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Article

Tajularipin Sulaiman, Amalina Ibrahim, Saeid Motevalli, Kai Yan Wong and Muhammad Nazrul Hakim

This paper aims to examine the effect of e-evaluation on work motivation among teachers during the Movement Control Order (MCO) in COVID-19 and determining the mediating…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the effect of e-evaluation on work motivation among teachers during the Movement Control Order (MCO) in COVID-19 and determining the mediating role of stress.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is designed using a causal research design to examine the cause-effect relationship between the study variables. The study sample consists of 595 school teachers selected via convenient sampling. Quantitative data are collected from an online survey through the questionnaires with demographic, stress, e-evaluation and work motivation developed by the researchers were distributed during the MCO period. To test the model, structural equation modelling (SEM) was applied by using AMOS 21.

Findings

The results indicated that the e-evaluation, stress and work motivation of teachers during the MCO were conducted at a moderate level. The stress relationship with work motivation of teachers was also weak and showed a negative relationship, while e-evaluation and work motivation showed a strong relationship. The results of the SEM analysis revealed that the model fit was achieved with RMSEA = 0.07, GFI = 0.96, CFI = 0.98, TLI = 0.97, ChiSq/df = 4.30 and p =0.00. In addition, there was no role of stress as a mediator in the relationship between e-evaluation and work motivation and e-evaluation contributed 54% to work motivation.

Research limitations/implications

This study underlines our contention that teachers’ work motivation correlated positively with their e-evaluation. The findings suggest that teachersstress cannot mediate the relationship between e-evaluation and work motivation. The limitations of the study include the convenience sampling, non-probability sampling technique, not chosen at random and undermines the generalizations from sample to the population.

Practical implications

The results provide a useful framework to teachers for the successful implementation of e-evaluations in their instruction to enhance their work-motivation.

Originality/value

There is a lack of e-evaluation studies in teacher education and teaching strategies, and the correlation between e-evaluation and work motivation during COVID-19 pandemic is often absent.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Content available
Article

Miki Kuwabara, Koji Oba, Nao Takano, Noritoshi Nagamine, Yoko Maruyama, Nobuhiro Ito, Izumi Watanabe, Chikako Ikeda and Junichi Sakamoto

Occupational stress-relating overwork among teachers predispose to mental disorders and eventually lead to long leave from work. Although some studies have been conducted…

Abstract

Purpose

Occupational stress-relating overwork among teachers predispose to mental disorders and eventually lead to long leave from work. Although some studies have been conducted to assess these problems among elementary and junior high school teachers, a quantitative investigation has been limited to date. In this study, the authors sought to explore the association between overwork and mental stress among Japanese elementary and junior high school teachers.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory cross-sectional questionnaire survey was carried out on 294 Japanese elementary and junior high school teachers. The respondents filled a questionnaire on personal data, and occupational stress reaction was evaluated by Japanese version of Brief Job Questionnaire. Multiple linear regression model was used to evaluate the association between overwork information and psychological and physical stress.

Findings

Working during holidays was significantly likely to increase psychological and physical stress reactions among elementary school teachers (adjusted mean difference = −1.67, 95% CI: −2.81 to −0.54) and junior high school teachers (adjusted mean difference = −5.24, 95% CI: −9.60 to −0.87). A weakly positive association was found between high risk of psychological and physical stress and marital status (p = 0.005), teacher in charge of class (p = 0.015) among elementary school teachers.

Originality/value

This study indicated an association between working during holidays and psychological and physical stress reactions among elementary and junior high school teachers after adjusting for sociodemographic and work-related status. Further study for the confirmation of this finding is warranted.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article

Jinda Kongcharoen, Nutthajit Onmek, Panaya Jandang and Sukanya Wangyisen

The purpose of this paper is to explore the levels of stress and work motivation of primary and secondary school teachers, investigate factors affecting stress of teachers

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the levels of stress and work motivation of primary and secondary school teachers, investigate factors affecting stress of teachers and validate the consistency of the model and empirical data.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consisted of 400 teachers of primary and secondary schools. Questionnaire was implemented as the instrument and the data were analyzed by t-test, ANOVA and confirmatory factor analysis.

