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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2004

Kevin Nield

This paper considers the learning, teaching and assessment preferences of the Chinese learner in the context of distance learning. To do this a literature search of the…

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Abstract

This paper considers the learning, teaching and assessment preferences of the Chinese learner in the context of distance learning. To do this a literature search of the teaching, learning and assessment preferences of Chinese students was conducted. The search indicated that there are several possible differences. These are that Chinese students are rote learners who have distinct preferences for certain methods of teaching, learning and assessment, and have a different view of the role of the teacher. In order to test this, a qualitative questionnaire covering these issues was completed by 25 Hong Kong Chinese students who are studying distance learning courses offered at the School of Sport and Leisure Management, Sheffield Hallam University. From the research the paper concludes that there are educational differences that must be addressed if Chinese students are to reach their full potential on distance learning courses offered by UK universities.

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International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2019

Janette Brunstein, Marta Fabiano Sambiase, Roberto Borges Kerr, Claudine Brunnquell and Luiz Carlos Jacob Perera

The purpose of this study is to argue for the need for more critical-reflective teaching-learning experiences in finance teaching, capable of promoting changes in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to argue for the need for more critical-reflective teaching-learning experiences in finance teaching, capable of promoting changes in students’ frames of reference toward sustainability. The aim was to evaluate the levels of reflection and the transformative learning experiences perceived by undergraduate students enrolled in three finance disciplines at a Business Administration course of a Brazilian business school. This course has been the object of pedagogical experience toward sustainability teaching-learning for some years.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used mixed data. For quantitative data, the authors collected 188 questionnaires, as well as 160 student-written reports for qualitative data.

Findings

Incorporating sustainability topics into finance disciplines, longitudinally, stimulates critical reflection and transformations in students’ mindsets toward sustainable rationality in finance. Despite the high number of agreements with reflection and critical reflection levels, emphasis only on the theoretical discussion of sustainability presuppositions does little to contribute to the practical application of concepts.

Research limitations/implications

Although the study was conducted in a particular Business School, the authors expect that the results can be replicated and improved in comparative studies, encouraging transformative learning in the teaching-learning of finance.

Practical implications

The results show the potential and limitations of the experiences studied and its implications for theoretical and didactics in finance teaching. The discussions and the examples of practical activities presented can bring contributions to educators, professors and researchers.

Originality/value

Few studies in finance seeks to evaluate pedagogical experiences from the point of view of students’ learning, especially in relation to the development of a new rationality.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Book part
Publication date: 7 December 2021

Rasa Poceviciene

March 30, 2020 is a day of qualitative changes in the Lithuanian education system. This day in history – at least in the history of education – will record the day when…

Abstract

March 30, 2020 is a day of qualitative changes in the Lithuanian education system. This day in history – at least in the history of education – will record the day when mass distance learning began in the entire Lithuanian education system. All educational activities from kindergarten to higher and adult education were organized at a distance. In fact, the idea of distance learning was not so new in Lithuania. The first steps in developing a distance learning system in Lithuania were taken 25 years ago, but before the pandemic, it was more the exception than the norm and, of course, it had never been global. But in Spring 2020, all educational institutions (in general education during 2 weeks, in higher – even only during 2–3 days) were transformed from contact to distance learning. From a few-month perspective, it can be said that, despite all the circumstances, this transformation has been quite successful. In order to better understand the reasons for this quite sufficiently successful transition, it would be worthwhile to briefly review the organization of distance learning in Lithuania until the 2020 pandemic.

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Book part
Publication date: 18 January 2021

Divya Sharma

Curriculum designers have a colossal role to perform. They behold responsibility of viewing futuristic needs not only of society but also of the planet as a whole. They…

