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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

JOSEPH J. BLASE

The study reported in this paper examines teachers' perspectives on ineffective school leadership. Unstructured and structured interviews, open‐ended questionnaires, and…

Abstract

The study reported in this paper examines teachers' perspectives on ineffective school leadership. Unstructured and structured interviews, open‐ended questionnaires, and observations were used to collect data from teachers in one urban high school in the southeastern United States. Data were collected and analyzed according to guidelines for grounded theory research. This paper describes factors teachers identified with ineffective school principals and the impact of these factors on the teachers and their relationships with other faculty, students, and parents. Theoretical ideas derived from the data are discussed. These ideas focus on relationships between school principal factors and the sociocultural context of the school.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1977

PAUL GOLDMAN and SUNDRA GREGORY

Teacher attitudes towards the implementation of SPECS, a planning‐programming‐budgeting system designed for schools, were measured for a three‐year period in River Park…

Abstract

Teacher attitudes towards the implementation of SPECS, a planning‐programming‐budgeting system designed for schools, were measured for a three‐year period in River Park School District. Researchers hypothesized that many teachers would resist SPECS since the paperwork required might detract from instructional time and detailed specification of their activities might threaten professional autonomy. Indeed, by the time data were analyzed, many dissatisfied teachers were actively organizing to suspend the use of SPECS. Results showed that supporters of SPECS among the teaching staff were few in number when compared to its critics, but that fully half the teachers surveyed were indifferent to the program. Over the three‐year period attitudes became slightly more negative towards SPECS. The most striking finding was the strong negative feeling in the high school and the strong positive feeling in the junior high. Differences in administrative effort and commitment and the development of structural effects within each school seem to explain part of this difference.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 2 April 2019

Ida Fatimawati Adi Badiozaman

The study explores how a novice English teacher’s motivation is sustained as she navigates a range of complex educational contexts in her teaching career. Through the lens…

Abstract

Purpose

The study explores how a novice English teacher’s motivation is sustained as she navigates a range of complex educational contexts in her teaching career. Through the lens of self-concept, the purpose of this paper is to gain an in-depth understanding of the role of this construct when navigating the challenges often faced in the early stages of the teaching profession.

Design/methodology/approach

In this case study, data were drawn primarily from a series of interviews with one English teacher over the course of three years. Teaching materials, together with teaching evaluations, were used to compare and validate the information obtained during the interview.

Findings

Despite the challenges faced in each new teaching context, the teacher’s motivation and commitment to the profession were driven and sustained by the high integration of personal goals with one’s self, goal fusion. Furthermore, an inherently strong drive to minimise the discrepancy between her current self and her ideal future self, helped the novice teacher navigate each new setting and its respective demands.

Practical implications

English teachers need specific support and professional development that goes beyond pre-service education into in-service training. It is important that continuous professional development be undertaken to allow opportunities for the conception of reflective practice and reflective practitioners.

Originality/value

Self-concept is not only a means of self-evaluation, but also a key driver for goal-relevant cognitions and behaviours effective for teaching practice.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2019

Guohua He, Ran An and Patricia Faison Hewlin

This paper aims to explore the psychological mechanism in the relationship between paternalistic leadership (PL) and employee well-being (EWB) in cross-cultural nonprofit…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the psychological mechanism in the relationship between paternalistic leadership (PL) and employee well-being (EWB) in cross-cultural nonprofit organizations. It also aims to further promote the integration of research on PL and self-concept by examining the relationship between PL and collective self-concept (CSC).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected on 72 supervisors and 233 expatriate Chinese teachers from 42 Confucius Institutes and 15 Confucius classrooms in Canada and the USA.

Findings

PL has a significant effect on EWB. Benevolent and moral leadership are positively related to CSC, while authoritarian leadership is negatively related to CSC. CSC mediates the relationship between PL and EWB. Furthermore, employees’ cross-cultural adaptability positively moderates the relationship between CSC and EWB; the indirect effect between PL and EWB via CSC is stronger for employees with stronger cross-cultural adaptability.

Originality/value

This is the first study that has examined the psychological mechanism under which PL affects EWB in cross-cultural nonprofit organizations. It contributes to the integration of research on PL and CSC by examining its relationship for the first time. It provides important implications for improving the well-being of expatriate employees in cross-cultural organizations.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this chapter is to critically analyse multiple stakeholders’ self-perceptions of the value, nature, success and impact of core Aboriginal Studies subjects in primary teacher education university courses.

