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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Walfried M. Lassar, Chris Manolis and Robert D. Winsor

Examines the effects of service quality on customer satisfaction from two distinct methodological perspectives. Specifically, a study utilizing a sample of international…

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11014

Abstract

Examines the effects of service quality on customer satisfaction from two distinct methodological perspectives. Specifically, a study utilizing a sample of international private banking customers is conducted wherein service quality is operationalized via two distinct and well‐known measures – SERVQUAL and Technical/Functional Quality. These two service quality measures are subsequently compared and contrasted as to their ability to predict customer satisfaction. To further assess the validity of these findings, two moderators of the service‐quality/customer‐satisfaction relationship are introduced and evaluated. Finally, this research examines the potential utility of employing separate measures for customer satisfaction from the perspectives of both technical and functional aspects of the service delivery process. Overall, our findings are of importance to service managers as they strive to identify efficient and effective approaches for improving quality. The paper explores the theoretical and practical insights of the findings, including potential strengths and limitations of current service quality models with regard to their ability to define and explain the quality/satisfaction relationship.

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Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2021

Neeraj Kumar, Pooja Choudhary, Anees Ahmad, Swapnarag Swain and Pankaj Kumar Singh

The purpose of this study is to identify the factors affecting the quality of technical education in a developing nation, India.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify the factors affecting the quality of technical education in a developing nation, India.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were 465 students and 310 faculty members who were randomly chosen from a total of 31 institutions/colleges/universities providing engineering education in Punjab state of India. The factor structures were obtained by applying factor analysis.

Findings

The result of this research reveals ten factors determining the quality of technical education, such as teaching practices, infrastructural facilities, industry–institute linkage, faculty's qualification, reputation of the institute, procedural simplification, administrative staff services, access and equity, financial burden of the course and work culture. Moreover, the research results also reveal eight factors affecting the quality of technical education, namely, institutional standards, institutional support, teaching environment, teaching practices, performance-linked promotion, work culture, academic freedom and administrative services in this order of preference are essential for the delivery of quality in technical education.

Originality/value

This study is the first attempt to examine the factor structure of technical education quality from both the perspectives of students and faculty. The implications of this study are expected to help the management of technical education institutes, regulatory agencies and the government in devising strategies to enhance the quality of technical education in India.

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Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2013

Anil R. Sahu, Rashmi R. Shrivastava and R.L. Shrivastava

The purpose of this paper is to identify critical factors of total quality management (TQM), for use in a possible framework that addresses sustainable quality

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1383

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify critical factors of total quality management (TQM), for use in a possible framework that addresses sustainable quality improvements in technical institutes as a plausible means of TQM implementation in higher education programs.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature survey of the TQM and related quality methodologies and content analysis of TQM literature in technical institutes provide the theoretical and practical background for this work. The content analysis was carried out following the standard principles of deductive reasoning and subsequently, relevant factors were identified for implementations.

Findings

Unlike the scenario in industry, TQM philosophies have to be adopted differently for a successful implementation in technical institutes. The identified critical factors of TQM and related quality improvement methodologies provide a comprehensive guideline for an effective and efficient implementation of TQM in technical institutes.

Originality/value

This paper identifies the critical factors of quality improvement initiatives that are most comprehensive and have potential to address the quality issues of technical institutes. The critical factors identified in this study, offer a practical guidance for academics to implement TQM in technical institutes and can form the basis for delineating a mathematical model for these institutes.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Gi‐Du Kang

To extend understanding of service quality by empirically examining the conceptualisation of service quality (both technical and functional).

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11059

Abstract

Purpose

To extend understanding of service quality by empirically examining the conceptualisation of service quality (both technical and functional).

Design/methodology/approach

Because the popular service‐quality instrument, SERVQUAL, concentrates on functional quality, a model incorporating both technical quality and functional quality is employed here. Structural equation modeling (SEM) is utilised to examine empirically a two‐components model of service quality.

Findings

A two‐component model yields better fit than a model concentrating on functional quality alone (such as SERVQUAL).

Research limitations/implications

Because the present study tests the model using a single service industry, an exhaustive description of technical quality could not be provided. This could be overcome in future studies by employing multiple service industries.

Practical implications

A useful foundation whereby practitioners can appreciate the importance of technical service quality (in addition to functional quality).

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified information and resources need, and offers practical assistance to academics and practitioners in the field.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Ronald James Ferguson, Michèle Paulin, Charles Pigeassou and Romain Gauduchon

This study assessed the technical (tangible) and functional (human interaction) quality of services in a first‐class international health resort and related these to…

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2584

Abstract

This study assessed the technical (tangible) and functional (human interaction) quality of services in a first‐class international health resort and related these to service management effectiveness. Service management is effective when customers judge the overall service quality to be good, they are highly satisfied, they are willing to recommend the firm to others and they intend to re‐purchase or are predisposed to purchase additional services from the firm. The technical and functional aspects of services quality and their relation to service management effectiveness, were found to be different between the core and supplementary services, between customers and service personnel and between customers with and without experience. The results support the statement that competitive advantage in this industry can be obtained by improving the functional aspects of services management, by better performance of supplementary services and by reducing the gap in perceptions between customers and contact personnel.