Findings

The results indicated that teachers of secondary schools have higher overall stress than teachers of primary schools for many reasons, such as financial issues and work obligations. Stress was found to be significantly positively associated with work motivation in secondary school teachers. The study revealed that demographic and work motivation factors influence teacher stress. The validation of a goodness of fitted model demonstrated an acceptable model fit with empirical data (χ2 test/df = 1.913, GFI = 0.934, CFI = 0.965, NFI = 0.930, AGFI = 0.893).

Originality/value

Teachers under stress could negatively influence their students’ academic performance and might be more vulnerable to occupational diseases. Therefore, the teachers should find favorite activities that reduce stress and thereby contribute to effective teaching. This study would be beneficial for anyone who works to support teachers and wants to reduce turnover among teachers.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article

Bi Ying Hu, Yuanhua Li, Chuang Wang, Barry Lee Reynolds and Shuang Wang

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between school climate and teacher stress. Specifically, the authors construct two parsimonious models to test two…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between school climate and teacher stress. Specifically, the authors construct two parsimonious models to test two main hypotheses. First, whether preschool collegial leadership predicts teachers’ job stress through the mediating role of teacher self-efficacy; second, whether teacher professionalism influences teachers’ perceptions of occupational stress through the mediating role of teacher self-efficacy.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conceptualized the mediating role of teacher efficacy as an important mechanism that can help to explain the effect of school climate on teacher stress. School climate consisted of two dimensions: principal collegial leadership and professionalism. Therefore, the authors constructed and examined two mediation models by using Bootstrapping mediation modeling: first, preschool teacher self-efficacy as a mediator between preschool collegial leadership and teacher stress; second, preschool teacher self-efficacy as a mediator between preschool teacher professionalism and teacher stress.

Findings

Results from two mediation analyses showed that principal collegial leadership exerts a significant negative effect on preschool teachersstress through the mediating role of teacher self-efficacy. Moreover, professionalism was also a significant predictor of preschool teachersstress through the mediating role of teacher self-efficacy.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the literature in terms of understanding the mechanism of how school climate helps to reduce teacher stress. First, the authors found that teachers’ individual well-being can be efficiently enhanced through a more collegial leadership. Second, the preschool leadership teams can create a supportive climate to reduce teachersstress by improving teachers’ professionalism.

Originality/value

This study offers a new perspective about understanding the internal and external mechanism of teacher stress. The authors discussed the results in light of the recent push by the Chinese Government to teacher quality improvement in early childhood education. The authors argued for prioritizing support for building a supportive school climate for teachers.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 57 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article

Guoliang Yu, Yan Dong, Qi Wang and Ran An

To improve humanized management of Chinese teachers, the aim of this study is to, first, investigate the stress of Chinese teachers, and, second, to examine the…

Abstract

Purpose

To improve humanized management of Chinese teachers, the aim of this study is to, first, investigate the stress of Chinese teachers, and, second, to examine the relationship of teacher stress with coping strategies and social support. Moreover, an attempt is made to examine the moderating role of coping strategies in the relationship between social support and teacher stress.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants consisted of 363 teachers from 6 public primary and secondary schools (both regular and vocational schools), who completed 3 self-report questionnaires examining teacher stress, coping strategies and social support. The methodology used was t-test, correlation analysis and hierarchical multiple regression analysis.

Findings

There are more than 50 per cent of primary and secondary school teachers suffering from mild to extremely severe stress. Working environment (regular or vocational schools), gender and age affect teacher stress. Social support and passive strategies have significant relationships with teacher stress, and passive strategies moderate the relationship between social support and teacher stress.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based on a sample taken from public primary and secondary schools, and the character of the research was cross-sectional. Therefore, we must be cautious in generalizing the findings. An important implication for management of the findings of this study is the importance of humanized management for teachers. To reduce teacher stress, more social support should be provided by educational administrators, and teachers should be trained to avoid using passive strategies.

Originality/value

Through the investigation into the teacher stress in both regular and vocational schools, this study provides a new point of view for human resource managers to control and reduce teacher stress in China by improved humanized management.

