and ensure they are in compliance with guidelines and regulations. Such compliance is facilitated by emerging standards for accessible content and emerging technologies for making content accessible to all without the need for special accommodations.

Originality/value

This paper focusses on concrete approaches to achieving accessibility in higher education, a matter of increasing concern for moral reasons (it is the right thing to do) and for legal reasons given recent lawsuits.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

Keywords

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