Abstract

Curriculum designers have a colossal role to perform. They behold responsibility of viewing futuristic needs not only of society but also of the planet as a whole. They have taken into consideration not only intangible needs of society but also cognitive, affective, and psychomotor needs of individual learners. Curriculum as a whole tends to stress more on the cognitive development of the child more, whereas the, “affective learning …is included infrequently in curriculum” (Sowell, 2005, p.74); thus at times affective and psychomotor domains are overlooked during curriculum transaction. Emotional development is important for the development of humane society. Combs (1982) notes that when we ignore emotional components of any subject we teach, we actually deprive students of meaningfulness. So there is a need to give importance to the development of values among the students. As microcosms of society school curriculum can play an important role in developing a humane society. This purpose can be realized to some extent by modifying the school curriculum in such a manner that values and skills that are expected for imbibing humane culture are integrated along with the content of the regular school curriculum. The process of designing school curriculum so as to integrate the sustainable development goals may include defining learning outcomes, identifying plug points for integration, ascertaining strategies for integration at cognitive, affective and psychomotor domain, devising curriculum transaction plan, implementing integrated curriculum, evaluating, reviewing and monitoring learning outcomes, and implementing process. It is possible to develop a climate of encouraging and safeguarding cultural heritage by developing resources to educate people. Cultural heritage and traditional knowledge can be safeguarded by supporting practitioners and transmission of skills and knowledge. Plugins can be provided in secondary education at various levels of languages, mathematics and sciences to integrate the curriculum. This text provides comprehensive process and strategies to equip curriculum designers and educators as they guide a whole generation to a bright, safe and beautiful future.

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Christine Hogan

Many innovations have taken place in the teaching‐learning strategies for organisational behaviour (OB), in the School of Management over the past 18 months. This paper…

Abstract

Many innovations have taken place in the teaching‐learning strategies for organisational behaviour (OB), in the School of Management over the past 18 months. This paper describes the impetus for these changes (i.e. budget pressures) and the search for alternative teaching‐learning strategies suitable for organisational behaviour. It documents the journey of lecturers, part‐time staff and students who took part in this adventure. The change process involved a team of eight full‐time and ten part‐time staff members and over 800 students in a multicultural environment. During the first meeting, students had to negotiate their roles, desirable group norms and the gradations of penalties they would use if these ground rules were not adhered to. Each week the roles of facilitator, facilitator’s buddy, time‐keeper and scribe were rotated. Students learnt to work with “dominators”, “quiet members”, “social loafers”, “poor timekeepers”. Some learnt to confront conflict, others decided to ignore it. Student assignments included a creative learning log and a report describing in depth what they learnt themselves and working in groups and relating their experiences to models and theories of organisational behaviour.

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International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1997

Sue Thompson

A case study of one university’s strategic approach to the promotion, support and resourcing of teaching and learning developments within the institution. This is set in…

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A case study of one university’s strategic approach to the promotion, support and resourcing of teaching and learning developments within the institution. This is set in the context of external requirements for quality assurance and the changing nature of higher education. Strategy is described in terms of policy development and implementation of new frameworks and support structures. A particular feature of the strategy is support for school‐based development and the appointment of school‐based teaching and learning co‐ordinates (TLCs). Explains the rationale for TLCs and the means by which they were introduced. Gives examples of how the TLC role works in practice. Identifies successes and pitfalls, as well as issues for further development.

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Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2018

Linda Daniela, Raimonds Strods, Zanda Rubene and Sandra Kalniņa

Even though it has already been 25 years since the collapse of the Soviet Union and the regaining of independence for the Republic of Latvia, teacher education faces…

Abstract

Even though it has already been 25 years since the collapse of the Soviet Union and the regaining of independence for the Republic of Latvia, teacher education faces various and specific problems brought forth by the experience behind the ‘iron curtain’, spanning five decades. Ever since regaining its independence, Latvia has implemented ambitious education reforms. A new education reform has been launched in Latvia, which start to implement the competency approach in general education by 2018. A vital aspect of this reform is teacher education. In preparing teachers, universities have an extra task – to promote competency of the future teachers to implement the competency approach in schools, in a student-centred study process. The organisation process must change during the university study process in order to accommodate that the future teachers acquire actual competencies by using modern technologies and modern learning strategies, thus later promoting active involvement of students in the construction of their competencies.

This study carried out a survey of 170 students of the teacher education programme at the University of Latvia and revealed problem areas that should be changed in the teacher education process to ensure that the future teachers are able to implement the competency approach in schools. IBM SPSS Statistics 22 was used to analyse data. The research objective was to learn student-teachers’ ability to implement competency approach in their pedagogical work.

