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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2018

Irit Levy-Feldman

The purpose of this paper is to propose a new conception of the “good teacher” – that of the teacher-as-mentor, or, as the author refer to it, the “mentoring teacher,” who…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a new conception of the “good teacher” – that of the teacher-as-mentor, or, as the author refer to it, the “mentoring teacher,” who is equipped with heutagogical skills aimed at promoting self-determined learning through dialogic teaching. This conception appears to be better suited than current conceptions for the twenty-first century and the postmodern era.

Design/methodology/approach

The conception is based on an interpretative textual analysis of western educational philosophies and of the nature of postmodernity.

Findings

The mentoring teacher, presented to be the “good teacher” for the new era, is provided with skills associated with heutagogy: a pedagogical approach that emphasizes the individual’s need to learn autonomously and independently and that regards the capacity to do so as a basic skill for living and lifelong learning in the changing world. Using dialogic teaching, mentoring teachers equipped with heutagogical skills can navigate their teaching to promote the self-learning abilities of different learners and better prepare them to navigate the challenges of the current era.

Research limitations/implications

This paper presents one perspective on looking at the changes that have occurred in the conception of the good teacher in western society and offers one point of view of the image of the new good teacher, hoping it might stimulate new thinking on the need to reconsider the role of the teacher in contemporary western society.

Originality/value

Placing the focus on teachers’ skills as opposed to students’ needs, which is much more common, invites discussion regarding the image of the good teacher and teacher education.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Rachel Roegman, Emilie Mitescu Reagan, A. Lin Goodwin and Julia Yu

– The purpose of this paper is to examine mentor teachers’ approaches to mentoring preservice teachers in a yearlong teacher residency program (TRP).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine mentor teachers’ approaches to mentoring preservice teachers in a yearlong teacher residency program (TRP).

Design/methodology/approach

This multiple-methods study examined 15 mentor teachers’ approaches over the course of a year in an urban TRP through the lens of Wang and Odell’s (2002) framework for mentoring. Data sources included mentors’ self-assessments over three points in time across one academic year. These self-assessments included numerical ratings of practice (quantitative) as well as open-ended rationales and goal setting (qualitative).

Findings

Mentors predominately provided support and technical assistance to the residents learning to teach, drawing on humanistic, and situated apprentice perspectives on mentoring. They worked to develop residents’ self-confidence and exposed residents to a range of practices and school contexts. Glimmers of a more critical constructive approach were apparent in some mentors’ discussions of reflection and collaboration.

Research limitations/implications

This study informs the work of teacher education programs as they develop mentoring structures that align with program visions, expand notions of mentoring, and consider the many roles of a mentor teacher.

Originality/value

Increased emphasis on clinical experiences for preservice teachers highlights the need to attend to the practices of the mentor teachers with whom they work. These mentors, as field-based teacher educators, play a critical role in teacher education, and teacher education programs need to support their professional development as mentors. Understanding mentors’ approaches to mentoring is necessary in order to provide this support.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2009

Graham Badley

The purpose of this paper is to outline a reflective essaying model as a useful way of encouraging learning in higher education. It aims to define reflective essaying as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline a reflective essaying model as a useful way of encouraging learning in higher education. It aims to define reflective essaying as the free and serious play of mind on an interesting topic in an attempt to learn.

Design/methodology/approach

Reflective essaying is first introduced as a unifying concept in the model. Second, the model is introduced and justified especially in connection with De Montaigne's invention of the essai as a process of trying out opinions and testing responses. Third, the role of teachers as essaying mentors is discussed. Fourth, mentoring for essaying is examined as a learning transaction which exemplifies Dewey's transactional theory of experience and knowing.

Findings

Reflective essaying is promoted as an important way of letting students try to learn. Reflective mentors should promote student learning through reflective essaying which would encourage students to develop their own criticality.

Practical implications

The paper has implications for both teachers and students. Teachers are urged to become more like mentors and less like didactic instructors. As mentors they should be encouraging students to see academic writing as trying out, as essaying, as experimenting with, and as learning through the ideas and materials they reflect upon.