Methodology

Participants were drawn from two universities in New South Wales which taught a core Aboriginal Studies subject as part of their primary teacher education degree. The methodology was informed by Yin’s (2003) multiple-case study replication design. This replication presents a picture of the perceptions and events which have impacted on the participants in the study.

Findings

The findings have important implications for theory, research and practice. The results of this study demonstrate that core Aboriginal Studies subjects in primary teacher education courses can make a positive difference in changing the perceptions of many pre-service teachers about Aboriginal people.

Research implications

The purpose of this study was to assemble an evidence-based rationale, which includes the voices of multiple stakeholders, to test the extent to which core Aboriginal Studies subjects in primary teacher education courses are vital to improving educational outcomes for Aboriginal children, advancing reconciliation and creating a more socially just Australian society.

Implications

Undertaking professional training through a core Aboriginal Studies subject builds pre-service teachersself-concepts, attitudes, commitment, knowledge and skills, and ability and understandings to teach Aboriginal Studies, incorporate Aboriginal perspectives and to be committed to effectively teaching Aboriginal students.

Social implications

The study supports the need for the inclusion of core Aboriginal Studies subjects in all universities with teacher education courses.

Originality/value of the paper

Research on Indigenous students has mostly adopted a deficiency model. In contrast, this study takes an explicitly positive perspective on Indigenous student success by focusing on the active psychological ingredients that facilitate successful learning.

Details

Seeding Success in Indigenous Australian Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-686-6

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2018

Ming Ming Chiu

The purpose of this paper is to test an ecological model of family, school and child links to reading outcomes in an extremely rich but developing country.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test an ecological model of family, school and child links to reading outcomes in an extremely rich but developing country.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a multi-level, plausible value analysis of item response model-estimated test scores and survey responses from 4,120 children and their parents’ survey responses in 166 schools in Qatar.

Findings

The results show that family attributes (socio-economic status (SES), books at home, parent reading attitude and reading activities) are linked to children’s superior reading attitudes, reading self-concept and reading test scores. In contrast, teacher attributes and teaching methods show no significant link to reading test scores. Also, Qatari children report a poor school climate linked to lower reading self-concept and lower reading test scores.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include parent reports rather than pre-tests, testing in only one domain, and cross-sectional data rather than longitudinal data.

Practical implications

As family support is strongly linked to children’s reading performance, the Qatari Government can explore early childhood interventions at home (e.g. more books at home, support parent-child reading activities, etc.), especially for families with lower SES. As teacher attributes and lesson activities were not linked to children’s reading outcomes, the Qatari Government can study this issue more closely to understand this surprising result.

Originality/value

This is the first study to test an ecological model of Qatar’s fourth-grade children’s reading scores with a representative sample.

Details

International Journal of Comparative Education and Development, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2396-7404

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2018

Tanju Deveci

Not all first-year university students possess the academic self-concept necessary for an effective transition from high school to university. This may impact their…

Abstract

Not all first-year university students possess the academic self-concept necessary for an effective transition from high school to university. This may impact their aptitude for learning so negatively that their engagement in lifelong learning (LLL), a prerequisite for success at and beyond university, may be limited. Therefore, the relationship between self-concept and LLL tendency is critical. This paper aims to describe this relationship among Arab first year university students. 149 students (77 males and 72 females) in two consecutive courses were involved in the study. Data were collected using two surveys, one on students’ self-concept, and another on their LLL tendency. Comparisons were made to determine whether gender and courses attended played a role in students’ academic self-concept and LLL tendency. The relationship between academic self-concept and LLL tendency was also analyzed. Results showed that students possessed a relatively high academic self-concept and that their LLL tendency scores were higher than the scale midpoint. The female students’ scores for academic effort (a sub-scale of self-concept), and for curiosity (a sub-scale of LLL), were comparatively higher than those for males. The courses attended did not make a significant difference in students’ perception of their academic self-concept; however, students in the second level course scored higher for self-regulation, a sub-scale of LLL, therefore receiving a slightly higher rating for LLL. Results also indicated a positive relationship between self-concept and LLL scores. The association between the academic effort and self-regulation domains of the scales was noteworthy. Recommendations are made to enhance students’ academic self-concept and LLL tendency, with an aim to strengthen the relationship between the two concepts.

