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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2021

Iris A.G.M. Geerts, Joyce J.P.A. Bierbooms and Stefan W.M.G. Cloudt

This two-part study aims to contribute to the body of knowledge on team development by examining the development of self-managing teams (SMTs) in healthcare. Based on an…

Abstract

Purpose

This two-part study aims to contribute to the body of knowledge on team development by examining the development of self-managing teams (SMTs) in healthcare. Based on an exploration of the team development literature, a perspective on SMT development was created, which suggested that SMTs develop along a non-sequential pattern of three processes–team management, task management and boundary management and improvement–that is largely the result of individual, team, organizational and environmental-level factors.

Design/methodology/approach

The perspective on SMT development was assessed in a Dutch mental healthcare organization by conducting 13 observations of primary mental healthcare SMTs as well as 14 retrospective interviews with the self-management process facilitator and advisors of all 100 primary mental healthcare SMTs.

Findings

Empirical results supported the perspective on SMT development. SMTs were found to develop along each of the three defined processes in a variety or possible patterns or simultaneously over time, depending on many of the identified factors and three others. These factors included individual human capital, team member attitudes and perceived workload at the individual level, psychological safety, team turnover, team size, nature of the task and bureaucratic history at the team level, and management style and material and social support at the organizational level.

Practical implications

This study provides a non-sequential model of SMT development in healthcare, which healthcare providers could use to understand and foster SMTs development. To foster SMT development, it is suggested that cultural change need to be secured alongside with structural change.

Originality/value

Even though various team development models have been described in the literature, this study is the first to indicate how SMTs in the healthcare context develop toward effective functioning.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 35 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Book part
Publication date: 4 August 2017

Stephen M. Fiore and Eleni Georganta

In a variety of domains, teams represent the main mechanism for dealing with change, complexity, and uncertainty in organizations. Consequently, teams need to be able to…

Abstract

Purpose

In a variety of domains, teams represent the main mechanism for dealing with change, complexity, and uncertainty in organizations. Consequently, teams need to be able to adapt and effectively use shared and complementary cognitive processing while collaborating to deal with these challenges.

Methodology/approach

A conceptual review is provided that addresses this type of complex collaborative cognition via discussion of macrocognition and the processes contributing to effective team problem-solving.

Findings

Despite extensive research on problem-solving, research and theories regarding how problem-solving changes over time as teams develop is missing. With this review, we extend research on team problem-solving and team development through integration of existing theory and concepts from the team literature.

Social implications

This review provides a theoretical foundation for understanding and studying the developmental dynamic of team problem-solving.

Originality/value

A team problem-solving development model is described which outlines the degree to which the primary elements of team development are likely to affect macrocognitive processes within problem-solving phases. A set of propositions is offered in order to guide research on team development in collaborative problem-solving.

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Book part
Publication date: 8 April 2005

Fredrik von Corswant

This paper deals with the organizing of interactive product development. Developing products in interaction between firms may provide benefits in terms of specialization…

Abstract

This paper deals with the organizing of interactive product development. Developing products in interaction between firms may provide benefits in terms of specialization, increased innovation, and possibilities to perform development activities in parallel. However, the differentiation of product development among a number of firms also implies that various dependencies need to be dealt with across firm boundaries. How dependencies may be dealt with across firms is related to how product development is organized. The purpose of the paper is to explore dependencies and how interactive product development may be organized with regard to these dependencies.

The analytical framework is based on the industrial network approach, and deals with the development of products in terms of adaptation and combination of heterogeneous resources. There are dependencies between resources, that is, they are embedded, implying that no resource can be developed in isolation. The characteristics of and dependencies related to four main categories of resources (products, production facilities, business units and business relationships) provide a basis for analyzing the organizing of interactive product development.

Three in-depth case studies are used to explore the organizing of interactive product development with regard to dependencies. The first two cases are based on the development of the electrical system and the seats for Volvo’s large car platform (P2), performed in interaction with Delphi and Lear respectively. The third case is based on the interaction between Scania and Dayco/DFC Tech for the development of various pipes and hoses for a new truck model.

The analysis is focused on what different dependencies the firms considered and dealt with, and how product development was organized with regard to these dependencies. It is concluded that there is a complex and dynamic pattern of dependencies that reaches far beyond the developed product as well as beyond individual business units. To deal with these dependencies, development may be organized in teams where several business units are represented. This enables interaction between different business units’ resource collections, which is important for resource adaptation as well as for innovation. The delimiting and relating functions of the team boundary are elaborated upon and it is argued that also teams may be regarded as actors. It is also concluded that a modular product structure may entail a modular organization with regard to the teams, though, interaction between business units and teams is needed. A strong connection between the technical structure and the organizational structure is identified and it is concluded that policies regarding the technical structure (e.g. concerning “carry-over”) cannot be separated from the management of the organizational structure (e.g. the supplier structure). The organizing of product development is in itself a complex and dynamic task that needs to be subject to interaction between business units.

