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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Tom Bourner

Focuses on learning outcomes in debates on teaching methods in higher education (HE). Presents six core learning outcomes and ten common teaching methods for each of the…

Abstract

Focuses on learning outcomes in debates on teaching methods in higher education (HE). Presents six core learning outcomes and ten common teaching methods for each of the learning outcomes. Concludes that the search for any universally best teaching method is bound to be fruitless and should give way to the search for better ways of achieving particular learning outcomes. Recommends the widening of the repertoire of teaching methods available to academic staff as a means of diminishing the severity of the trade‐off between teaching effectiveness and teaching efficiency as the unit of teaching resource continues to fall.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 39 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Anne Morris

To review the provision of research methods teaching across UK institutions teaching accredited information and/or library science postgraduate programmes.

Abstract

Purpose

To review the provision of research methods teaching across UK institutions teaching accredited information and/or library science postgraduate programmes.

Design/methodology/approach

Content analysis of institutional web sites was undertaken followed by telephone interviews with research method tutors. Information was obtained on what, how and when research methods are taught, the type of coursework expected, the usage of virtual learning environments and discussion boards, the key texts, electronic sources, other teaching materials recommended to students and the emphasis placed on quantitative versus qualitative methods.

Findings

All institutions in the UK teach research methods on LIS‐accredited programmes. Research methods modules have different weighting, are taught in various formats, short and fat, long and thin, and cover a variety of topics. Some tutors place more emphasis on qualitative techniques than qualitative methods, while for others it is the other way around. Most stress the practical side of doing research. The use of virtual learning environments and discussion boards feature prominently in some institutions for the teaching of research methods.

Research implications

This research will provide impetus for some institutions to modify their research methods teaching provision.

Originality/value

The sharing of knowledge and innovative teaching practices for research methods.

Details

New Library World, vol. 107 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2020

Guilherme Luz Tortorella, Rogério Miorando, Diego Fettermann and Diego Tlapa Mendoza

This article identifies the association between two methods for teaching lean manufacturing (LM): problem-based learning (PBL) and classroom lectures, and students'…

Abstract

Purpose

This article identifies the association between two methods for teaching lean manufacturing (LM): problem-based learning (PBL) and classroom lectures, and students' learning styles of a postgraduate course.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from graduate students LM courses that present different teaching approaches. Thus, students' learning preferences were gathered through the application of the Index of Learning Style questionnaire, and their performance assessed after each course.

Findings

Results indicate that learning styles are indeed associated with LM teaching approaches, and comprehending interaction effects between learning style dimensions is essential for properly adapting the teaching method. However, these interactions have different extensions.

Originality/value

Although teaching LM has significantly evolved over the past decades, the single application of traditional teaching methods jeopardizes learning effectiveness of graduate students because of the practical nature of LM. This study provides evidence to better understand the effect of complementary teaching methods and their relationship with students' preferences, empirically examining that there is not one best approach for understanding LM.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 62 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Kavous Ardalan

To see how educational philosophies that underlie lecture and case methods of teaching are related to how faculty perform their teaching, research, and service.

Abstract

Purpose

To see how educational philosophies that underlie lecture and case methods of teaching are related to how faculty perform their teaching, research, and service.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on the premise that foundational philosophies, worldviews or paradigms underlie educational philosophies, and each educational philosophy favors a certain instructional methodology, which in turn implies a certain way or method of instruction.

Findings

The findings of this paper are that each educational philosophy favors a certain instructional methodology, which in turn determines not only the way that the instruction is performed but also how faculty perform their teaching, research, and service.

Research limitations/implications

This paper implies that differences between the underlying world views of lecture and case methods of teaching similarly lead to differences in many other aspects of the teaching and learning process.

Practical implications

This paper implies that, in practice, faculty would perform their teaching, research, and service in a more consistent manner if they become consciously aware of the underlying philosophy of their teaching method.

Originality/value

The original contribution of this paper is that it shows how in a systematic manner the differences in teaching philosophy lead to differences in what faculty do in all areas of their activities: teaching, research, and service.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Rekai Zenda

The purpose of this paper is to explore teaching methods that can allow learners to be creative and proactive. The learners should be able to solve problems, make…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore teaching methods that can allow learners to be creative and proactive. The learners should be able to solve problems, make decisions, think critically, communicate ideas effectively and work efficiently. Teaching and learning are evolving and developing in many countries, with a focus concerning what is actually learned through effective teaching methods.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research was carried out, identifying effective teaching methods and exploring their roles in teaching and learning in physical sciences in selected rural secondary schools. Face-to-face interviews with physical sciences teachers, school principals and curriculum advisers were used to collect data.

Findings

A range of teaching methods that may be integrated into teaching and learning activities is identified. The teaching methods ensure that topics are discussed and explored through interaction and sharing of perspective, views and values through which new learning can emerge. Viewed from this perspective, there is a need to create a stimulating, enriching, challenging and focused environment for physical sciences learners through the use of multiple teaching methodologies.