ﻻ ﯾﻣﺗﻠ ك ﺟﻣﯾ ﻊ طﻼب اﻟ ﺳﻧﺔ ا ﻷوﻟ ﻰ ﻓ ﻲ اﻟ ﺟﺎ ﻣﻌﺔ ﻣﻔﮭوم اﻟذا ت ا ﻷﻛﺎدﯾﻣ ﻲ اﻟ ﺿ رور ي ﻟ ﻼﻧﺗﻘﺎ ل اﻟﻔﻌﺎ ل ﻣ ن اﻟ ﻣد رﺳﺔ اﻟﺛﺎﻧ وﯾﺔ إﻟ ﻰ اﻟ ﺟﺎ ﻣﻌﺔ. ﻗد ﯾؤ ﺛ ر ھذا ﻋﻠ ﻰ ا ﺳﺗ ﻌدا دھم ﻟﻠﺗ ﻌﻠ م ﺑ ﺷﻛ ل ﺳﻠﺑ ﻲ ﻟ د رﺟﺔ أ ن ﻣ ﺷﺎ رﻛﺗ ﮭم ﻓ ﻲ اﻟﺗ ﻌﻠ م ﻣد ى اﻟ ﺣﯾﺎة ) LLL (، وھ و ﺷرط أ ﺳﺎ ﺳﻲ ﻟﻠﻧ ﺟﺎ ح ﻓ ﻲ اﻟ ﺟﺎ ﻣﻌﺔ وﺧ ﺎ رﺟﮭﺎ، ﻗد ﯾ ﻛو ن ﻣ ﺣدودًا. وﻟ ذﻟ ك، ﻓﺈن اﻟ ﻌ ﻼ ﻗﺔ ﺑﯾ ن ﻣﻔﮭوم اﻟ ذا ت واﺗ ﺟ ﺎه LLL أﻣر ﺑﺎﻟ ﻎ ا ﻷھﻣﯾ ﺔ. ﺗ ﮭد ف ھذه اﻟ ورﻗﺔ إﻟ ﻰ و ﺻ ف ھذه اﻟﻌ ﻼ ﻗﺔ ﺑﯾ ن ط ﻼ ب اﻟﺟ ﺎ ﻣﻌﺎ ت اﻟﻌر ب ﻓﻲ اﻟﺳ ﻧ ﺔ ا ﻷ و ﻟ ﻰ . ﺷ ﺎ ر ك ﻓ ﻲ اﻟد ر ا ﺳ ﺔ 149 ط ﺎ ﻟ ﺑًﺎ ) 77 ﻣن اﻟذﻛور و 72 ﻣن اﻹ ﻧﺎ ث( ﻓ ﻲ دورﺗﯾ ن ﻣﺗ ﺗﺎﻟﯾﺗﯾ ن. ﺗم ﺟﻣﻊ اﻟﺑﯾﺎﻧﺎ ت ﺑﺎ ﺳﺗ ﺧدا م ﻣﺳ ﺣﯾن ، أﺣدھﻣﺎ ﻋن ﻣﻔ ﮭوم اﻟ ذا ت ﻟ د ى اﻟط ﻼ ب ، وا ﻵﺧر ﻋن اﺗ ﺟﺎه LLL . أ ﺟرﯾ ت ﻣﻘﺎ رﻧﺎ ت ﻟﺗ ﺣدﯾد ﻣ ﺎ إ ذ ا ﻛ ﺎ ن ا ﻟ ﺟ ﻧ د ر و ا ﻟ د و ر ا ت ا ﻟ ﺗ د ر ﯾ ﺑ ﯾ ﺔ ﻗ د ﻟ ﻌ ﺑ ت د و ر اً ﻓ ﻲ ﻣ ﻔ ﮭ و م ا ﻟ ط ﻼ ب ا ﻷ ﻛ ﺎ د ﯾ ﻣ ﻲ ا ﻟ ذ ا ﺗ ﻲ و ا ﺗ ﺟ ﺎ ه LLL . ﻛﻣﺎ ﺗم ﺗ ﺣﻠﯾ ل اﻟ ﻌ ﻼ ﻗﺔ ﺑﯾ ن ﻣﻔ ﮭوم اﻟذا ت ا ﻷ ﻛﺎ دﯾ ﻣ ﻲ و اﺗ ﺟ ﺎه LLL . أ ظ ﮭر ت اﻟﻧﺗﺎﺋ ﺞ أ ن اﻟ ط ﻼ ب ﯾ ﻣ ﺗ ﻠ ﻛ و ن ﻣ ﻔ ﮭ و ﻣً ﺎ ذ ا ﺗ ﯾًﺎ ﻋ ﺎ ﻟ ﯾًﺎ ﻧ ﺳ ﺑ ﯾًﺎ ، وأ ن د رﺟﺎ ت ﻣﯾﻠ ﮭم ﻟﻠﻐﺔ ا ﻹ ﻧ ﺟ ﻠﯾ ز ﯾ ﺔ ﻛﺎﻧ ت أﻋ ﻠ ﻰ ﻣ ن ﻣﻧﺗ ﺻ ف اﻟﻧ طﺎ ق. ﻛﺎﻧ ت ﻧﺗﺎﺋ ﺞ اﻟ طﻼب ا ﻹﻧﺎ ث ﻟﻠ ﺟﮭد ا ﻷﻛﺎدﯾ ﻣ ﻲ )ﻣﻘﯾﺎ س ﻓ رﻋﻲ ﻟ ﻣﻔﮭوم اﻟ ذا ت(، وﻓﺿ ول )ﻣﻘﯾﺎ س ﻓ رﻋﻲ ﻣ ن LLL (، أﻋ ﻠ ﻰ ﻧ ﺳﺑﯾﺎ ﻣ ن ﺗﻠ ك ﺑﺎﻟﻧ ﺳﺑ ﺔ ﻟﻠ ذﻛور. ﻟ م ﺗ ؤد اﻟ دورا ت اﻟﺗ ﻲ ﺣ ﺿ رو ھﺎ ﻓ رق ﻛﺑﯾ ر ﻓ ﻲ إ د را ك اﻟ طﻼب ﻟ ﻣﻔ ﮭوﻣﮭم اﻟ ذاﺗ ﻲ اﻷﻛﺎدﯾ ﻣ ﻲ؛ وﻣ ﻊ ذﻟك ، ﻓﺈن اﻟ ط ﻼ ب ﻓ ﻲ دورة اﻟ ﻣ ﺳ ﺗ و ى اﻟﺛﺎﻧ ﻲ ﺣ ﺻ ﻠ وا ﻋ ﻠ ﻰ د رﺟ ﺎ ت أ ﻋ ﻠ ﻰ ﻓ ﻲ اﻟﺗﻧ ظ ﯾم اﻟذاﺗ ﻲ ، وھ و ﻣﻘﯾﺎ س ﻓ رﻋﻲ ﻟـ LLL ، وﺑ ﺎﻟﺗﺎﻟ ﻲ ﺣ ﺻ ﻠ و ا ﻋ ﻠ ﻰ ﺗ ﺻ ﻧ ﯾ ف أ ﻋ ﻠ ﻰ ﻗ ﻠ ﯾ ﻼً ﻟ ﻠ ـ LLL . أ ﺷﺎ ر ت اﻟﻧﺗﺎﺋ ﺞ أﯾ ﺿ ﺎ إﻟ ﻰ وﺟود ﻋﻼ ﻗﺔ إﯾ ﺟﺎﺑﯾ ﺔ ﺿ ﻌﯾﻔﺔ ﺑﯾن ﻣﻔﮭوم اﻟذا ت وﻧﺗ ﺎﺋﺞ ا ل LLL . ﻛﺎ ن ا ﻻ ر ﺗ ﺑ ﺎ ط ﺑ ﯾ ن ا ﻟ ﺟ ﮭ د ا ﻷ ﻛ ﺎ د ﯾ ﻣ ﻲ و ﻣ ﺟ ﺎ ل ا ﻟ ﺗ ﻧ ظ ﯾ م ا ﻟ ذ ا ﺗ ﻲ ﻓ ﻲ ا ﻟ ﻣ ﻘ ﺎ ﯾ ﯾ س ﺟ د ﯾ رً ا ﺑ ﺎ ﻟ ﻣ ﻼ ﺣ ظ ﺔ . ﻟذ ا ﻧ و ﺻ ﻲ ﺑﺄ ھﻣﯾ ﺔ ﻟ ﺗﻧﻣﯾ ﺔ ﻣﻔ ﮭوم اﻟ طﻼب ا ﻷﻛﺎ دﯾ ﻣ ﻲ اﻟذاﺗ ﻲ و اﺗ ﺟ ﺎه ال LLL ، ﺑﮭ د ف ﺗﻌزﯾ ز اﻟ ﻌ ﻼﻗﺔ ﺑﯾ ن اﻟ ﻣﻔ ﮭوﻣﯾ ن.