Details

Managing Product Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-311-2

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Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2009

D. Scott DeRue and Brent D. Rosso

Team creativity presents an interesting dilemma. On one hand, organizational teams are increasingly being asked to produce creative outcomes rapidly and within tight…

Abstract

Team creativity presents an interesting dilemma. On one hand, organizational teams are increasingly being asked to produce creative outcomes rapidly and within tight timelines. On the other hand, teams need sufficient time to explore different perspectives, play with ideas, and overcome the process losses that occur from working in interdependent groups. In this chapter, we address this dilemma by developing a model for understanding how teams can maximize the speed of the team creative process. We propose that teams' potential for rapid creativity is a function of aligning the team structure and standardization of the creative process with the team development cycle. When these three elements are aligned, teams are more likely to generate creative outcomes in a rapid manner.

Details

Creativity in Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-583-3

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2007

Rod Gapp and Ron Fisher

The paper seeks to demonstrate an intrapreneur‐led three‐phase model of innovation based on understanding the relationships between service delivery and product development

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4899

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to demonstrate an intrapreneur‐led three‐phase model of innovation based on understanding the relationships between service delivery and product development thought, and the application of intrapreneurial‐focused teams in the healthcare and manufacturing industries.

Design/methodology/approach

The research proposes a model that starts with effective teambuilding within an intrapreneurial context, then encompasses the relationship between service and product as a platform for the development of more effective innovation. A two‐part qualitative case study provides insight and understanding of the model's application within both service and manufacturing environments.

Findings

Investigating service delivery shortfalls with effectively developed intrapreneurial teams leads to new and/or improved services. New service developments in turn lead to the development of new products. An action research model based on Deming's PDSA (plan, do, study, act) cycle determines the point of departure for each stage of innovation. The PDSA cycle provides a method for combining innovation, knowledge development and management.

Practical implications

Current approaches focus on the characteristics of intrapreneurs rather than on the linked activities that lead to successful product/service innovation. Important issues such as how teams progress through the stages of service and product development are not usually considered. As a consequence, there is little in the extant literature to guide prospective intrapreneurs or organisations.

Originality/value

Little research has been conducted into how intrapreneurship occurs in organisations. This paper provides insight into how intrapreneurship functions through new service and new product innovations in both the service and manufacturing sectors.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2011

Anne Koch

Previous literature notes that more remains to be understood about the relationship between organizational knowledge and innovation. In this article the author seeks to

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2769

Abstract

Purpose

Previous literature notes that more remains to be understood about the relationship between organizational knowledge and innovation. In this article the author seeks to argue that innovation depends on efficient knowledge integration, while the latter depends on factors internal and external to product development teams.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper proposes a conceptual framework that takes into account firm‐internal knowledge integration of human and technological assets. In particular, the author analyzes and discusses knowledge integration mechanisms which a firm strategically deploys in the innovation process.

Findings

Knowledge‐relatedness, the extent to which product development teams are specialized in related scientific or technological fields, is proposed as an important moderator for the relationship between operating routines and innovative performance. If many product development teams perform well, innovative firm performance will increase.

Research limitations/implications

The author notes the need for empirical inquiry which can build on the theoretical model. Other possible moderators, such as the physical proximity of knowledge‐related product development teams and the frequency of knowledge‐related personnel transfer from one product development team to another, would be interesting avenues for further research.

Practical implications

Specifying operating routines with respect to integrating functional and technological knowledge can result in innovative firm performance.

Originality/value

The article adds to the knowledge‐based view of the firm while analyzing how a firm can make use of its heterogeneous knowledge for innovation. The author shows how knowledge‐relatedness moderates the relationship between operating routines for new product development teams and innovative performance.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Jakob Trischler, Simon J. Pervan and Donald Robert Scott

Many firms use customer co-creation practices with the aim of benefiting from their customers’ knowledge, skills and resources. This paper aims to explore co-creation…

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1829

Abstract

Purpose

Many firms use customer co-creation practices with the aim of benefiting from their customers’ knowledge, skills and resources. This paper aims to explore co-creation processes which involve users with different background characteristics and motivational drivers.

Design/methodology/approach

The study builds on an analysis of data from six teams in which users collaborated with in-house professionals for the development of new service concepts. Observations and open-ended questionnaires provided insights into the teamsdevelopment processes. Independent experts rated the generated concepts. The data were analysed using cross-comparison matrices.

Findings

The findings suggest that the co-creation process and outcomes can be influenced by numerous intra-team factors, including relationship and task conflicts, participation style, team bonding, team identity and cohesiveness and intra-team collaboration. Their occurrence and influence seem to be linked with a specific team composition. A conceptual co-creation process model and six propositions are used to describe the complex relationships between team composition, intra-team factors and key innovation outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

Research that investigates user involvement in teams needs to consider the complexity of intra-team factors affecting the development process and outcomes. The findings are limited to a specific setting, design task and user sample. Future research should replicate this study in different sectors.