Originality/value

The paper is original in its approach in that it draws on a wide range of historical and contemporary sources on essaying in order to re‐evaluate and resurrect essaying as an experimental process of learning.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 51 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2019

William Walters, Daniel Bruce Robinson and Jared Walters

Within teacher education, many experienced in-service teachers routinely mentor pre-service teachers during teaching practicums. Notwithstanding the benefits pre-service…

Abstract

Purpose

Within teacher education, many experienced in-service teachers routinely mentor pre-service teachers during teaching practicums. Notwithstanding the benefits pre-service teachers are meant to experience from these mentor–protégé relationships and experiences, recent research has demonstrated that mentors, too, may experience some (oftentimes unintended) potential benefits. The purpose of this paper is to further investigate such potential benefits within a Canadian secondary school physical education (PE) context.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers employed a qualitative case study methodology. The three primary data sources included field observations/notes, journals and interviews. More specifically, over a ten-week period, the researchers made 26 field visits, observing two mentors’ interactions with five protégés before, during, and after PE class instruction; collected the two mentors’ ten journal entries, all made in response to researcher-provided writing prompts; and interviewed the two mentors, both individually and together.

Findings

The mentor teachers viewed the mentor–protégé relationship/experience as meaningful professional development, recognizing that it approximated a professional learning community. Relatedly, the mentor teachers experienced professional growth with respect to their own teaching identity and teaching practice.

Research limitations/implications

This research could inform those who structure and/or coordinate mentoring research within teacher education programs so that they might place a more purposeful focus upon the potential and/or idealized outcomes for mentors (as well as for protégés). Given the single case study methodology, this research may lack generalizability to other educational contexts.

Originality/value

This research adds to the emerging body of research that investigates how mentoring may provide benefits to mentors. More specifically, this research suggests benefits to mentors relate, especially, to their own teaching identity and practice.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2012

Manju P. George and Sebastian Rupert Mampilly

The essence of management education lies in preparing and enabling the students to evolve cognitively, affectively and behaviorally into capable ones equipped to meet and…

Abstract

Purpose

The essence of management education lies in preparing and enabling the students to evolve cognitively, affectively and behaviorally into capable ones equipped to meet and manage challenges from within and outside their organisations or workplaces. Mentoring, as pedagogy, results in enhancing effectiveness of B‐schools (Institutions offering MBA program) in ensuring the transformation of students into professionals. The purpose of this paper is to analyze and evaluate the formal and teacher‐initiated student mentoring in B‐schools in Kerala in terms of the designated activities, to establish effectiveness of mentoring as outcomes of faculty‐related antecedents and mentoring activities, and to demonstrate the effectiveness in terms of the psycho‐social changes of students.

Design/methodology/approach

This research employed a conclusive approach that combined the features of descriptive and explanatory research designs. The respondents of the study comprised 141 permanent teachers, 327 first‐year students and 318 final‐year students enrolled in the management programs of 19 B‐schools in Kerala that had minimum five years of existence and approval of the All India Council of Technical Education (AICTE).

Findings

The study revealed that less than half of the B‐schools had implemented a mentoring program as part of their pedagogy. A structural equation model using the partial least square technique validated the conceptual model and the findings revealed that socio‐demographic characteristics, mentoring activities (teach the job, provide challenge, teach politics, career help, sponsor, career counseling and trust) influenced effectiveness of mentoring.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted only among B‐schools, hence the research results may lack generalization. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to test the proposed model further.

Practical Implications

The paper includes a conceptual framework employed for bringing about effectiveness of mentoring, proven to be valid and may be considered by B‐schools that are institutionalizing mentoring as an element of the pedagogy.

Originality/value

The paper bridges the perceptible lack of theoretical and empirical bases to explain the dynamics of student mentoring in management institutes in the country and will be an eye‐opener to management institutions which have not incorporated mentoring as part of their pedagogy.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

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Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2015

Melissa Mosley Wetzel, James V. Hoffman and Beth Maloch

Our purpose in this chapter is to present a model of coaching used in a preservice elementary teacher preparation program that relies on video as a mentoring tool. We call…

Abstract

Purpose

Our purpose in this chapter is to present a model of coaching used in a preservice elementary teacher preparation program that relies on video as a mentoring tool. We call this tool RCA, or Retrospective Coaching Analysis, and it is based on Goodman’s (1996) work on Retrospective Miscue Analysis. We also provide examples of how cooperating teachers used videos to identify important moments of practice to elicit reflection with their preservice teachers.