Research limitations/implications

The improvement of science learner’s academic achievement requires also the teachers to develop new skills and ways of teaching the subject. Improving learner academic achievement in physical sciences requires an approach to improve the skills of teachers as well, which focuses on the effective use of teaching methods such as experiments. This means attempting to change the attitude of teachers to regard the processes of teaching and learning as central to their role. In addition, the achievement of learners in science could possibly solve the problem of shortages of engineers, skilled artisans, technicians, doctors and technologists for sustainable development. It is important to create conducive conditions for learning and teaching in physical sciences, and continue to progressively and within available resources, realise that collaboration, problem-solving and hands-on activities are effective teaching methods to improve learner academic achievement.

Practical implications

The learners should be able to solve problems, make decisions, think critically, communicate ideas effectively and work efficiently. The study is limited to the teaching methods used in physical sciences. Hands-on activities are essential in science teaching and learning.

Social implications

The use of collaborations, peer teachings and hands-on activities allows learners emphasise the creation of a classroom where students are engaged in essentially open-ended, student-centred and hands-on experiments.

Originality/value

The paper is original work, in which face-to-face interviews were carried out. Qualitative research was carried out. The paper could assist educators in the teaching of physical sciences in secondary schools using the identified methods. The results were obtained from physical sciences educators, school principals and curriculum advisors in South Africa. Poor academic achievement in rural areas is a concern, and therefore, the paper provides effective methods which can be used by educators in the teaching of physical sciences in rural areas.

Details

Information and Learning Science, vol. 118 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Niall Piercy, Alistair Brandon‐Jones, Emma Brandon‐Jones and Colin Campbell

This paper aims to examine the preferences of students towards different teaching methods and the perceived effectiveness of experiential teaching methods in different…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the preferences of students towards different teaching methods and the perceived effectiveness of experiential teaching methods in different operations management (OM) modules.

Design/methodology/approach

Student perceptions of different teaching methods and various aspects of an experiential teaching method, in the form of a business simulation game, are examined using survey data from 274 respondents in four small post‐experience and two large pre‐experience OM modules.

Findings

The paper's analysis suggests that traditional and experiential teaching methods are both popular with OM students, whilst independent teaching methods are less well liked. Analysis also shows that students on both kinds of OM modules perceive most aspects of the experiential teaching method used in this study (The Operations Game) very positively.

Research limitations/implications

This research study was confined to a particular type of experiential teaching method – a business simulation game. There is a need for further research to investigate the perceived effectiveness of other experiential teaching methods, such as role‐plays and live cases. Furthermore, the paper does not examine the use of experiential teaching methods that do not require the physical presence of students.

Practical implications

For OM educators, the paper clarifies how they might incorporate experiential teaching methods in different class settings. Whilst experiential teaching methods are typically used for small post‐experience modules, these data indicate that the method can also be used on larger pre‐experience modules with great success. The paper also notes a number of challenges involved in using experiential teaching methods on both kinds of module.

Originality/value

This is the first known study to directly examine the perceived effectiveness of an experiential teaching method in both small post‐experience and larger pre‐experience OM modules.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 32 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Inés Küster and Natalia Vila

To compare marketing education methods in Europe and North America, and analyse the opinions about effectiveness underpinning educators' choices among available options.

Abstract

Purpose

To compare marketing education methods in Europe and North America, and analyse the opinions about effectiveness underpinning educators' choices among available options.

Design/methodology/approach

E‐mail questionnaires distributed to a sampling frame extracted from the worldwide directory of the Academy of Marketing Science were completed by 93 marketing academics in North America and 42 in Europe: a 26 per cent overall return rate. Data were analysed by χ2, ANOVA and correspondence analysis.

Findings

Three teaching‐and‐learning methods are most common in both environments: practical exercises, case studies and lectures. Europeans tend to rely on lectures and other traditional methods, while Americans make more use of technology‐based alternatives. The approach to the subject in Europe favours practical exercises, for their connection to the real world. Practice in North America reflects a cultural predisposition to personalised teaching, by emphasising face‐to‐face small‐group tutorials and one‐to‐one distance learning interaction. Teaching methods popular in the business world are little used across the sample, a somewhat paradoxical finding in a business‐school environment.

Research limitations/implications

The sample is comparatively small, and the European sub‐sample is not further broken down into cultural sub‐groups. Because the research instrument was adapted from one previous Spanish‐language survey, terminology may have influenced the responses.

Practical implications

The findings could be a useful input to planning of teaching and learning strategies, particularly in the international and distance‐learning contexts.

Originality/value

A rare comparative study of marketing education, suggesting fruitful directions for future research.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Case study
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Marlene M. Reed and Rochelle Reed Brunson

The purpose of this research is to identify studies that had been undertaken to determine the efficacy of the case method of teaching as compared to the lecture method in…

Abstract

Synopsis

The purpose of this research is to identify studies that had been undertaken to determine the efficacy of the case method of teaching as compared to the lecture method in an academic setting. An extensive search of secondary sources to identify research was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of case teaching as compared to the lecture method. The findings of this study indicate within the research reviewed the following positive results of case teaching noted by students: enhanced learning of the subject; heightened student engagement in the classroom; and the receipt of higher grades in some disciplines. The following negative results are also found: lack of understanding of course content and the method is more challenging and time consuming. In a national survey of faculty using the case method for the first time, the following positive outcomes of utilizing the case method were found: develops strong critical-thinking skills, greater retention of course material and more active engagement in the classroom. The limitations are the inconsistency of variables measured in the study and the small sample sizes. “Recommendations for further study include the use of larger sample sizes and a control group using the lecture method of teaching.”