Details

Journal of Chinese Human Resource Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8005

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Article

John McCormick

Presents the results of an analysis of questionnaire and interview data revealing significant differences in occupational stress between groups of public school teachers

Abstract

Presents the results of an analysis of questionnaire and interview data revealing significant differences in occupational stress between groups of public school teachers, in New South Wales, Australia. In particular, emphasizes the importance of differentiating between executive and classroom teachers, primary/infants and secondary teachers, teachers at different career stages and teachers in geographical locations, when planning to alleviate stress in the future. The fact that primary/infants teachers reported greater stress attributable to student misbehaviour than secondary teachers reinforces the need to distinguish between the perceived “objective strength” of a stressor and the degree of distress felt by a teacher.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article

John McCormick, Paul L. Ayres and Bernice Beechey

The main research aim was to investigate relationships among teachers' occupational stress, coping, teacher self‐efficacy and relevant teachers' perceptions of curriculum…

Abstract

Purpose

The main research aim was to investigate relationships among teachers' occupational stress, coping, teacher self‐efficacy and relevant teachers' perceptions of curriculum changes in a major educational reform.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical framework that included the attribution of responsibility for stress model, aspects of social cognitive theory and perceptions of the changes to the HSC, was used to guide the study. Multilevel variance decomposition and structural equation modelling were employed.

Findings

Stress attributions to personal and organizational domains were associated with the teachers' perceived stress from implementation of the new curriculum. Furthermore, results suggested that these teachers may have coped with stress associated with the changes using palliative strategies rather than direct problem solving. Teachers' greater understanding of what the curriculum changes entailed was associated with lower teacher self‐efficacy.

Practical implications

Emphasises that curriculum reform cannot be carried out in a vacuum, and that teachers' mental models or schemata of the education system within which they work are likely to influence their interpretations of the reform and its implementation. Analyses provide insights into teachers' cognition in relation to stress and self‐efficacy during curriculum change.

Originality/value

The nature of the reform, which was the focus of this study, is relatively rare, for both the magnitude of the curriculum change and the size of the education system (750,000 students) involved.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article

DAVID J. LEACH

Recent surveys have shown that between 20 per cent to 40 per cent of teachers experience considerable stress when working in schools. Following a summary of research into…

Abstract

Recent surveys have shown that between 20 per cent to 40 per cent of teachers experience considerable stress when working in schools. Following a summary of research into the sources and correlates of reported teacher stress, this paper proposes a definition and a model of work‐related stress in school that incorporates current concepts and research findings. Examples of tactics and strategies for coping with and reducing the build‐up of environmental stressors are developed from the model. These aim to provide pointers for the multi‐level management of stress throughout schools.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article

John J. De Nobile and John McCormick

The purpose of this paper is to investigate relationships between biographical variables of gender, age experience and employment position and occupational stress of staff…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate relationships between biographical variables of gender, age experience and employment position and occupational stress of staff members in Catholic primary schools.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 356 staff members from Catholic primary schools in New South Wales, Australia. Research hypotheses were tested using multivariate analysis and comparison of means.

Findings

Age, gender and position are found to be related to three out of the four identified domains of occupational stress as well as overall occupational stress. In addition, male staff experience higher levels of general occupational stress than their female colleague overall.

Practical implications

The findings hold implications for school systems and school administrators in relation to teacher retention, schools as organizations and gender issues. Further research regarding stress of teacher's aides is also recommended.

Originality/value

The paper includes non‐teaching staff and investigates the role of employment position as a biographical variable.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article

Janice T.S. Ho

Suggests that although stress research has burgeoned in recent years, little attention has been paid to the relationship between leisure satisfaction, work stress and…

Abstract

Suggests that although stress research has burgeoned in recent years, little attention has been paid to the relationship between leisure satisfaction, work stress and psychological wellbeing. Presents data from secondary school teachers in a major UK city. A validated teacher stress measure comprising role‐related, task‐based, and environmental stress was used to tap the nature and prevalence of teacher stress. Results showed that overall teacher stress arose from five main areas: role‐related issues (e.g. overload, conflict, ambiguity); general job satisfaction; life satisfaction; supervisory support; and student discipline problems. A positive association was found between the amount of work stress reported and poor psychological health as measured by the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). While no strong relationship was found between leisure satisfaction and stress, overall leisure satisfaction was significantly correlated with life satisfaction. The findings provide evidence that relaxational leisure satisfaction could well be a moderator of occupational stress for some teachers.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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