Practical implications

Key to customer co-creation is the systematic recruitment of users based on their background characteristics and motivational drivers. For instance, the involvement of users with very specific innovation-related benefit expectations can cause conflict, leading to narrowly focused outcomes. This, however, can be mitigated by the form of facilitation and roles adopted by in-house professionals. Understanding intra-team dynamics can allow the firm to assemble and facilitate customer co-creation so that generated outcomes can align with set innovation targets.

Originality/value

This paper provides original insights into the “black box” of the customer co-creation process and the complex relationship between team composition, intra-team factors and key innovation outcomes.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

A.G. Sheard and A.P. Kakabadse

This monograph summarises the key influences of leadership behaviour on the transformation process associated with creation of an effective and high performing team. It…

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17374

Abstract

This monograph summarises the key influences of leadership behaviour on the transformation process associated with creation of an effective and high performing team. It clarifies the key factors that are relevant to a team at each stage of the transformation process and the leadership roles that each team member can play. The role of an organisation's senior management is considered both in terms of the impact it has on the transformation process within specific teams and in terms of creating the necessary organisational environment to make effective teams the norm. Some reasons why senior management behaviour is often perceived as inconsistent and unhelpful are explored. Specific recommendations are made to help senior managers to adapt their behaviour, and in so doing become more context‐sensitive to the needs of the environment as it changes. Some tools and techniques are presented that have been found in practice to help senior managers adapt their behaviour to that most appropriate at a given time, and to create the organisational infrastructure needed to make effective teams the organisational norm rather than the exception. A case study is presented illustrating the networked nature of leadership and the culture change associated with making effective teams “the way we do things around here.”

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 February 2020

Jamie L. Guttenberg

The purpose of this study is to examine if there is a difference between service-sector Lean Six Sigma (LSS) project teams that progress through Tuckman’s group development

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1913

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine if there is a difference between service-sector Lean Six Sigma (LSS) project teams that progress through Tuckman’s group development model and those that do not in terms of the number of completed projects, the number of projects completed on time, the length of time to complete the projects and the total cost savings and avoidance because of the projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The research consisted of a quantitative, descriptive methodology. The design included a sample from a service-sector LSS practitioner population, a survey instrument, one independent construct with two levels, four dependent constructs and a multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA).

Findings

The progression of service-sector LSS teams through Tuckman’s group development model, as measured with the group process questionnaire, significantly influences the teams in terms of the number of completed projects, the number of projects completed on time, the length of time to complete the projects and the total cost savings and avoidance because of the projects.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of the study is there may be other factors not related to Tuckman’s group development model that can influence the outcomes of LSS projects. These variables may include senior executive buy-in, number of LSS practitioners in the organization, the robustness of LSS training programs, level of talent and other factors not related to Tuckman’s group development model. Another limitation of the study encompassed using a sample of convenience instead of a random sample.

Practical implications

The recommendation for practice is binate. First, service-sector LSS project teams should ensure they progress through the stages of Tuckman’s group development model to enjoy the significantly improved project outcomes. Second, LSS practitioners and trainers should ensure that Tuckman’s group development model is part of the training curriculum.

Social implications

The study demonstrates that all groups should attempt to progress through the stages of Tuckman and Jensen (2010) group development model to enjoy the benefits of working in a cohesive, task-focused team.

Originality/value

This study adds to the body of knowledge because, prior to this study, there was not prior research involving Tuckman’s group development model and LSS team outcomes.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Debasisha Mishra and Biswajit Mahanty

The purpose of this paper is to find good values of onsite-offshore team strength; number of hours of communication between business users and onsite team and between…

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1356

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to find good values of onsite-offshore team strength; number of hours of communication between business users and onsite team and between onsite and offshore team so as to reduce project cost and improve schedule in a global software development (GSD) environment for software development project.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs system dynamics simulation approach to study software project characteristics in both co-located and distributed development environments. The authors consulted 14 experts from Indian software outsourcing industry during our model construction and validation.

Findings

The study results show that there is a drop in overall team productivity in outsourcing environment by considering the offshore options. But the project cost can be reduced by employing the offshore team for coding and testing work only with minimal training for imparting business knowledge. The research results show that there is a potential to save project cost by being flexible in project schedule.

Research limitations/implications

The implication of the study is that the project management team should be careful not to keep high percentage of manpower at offshore location in distributed software environment. A large offshore team can increase project cost and schedule due to higher training overhead, lower productivity and higher error proneness. In GSD, the management effort should be to keep requirement analysis and design work at onsite location and involves the offshore team in coding and testing work.

Practical implications

The software project manager can use the model results to divide the software team between onsite and offshore location during various phases of software development in distributed environment.

Originality/value

The study is novel as there is little attempt at finding the team distribution between onsite and offshore location in GSD environment.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

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