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Publication date: 9 December 2020

Amy Hageman and Cass Hausserman

This paper uses two studies to examine taxpayers' knowledge of tax incentives for charitable giving and also explores the consequences of this knowledge on charitable…

Abstract

This paper uses two studies to examine taxpayers' knowledge of tax incentives for charitable giving and also explores the consequences of this knowledge on charitable giving decisions. The first study surveys 600 US taxpayers to establish a baseline understanding of how making a charitable contribution affects taxpayers. In the second study, we conduct an experiment with 201 US taxpayers in which we manipulate the knowledge of taxpayers by providing an educational intervention; we also measure, if, how much is donated in a hypothetical scenario under various tax deductibility conditions. The first study indicates fewer than half of participants understand the basic principles of how charitable donations affect tax liability. Our second study reveals that a short educational video is extremely effective at improving taxpayers' understanding and helping them accurately estimate the tax benefit associated with charitable giving. However, through moderated mediation analysis, we also show that participants who received this educational intervention and accurately estimated the tax benefits in turn decreased their charitable giving. We conclude that the majority of US taxpayers do not understand whether they benefit from certain deductions and may be overestimating the benefit they receive from charitable giving, resulting in giving more than they intend.

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Article
Publication date: 6 January 2005

Amrizah Kamaluddin and Nero Madi

The central issue of this study is to gauge the general level of tax literacy among salaried taxpayers in Sabah and Sarawak. This study is undertaken to shed light on our…

Abstract

The central issue of this study is to gauge the general level of tax literacy among salaried taxpayers in Sabah and Sarawak. This study is undertaken to shed light on our preparedness to face the challenge posed by the implementation of Self Assessment System (SAS) on salaried taxpayers beginning from the year 2004 where taxpayers are expected to be functionally literate to compute their own tax liabilities accurately. For the purpose of this study, samples were randomly taken from salaried taxpayers working in the main cities in Sabah namely Sandaken, Tawau and Kota Kinabalu and Sarawak which were Kuching, Sibu, Bintulu and Miri. Statistical test using One‐Way ANOVA was applied on the mean tax literacy scores by place of work. Relationships between tax literacy scores and place of work were also analyzed by using the Chi‐square test of independence. Some of the findings, among others, indicated that salaried taxpayers in Sarawak were found to be more tax literate compared to their counterparts in Sabah. It was also discovered that the sector of employment is not an important factor of tax literacy. Public and corporate sector employees wee found to be equally literate as indicated by insignificant difference in the mean scores of these two sectors. Overall, it could be inferred that salaried taxpayers in both states are not prepared for SAS in 2004 as reflected by a low percentage of “very literate” category.

Details

Journal of Financial Reporting and Accounting, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1985-2517

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Abstract

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Library Hi Tech News, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2009

Anis Barieyah Mat Bahari and Lai Ming Ling

This study aims (i) to assess the quest for tax education among working adults that pursuing off‐campus non‐accounting program, (ii) to analyze the level of tax knowledge…

Abstract

This study aims (i) to assess the quest for tax education among working adults that pursuing off‐campus non‐accounting program, (ii) to analyze the level of tax knowledge among the working adults, (iii) to elicit the relevant tax topics to be taught should tax education be integrated into non‐accounting curriculum in higher education. We surveyed 450 working adults pursuing off‐campus non‐accounting program in one Malaysian public university. 190 usable responses were received. The survey found 64 per cent of the respondents were keen to learn taxation, and only 23.7 per cent of the respondents possessed high level of tax knowledge. The topics that they desired to learn the most are basic tax principles, personal taxation, tax planning for individuals and taxation for small business and company. The findings suggest that as we moved into the era of self‐assessment tax system, it is imperative for the accounting academics and the education authorities to seriously consider introducing tax education in non‐accounting curriculum in higher education.

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Journal of Financial Reporting and Accounting, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1985-2517

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Philmore Alleyne and Terry Harris

Tax evasion has been a major problem for governments around the world, with innovative and ever-changing schemes making the practice increasingly difficult to regulate. In…

Abstract

Purpose

Tax evasion has been a major problem for governments around the world, with innovative and ever-changing schemes making the practice increasingly difficult to regulate. In light of this, this study aims to use the extended version of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) (Beck and Ajzen, 1991) to predict individuals’ intentions to engage in tax evasion.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopts a two-stage approach for data collection and analysis. First, the authors obtained survey data from 150 taxpayers in Barbados to conduct multivariate analyses to test the validity of the study’s hypotheses. The authors also used several open-ended questions on the survey instrument to conduct thematic analyses to further explore the influence of the antecedents of intentions to engage in tax evasion. Second, the authors conducted a focus group with two tax officials and three tax advisors.

Findings

The authors find that attitudes toward the behaviour, perceived behavioural control and moral obligation are significant predictors of intentions to engage in tax evasion. Factors cited as encouraging tax evasion are perceived fairness, tax authorities’ institutional infrastructure and responses, potential financial benefit, perceptions of inequality, low level of trust in tax authorities, perceived poor use of tax revenues and poor treatment of taxpayers. Conversely, factors cited as discouraging tax evasion include fear of prosecution, high morals and potential adequate governmental regulation.

Research limitations/implications

The study measures intentions to engage in tax evasion rather than actual behaviour. The study does not measure social desirability bias.

Originality/value

This paper tests the applicability of variables used in the extended version of the TPB to predict intentions to engage in tax evasion in a Caribbean-based emerging economy. It also applies a mixed-methods approach of collecting data from taxpayers, tax advisors and tax officials.