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Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Banwari Mittal and Walfried M. Lassar

One of the most unexamined assumptions marketing firms have made in recent years is that satisfaction alone will guarantee customer loyalty. Our research questions this…

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16742

Abstract

One of the most unexamined assumptions marketing firms have made in recent years is that satisfaction alone will guarantee customer loyalty. Our research questions this assumption. We explored the correspondence between customer satisfaction and loyalty, and found as many as half of the “satisfied” customers to be predisposed to switching service suppliers. This satisfaction‐loyalty gap reflects the fact that different components of service quality drive satisfaction versus loyalty. Satisfaction is driven more by “technical quality” (the quality of the work performed) than by “functional quality” (how the service work was delivered); however, once satisfaction is achieved, loyalty is driven more by functional than by technical quality. This is the pattern of influence for a “low contact” (where customers’ direct contact with service providers is absent or marginal) service. For a “high contact” service, the pattern of influence is exactly the reverse. Of significant importance to service managers, the paper explains the dynamics of loyalty versus satisfaction and derives their managerial implications.

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Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Gi‐Du Kang and Jeffrey James

Service quality researchers to date have paid scant attention to the issue of the dimensions of service quality. Much of the earlier work accepted the content measured by…

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34796

Abstract

Service quality researchers to date have paid scant attention to the issue of the dimensions of service quality. Much of the earlier work accepted the content measured by the SERVQUAL instrument. Following the argument that SERVQUAL only reflects the service delivery process, the study empirically examines the European perspective (i.e. Grönroos' model) suggesting that service quality consists of three dimensions, technical, functional and image, and that image functions as a filter in service quality perception. The results from a cell phone service sample revealed that Grönroos' model is a more appropriate representation of service quality than the American perspective with its limited concentration on the dimension of functional quality.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Victor Gambhir, N C Wadhwa and Sandeep Grover

The paper aims to discuss current Technical Education scenarios in India. It proposes modelling the factors affecting quality in a technical institute and then applying a…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to discuss current Technical Education scenarios in India. It proposes modelling the factors affecting quality in a technical institute and then applying a suitable technique for assessment, comparison and ranking.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper chose graph theoretic approach for quantification of quality-enabled model. Further, the paper has validated the approach by taking examples of institutions and applying the methodology.

Findings

The paper provides a systematic methodology to build a quality model for quantification of various factors in a technical institute. The qualitative effect represented in form of a single numerical index is a novel method for such representations. The illustrated methodology in the paper is equally useful for comparison and ranking of a set of institutes.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the chosen factors in the approach, the methodology may not be equally suitable based on type and size of institute and the geographical location.

Practical implications

The paper includes demonstration on application of methodology for comparing the quality in a quantitative manner. The dynamic model allows changing factors and/or their effects as per requirement.

Social implications

In future, the methodology can be taken up by government/regulatory bodies and can convey the comparisons of institutions to stakeholders including students and parents.

Originality/value

This paper attempts to develop a novel method for comparing quality that can be used by accreditation bodies.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 1998

Kung‐Jen Tu and Vivian Loftness

Despite discussions about the universal work station, there is increasing workplace dynamics in US organisations. These dynamics include space configuration changes, space…

Abstract

Despite discussions about the universal work station, there is increasing workplace dynamics in US organisations. These dynamics include space configuration changes, space enclosure changes, changes in occupant density and increasing equipment density. At the same time, building infrastructures have not evolved to meet these demands, with little flexibility in the heating, ventilation and air‐conditioning (HVAC), lighting, or electrical/telecommunication systems of new or existing office buildings. This paper examines the effects of organisational workplace dynamics and building infrastructure flexibility on the environmental and technical quality of offices. Resulting from extensive field studies in US buildings, the authors contend that there are numerous statistically significant issues for the design and management of buildings for the dynamic organisation. The study identified numerous factors that affect thermal, air, lighting and technical quality in offices. In relation to infrastructure, for example, occupants who work in office areas provided with greater cooling capacity and more supply air volume, and combined with smaller HVAC zones, appeared to have higher levels of thermal satisfaction. Those who work in areas with higher outlet densities gave higher technical quality ratings; and those provided with relocatable outlets (raised floor and furniture based) gave significantly higher technical satisfaction ratings than those provided with least‐first‐cost ‘tombstones’. In relation to organisational dynamics, increasing occupant densities in existing buildings are related to more thermal and air quality complaints, more complaints about outlet accessibility, as well as more complaints about inadequate light levels on work surfaces. This paper will outline the major findings of a study linking organisational dynamics with building infrastructure, moving towards the definition of innovations in facility design that will more effectively support dynamic organisations.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2011

Sandy Ng, Meredith E. David and Tracey S. Dagger

This paper seeks to investigate the effects of relationship benefits on relationship quality and aspects of service quality, namely technical and functional quality, and…

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10613

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to investigate the effects of relationship benefits on relationship quality and aspects of service quality, namely technical and functional quality, and the subsequent influence on word‐of‐mouth behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports results from a structural equation model that utilizes data from 591 consumers across a range of services.

Findings

The findings highlight the important role of relationship benefits in driving customer perceptions of technical, functional and relationship quality. While confidence, social and special treatment benefits drive technical and functional quality, it is only confidence benefits that drive relationship quality. Furthermore, it is found that functional and relationship quality drive word‐of‐mouth behavior.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this study contribute to the literature by showing the differential impact that relationship benefits have on qualitytechnical, functional, and relationship – and subsequently the effect that functional and relationship quality have on word‐of‐mouth behavior.

Practical implications

The paper provides firms with the knowledge needed to more effectively implement relationship‐marketing activities. As the service economy continues to grow, competition intensifies, and to ensure service excellence, firms need to establish strong relationships with their customers as the quality of the customer‐provider relationship can increase word‐of‐mouth behavior.

Originality/value

The paper empirically investigates the role of relationship benefits in enhancing perceptions of quality while also providing an analysis of the differential role of functional, technical, and relationship quality in enhancing customers' word‐of‐mouth intentions.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

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