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The Future of Innovation and Technology in Education: Policies and Practices for Teaching and Learning Excellence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-555-5

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Book part
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Patrick Blessinger and John M. Carfora

This chapter provides an introduction to how the inquiry-based learning (IBL) approach is being used by colleges and universities around the world to strengthen the…

Abstract

This chapter provides an introduction to how the inquiry-based learning (IBL) approach is being used by colleges and universities around the world to strengthen the interconnections between teaching, learning, and research within STEM programs. This chapter provides a synthesis and analysis of the chapters in the volume, which present a range of case studies and empirical research on how IBL is being used across a range of courses across a range of institutions within STEM programs. Based on these findings, this chapter argues that the IBL approach has great potential to enhance and transform teaching and learning. Given the growing demands placed on education to meet a diverse range of complex political, economic, and social problems and personal needs, this chapter argues that education should be a place where students learn “how-to-learn” – where increasingly higher levels of self-directed learning is fostered – and where students grow in the three key areas of learning: affectively, behaviorally, and cognitively. To that end, this chapter argues that IBL, if designed and implemented properly, can be an important approach to enhancing and transforming teaching and learning in higher education.

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Inquiry-Based Learning for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (Stem) Programs: A Conceptual and Practical Resource for Educators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-850-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Mallika Bose, Eliza Pennypacker and Thomas Yahner

A group of faculty at Penn State's Department of Landscape Architecture observed that the traditional master/apprentice model of studio instruction fosters greater student…

Abstract

A group of faculty at Penn State's Department of Landscape Architecture observed that the traditional master/apprentice model of studio instruction fosters greater student dependence on faculty for decision-making guidance than the faculty considers desirable. They contend that this traditional model promotes a studio dynamic that encourages students to look to the professor for design ideas and wait for faculty approval before making design decisions. The faculty considered this decision-making dependency to be in conflict with the need for students to develop the critical-thinking skills required to address the complex and ill-structured problems that are common in architecture and landscape architecture. In response to their concern this faculty team developed a studio teaching method they termed “independent design decision-making.” They speculated that by transferring the responsibility for design decisions from professor to the student, students could improve their critical thinking and gain confidence in design decision-making. The faculty conceived a set of strategies to implement in a 3rd year team-taught site planning and design studio that presents a range of complex design issues and scales. In collaboration with Penn State's Schreyer Institute for Teaching Excellence, the faculty researchers developed a 2-year comparative study to test this new teaching method in the same design studio with two consecutive student groups-evaluating the strategies implemented in the first year, refining methods, then applying and re-evaluating the results in the next year's class. These new strategies included ways students receive information to inspire their designs (“input strategies”) and ways to receive critique on their design ideas (“feedback strategies”). Two evaluation instruments were chosen to assess this method of studio teaching: 1) the Group Embedded Figures Test (GEFT), and 2) Student Assessment of Learning Gains (SALG). This paper presents this teaching/learning method and reports on the results of the comparative study.

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Open House International, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

Joe Tin-yau Lo, Irene Nga-yee Cheng and Emmy Man-yee Wong

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the complex, intricate relationships between the central (intended) curriculum, teachers’ perceived curriculums, and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the complex, intricate relationships between the central (intended) curriculum, teachers’ perceived curriculums, and the enacted/assessed curriculum in classroom contexts. To do this, the authors have used Hong Kong’s new core senior-secondary liberal studies (LS) curriculum as a case study, with a special focus on its key pedagogical component – inquiry teaching/learning.

Design/methodology/approach

This study’s objects are two teachers (from two local schools), each with a LS teacher’s education. Documentary analysis, lesson observation, and focus interviews were used to triangulate data for interpretation and analysis.

Findings

The findings illuminate: how LS teachers’ perceptions of inquiry teaching/learning relate to and align with the advocacy embodied in the intended curriculum, the relationships between teachers’ perceptions and practices of inquiry learning and teaching, and how this aspect of the intended curriculum reform can be made more relevant to the classroom context.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the under-researched area of curriculum gaps and (mis)alignments in Hong Kong’s LS curriculum reform.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

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