Research methodology

An extensive search for all studies is performed in the classroom to evaluate and compare the use of the case method as compared to the lecture method of teaching.

Relevant courses and levels

The courses evaluated in the study are from a variety of disciplines in universities.

Theoretical bases

A review of research studies is performed to evaluate the efficacy of the case method of teaching as compared to the lecture method.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2019

Qiang Jian

This paper aims to study the effects of digital flipped classroom teaching method integrated cooperative learning model on learning motivation and outcome. From the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the effects of digital flipped classroom teaching method integrated cooperative learning model on learning motivation and outcome. From the perspective of promoting students’ learning engagement, this study puts forward suggestions for the effective implementation of flipped classroom teaching, so as to provide reference for the implementation of flipped classroom teaching practice in colleges and universities. Along with the time change and promotion of 12-year compulsory education, traditional didactic instruction can no longer satisfy all students. The reform wave in education is therefore emerged in past years, where the “flipped classroom” model strikes a chord and becomes a trend.

Design/methodology/approach

By applying nonequivalent pretest posttest control group design to the experimental research, 242 college students in Henan Province are selected as subjects of study. They are divided into four groups. The first group adopts the flip classroom teaching method. The second group adopts the cooperative teaching method. The third group adopts the flipping classroom teaching method integrated the cooperative teaching method. The fourth group (control group) adopts the traditional teaching method. The study lasted 15 weeks with sessions carried out 3 h a week.

Findings

The research results show significant effects of flipped classroom teaching method on learning motivation, flipped classroom teaching method on learning outcome, cooperative learning on learning motivation, cooperative learning on learning outcome, flipped classroom teaching method integrated cooperative learning on the promotion of learning motivation and flipped classroom teaching method integrated cooperative learning on the promotion of learning outcome.

Research limitations/implications

First, on the basis of consulting the links of many teaching strategies and summarizing the experience of flipped classroom practice in famous universities, a series of teaching strategies is put forward. However, the pertinence of different subjects may be different, which requires teachers to focus on the specific practice of reference. Second, due to the limitation of time, the author spent more time and energy on the proposal part of strategy, and the scientific nature of the strategy is not verified in practice, so it needs to spend time and practice in the later stage to improve this work.

Practical implications

This topic is the integrated design practice and research of flipped classroom in current teaching. The practical significance of the research is to find a solution to the problem of low learning efficiency of students in traditional classrooms, so as to update teachers’ teaching concepts, change teaching methods and promote teaching behaviors. In flipped classroom, there is a systematic integrated design process before, during and after class, which can effectively improve teachers’ teaching design ability, help students change their learning methods and truly improve students’ learning efficiency and effectiveness. The research on the implementation of flipped classroom can enrich the theory of flipped classroom, including the research on the orientation of learning theory and the reorientation of the role of teachers and students. This study can provide theoretical support for the strategies and environment for the cultivation of students’ independent learning ability. The results of this study can provide a reference for improving the scientificity and diversity of research methods.

Originality/value

Based on the integrated design of flipped classroom before, during and after class, this research systematically explores the role of flipped classroom in cultivating students’ autonomous learning ability in the teaching of information science and technology, and studies how to maximize the role of flipped classroom in teaching to promote and help students’ learning. In addition, a special iterative method is adopted. In each round of research, according to the opinions of students and peers, the inadequacies and improvements in the last round of research is found, certain links are increased or decreased, and finally the research goals are achieved.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2013

M.S. Rao

The purpose of this paper is to explore Meka's method – an innovative teaching and training tool to teach and train students and trainees effectively to achieve desired

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore Meka's method – an innovative teaching and training tool to teach and train students and trainees effectively to achieve desired teaching and training takeaways.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology is gleaned from the author's 31 years of practical experience in industry, teaching, training, research and consultancy. It places emphasis on the need to take feedback from students through their body language and mould their teaching style accordingly during the teaching session to create a compatibility and chemistry with the students. It explains humor quotient and elaborates Just a minute (JAM) session. It enlightens 80:20 teaching based on Pareto's Principle.

Findings

The paper unveils tools to inspire students and unfolds teaching techniques. It implores teachers to unlearn, relearn and learn to remain relevant and competent in the current context.

Research limitations/implications

Qualitative/action research inevitably needs to be backed up by more formal research into the topic. This paper offers an agenda for action and further qualitative/quantitative research in teaching and training methodologies.

Practical implications

The tool can be applied in teaching and training sessions. It enables improvement of training and teaching pedagogy. It is transferable wholly or partially to educational institutions and organizations.

Social implications

This innovative teaching and training tool is essential for teachers and trainers to bring out the behavioral changes among the audiences and impact the society as a whole.

Originality/value

The article offers a unique concept to add value to teaching and training so as to benefit students and participants with the help of a diagram.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 45 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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