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

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Book part
Publication date: 20 November 2013

Alexander Seeshing Yeung, Rhonda G. Craven, Ian Wilson, Jinnat Ali and Bingyi Li

Rural Australian patients continue to receive inadequate medical attention. One potential solution to this is to train Indigenous Australians to become medical doctors and…

Abstract

Purpose

Rural Australian patients continue to receive inadequate medical attention. One potential solution to this is to train Indigenous Australians to become medical doctors and return to their community to serve their people. The study aims to examine whether Indigenous medical students have a stronger intention to practice in underserved communities.

Methodology

A sample of Indigenous (N = 17) and non-Indigenous students (N = 188) from a medical program in Sydney was surveyed about their medical self-concept and motivation. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted, group differences were tested, and correlation patterns were examined.

Findings

CFA found seven distinct factors – three medical self-concepts (affective, cognitive, and cultural competence), one motivation factor, and three work-related variables – intention to serve underserved communities (intention), understanding of Indigenous health (understanding), and work-related anxiety (anxiety). Indigenous medical students were higher in cultural competence, intention, and understanding. Both the affective and cognitive components of medical self-concept were more highly correlated with intention and understanding for Indigenous students than for non-Indigenous students.

Research implications

It is important to examine medical students’ self-concepts as well as their cultural characteristics and strengths that seed success in promoting service to underserved Indigenous communities.

Practical implications

The findings show that Indigenous medical students tended to understand Indigenous health issues better and to be more willing to serve underserved Indigenous communities. By enhancing both the affective and cognitive components of medical self-concepts, the “home-grown” medical education program is more likely to produce medical doctors to serve underserved communities with a good understanding of Indigenous health.

Details

Seeding Success in Indigenous Australian Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-686-6

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2007

Serap Nazli

This paper has three objectives. The first is to determine the level of primary school students' career development, the second is to test Super's childhood years career…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper has three objectives. The first is to determine the level of primary school students' career development, the second is to test Super's childhood years career development model, and the third is to determine the level of Turkish children's career development.

Design/methodology/approach

Employing qualitative research models, 145 primary school students participated in structured essay questionnaires. A descriptional and content analysis, as well as a qualitative analysis, were performed on the data collected.

Findings

The study established that the primary school students possessed the nine concepts that Super developed for childhood years. It was also determined that there were no differences in the students' level of career development in terms of gender and grades.

Research limitations/implications

This study has two limitations. First, the study was carried out on a limited sample. Second, the data were gathered from the primary school students in a written form. Career development levels of students from different countries should be studied with qualitative and quantitative research, and then compared with each other.

Practical implications

Career education programs in the Turkish education system should start at the primary school years. Additionally, classroom teachers and school counsellors should promote experiences to support the students' career development, and parents should provide more conscientious support for their children.

Originality/value

This study provides support for Super's childhood years career development model in Turkey.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1994

Yin Cheong Cheng

Borrowing the ideas from the theories of adult organizations,investigates how teacher leadership style is related to use of power,social climate, student‐affective…

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5323

Abstract

Borrowing the ideas from the theories of adult organizations, investigates how teacher leadership style is related to use of power, social climate, student‐affective performance in a sample of 678 classrooms in 190 Hong Kong primary schools. Finds that class teacher′s leadership and use of power are interrelated in process of leading a class of students. Leadership style was found to be strongly related to social climate and student‐affective performance. The leadership style of “high initiating structure and high consideration” should be preferable and effective in terms of nearly all of the climate and affective measures. The findings support the importance of balanced leadership style not only in adults organizations, but also in classrooms. The profiles of the four leadership styles provide a useful pattern for developing teacher leadership as well as classroom environment for better students′ outcomes. The findings support the possibility of generalization of the concepts of organization and management that were developed from adults organizations to a context of classrooms in primary schools.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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