Methodology/approach

We collected video recordings of cooperating teacher/preservice teacher pairs engaging in mentoring conversations using videos of preservice teachers’ practice.

Findings

In this chapter, we focus on the cooperating teachers’ choices about when to stop the video to engage in reflection with their preservice teachers. In selecting a focus point for the RCA Event, the CTs chose moments that met some of these four criteria: appreciative, learner-focused, disruptive, and/or generative. We also found the challenges in selecting focus points and in staying with moments of video long enough to generate reflection, which made the model of mentoring challenging to implement.

Research limitations/implications

The analysis of this reflective mentoring tool has led to revisions in our theoretical model of coaching, as described in this chapter. The research suggests the importance of closely examining reflective talk between cooperating teachers and preservice teachers. Our work also illustrates a shift in the use of video in preservice teaching from a video-case based perspectives to reflection embedded in practice.

Practical implications

Our study suggests the importance of selecting moments of practice as the basis for mentoring and coaching, but the research helped us to understand that RCA has affordances and constraints, and therefore, should be a tool for teachers to use flexibly within our theoretical model of Coaching with CARE.

Originality/value

Teacher educators will find the RCA model to be a new way of approaching collaborative work with teachers in the field within a practice-based teacher education program.

Details

Video Reflection in Literacy Teacher Education and Development: Lessons from Research and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-676-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

S. Earl Irving, Dennis W. Moore and Richard J. Hamilton

Examines the effects of a three‐year mentoring programme on the academic achievement of high ability year 13 students at a New Zealand high school. The programme’s purpose…

Abstract

Examines the effects of a three‐year mentoring programme on the academic achievement of high ability year 13 students at a New Zealand high school. The programme’s purpose was to improve the academic results in the university bursary examination. The study covered a period of six years. The programme matched each selected student with a staff member in a flexible mentoring arrangement which focused on generic skills such as study skills, goal setting and time management. Protégés and mentors felt that the programme was enjoyable and successful. Protégés felt that they gained from the skills they were taught. Statistical analysis indicates that the programme did not have a measurable effect on the academic achievement of the mentored students. Reasons for this and implications for programmes of this kind are discussed.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Maureen Woodd

Concentrates on the mentoring support for teachers in further education (FE) and higher education (HE), rather than the mentoring of students following qualification…

Abstract

Concentrates on the mentoring support for teachers in further education (FE) and higher education (HE), rather than the mentoring of students following qualification programmes. Raises issues of definition and argues the need for peer mentoring. Evaluates mentoring models and explores issues of role modelling, selection, styles, skills and qualities. Covers literature from the USA, Canada, Australia and Europe and spans the period 1793‐1996, starting with a British Library reference called “The Female Mentor” and including the recent upsurge in mentoring interest across business and the professions.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 39 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

David Cameron and Anna Grant

The purpose of this paper is to explore the ways in which external subject-specific mentoring can influence the professional identity construction of early career physics…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the ways in which external subject-specific mentoring can influence the professional identity construction of early career physics teachers (ECPT).

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology evolved from the evaluation of a mentoring project, involving semi-structured interviews with a number of early career teachers. Responses from 18 teachers, which related to the impact of the mentoring relationship on their professional identity development, were subject to a process of iterative thematic coding in the context of interpretative repertoires via a collaborative “developmental dialogue” between the managers of the mentoring project and its external evaluators.

Findings

The analysis of participants’ responses suggested that the nature of the relationship between early career teacher and mentor played a role in the emergence, or suppression, of their professional identities as physics teachers at the start of their teaching careers. In some cases, mentoring provision was little short of a “lifeline” for the teachers.

Practical implications

Mentors need the opportunity to develop their professional practice and identity through contact with the community of teacher educators. The practice of training, mentoring and coaching teachers should be valued at least as much as teaching itself and should be recognised as its own professional practice.

Originality/value

This study builds on a number of well-established pieces of research and concepts relating to the challenges facing early career teachers and their professional identity construction. It provides insight into the challenges facing ECPTs specifically, which includes the risk of isolation and unrealistic expectations from colleagues. It not only confirms the merits of external mentoring, but also demonstrates the significant responsibility, which comes with the mentor’s role and the negative impact on teachers’ professional identity construction caused by deficiencies in mentoring.

Abstract

Details

Leading Education Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-130-3

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