Details

Journal of Financial Reporting and Accounting, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1985-2517

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 October 2019

Petros Lois, George Drogalas, Alkiviadis Karagiorgos and Aikaterini Chlorou

Governments count on tax revenues in order to finance their fiscal and social activities. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the citizens’ conception of tax

Abstract

Purpose

Governments count on tax revenues in order to finance their fiscal and social activities. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the citizens’ conception of tax compliance and examine the factors affecting tax behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

This survey was conducted through a stratified sample and questionnaires consisted of closed-ended questions. A linear regression and a series of reliability tests including an analysis of variance were conducted with IBM Statistical Package for Social Sciences.

Findings

The majority of the respondents demonstrate a positive perspective towards tax compliance and tax administration employees that inspire it. However, while the fairness of the tax system is evident, findings indicate a deeper issue of social and behavioural influences, including the characteristics of tax administrative employees and tax morality.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are subject to over- or sub-representation, since the sample derived from groups whose occupations feature strong tax compliance. The study was conducted in Greece, and it is possible that the results can be generalised to developing countries with similar economic environments and fiscal circumstances.

Practical implications

Non-economic factors affect tax behaviour and the formation of modern tax strategies. This survey enables governments to improve tax compliance rates and increase tax revenues. Fiscal depression tends to decrease state revenues. Tax compliance factors should be taken into account through tax decision-making processes and ensure efficient tax collection.

Originality/value

This paper furthers the existent literature and deepens in non-economic factors of morality, revealing tax behaviours instigated by reasons beyond tax unfairness.

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2018

Braam Lowies, Robert Brenton Whait, Christa Viljoen and Stanley McGreal

The purpose of this paper is to determine the profile of the typical online fractional residential property investor in Australia. This study also seeks to understand the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the profile of the typical online fractional residential property investor in Australia. This study also seeks to understand the motives for engaging with and investing in alternative residential property investments.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs a survey-based design via an online questionnaire to gather information on investor age, gender, type, education levels, time horizons and investment history and risk and return expectations. It also gathers information regarding investors’ financial literacy including tax implications of fractional property investment.

Findings

The findings of this study suggest amongst others, that fractional property investors tend to be younger, although the platform also attracts older investors including older females. The study also found that investors do not select alternative investment platforms in anticipation of super-normal investment returns. Return expectations are realistic and are based on a balance between capital growth and income.

Practical implications

This study indicates that alternative investment platforms lowers the barriers of entry into residential property for first time investors. It therefore creates opportunities to allow many first time individual investors to invest in property, often as an alternative to bank savings or investing in the stock market.

Originality/value

This study enhances our understanding of the influence of alternative investment platforms on investment decision-making. More specifically, it contrasts fractional property investment with more traditional investment opportunities to understand the motives of investors for diversifying into online investment vehicles.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Soumyananda Dinda

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between social capital and fiscal performance using provincial sub-national state-level data in India during…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between social capital and fiscal performance using provincial sub-national state-level data in India during 1991-2012. Fiscal performance in India is based on social trust on fiscal institutions that emphasizes mainly social need for economic development.

Design/methodology/approach

People participation in public affairs or simply vote turnover in general election in India is taken to measure social trust on fiscal institution. Applying principal component analysis, the author constructs social capital index and examines the said relation also. Models are estimated using panel data techniques.

Findings

Strong social capital reduces fiscal deficits. As one percent vote turnover rate rises, fiscal deficit reduces by 2.6-2.8 percent during 1991-2012. The empirical findings suggest that social capital indirectly controls the fiscal performance of the elected government. The results are robust to a number of control variables.

Originality/value

The strong political trust is established through high turnover rate and vote share in the election for formation of government that creates the platform for sound fiscal policy decisions.

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Attiya Waris and Laila Abdul Latif

The article aims to rely on the global wealth chains theory to study the effect of tax amnesty on anti-money laundering (AML) in Bangladesh. This theory is an analytical…

Abstract

Purpose

The article aims to rely on the global wealth chains theory to study the effect of tax amnesty on anti-money laundering (AML) in Bangladesh. This theory is an analytical framework intended to identify how wealth is repackaged and disguised to move it out of spheres of state oversight, regulation and taxation. It introduces the law on AML in Bangladesh, pointing out the revised Financial Action Task Force (FATF) recommendation that has expanded the scope of money laundering predicate offences to cover both indirect and direct tax crimes and smuggling in relation to customs and excise duties and taxes.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews in Bangladesh and desk research.

Findings

There are some gaps in the scope of the offence, the coverage of predicate offences and the types of property covered by the money laundering offence. There is also an absence of financial penalties available to effectively sanction legal persons. The current money laundering offences are derived from the ordinance issued in 2008 by the caretaker government (2006-2008). The current act contains detailed definitions of money laundering and property and a list of predicate offences and sanctions for the offence. However, there are some gaps in the physical elements of the offence, and the range of its predicate offences remains too narrow. Adding tax evasion to its list of predicate offences will, given the history of money laundering in Bangladesh, aid in combating illegal transfer of assets abroad and recovery of the same and abolish tax amnesty.

Originality/value

There is no paper that has analysed the linkages between money laundering and taxation in developing countries, especially Bangladesh.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

Sharon Yang

The purpose of this paper is to provide the findings of a survey of current technologies used in creating information literacy online tutorials in academic libraries. It…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide the findings of a survey of current technologies used in creating information literacy online tutorials in academic libraries. It also aims to inform readers of the technological tools available to develop good online tutorials.

Design/methodology/approach

The author surveys 372 online tutorials on the library web sites of 100 academic libraries in a random sample from Peterson's Guide to Four Year Colleges 2008.

Findings

About one‐third of the surveyed academic libraries have developed their own online tutorials. Most of the tutorials teach search skills for a specific database. The tutorial contents also include general introduction to library resources, research in a subject area, how‐to for an application, and library‐related concepts and procedures. One‐third of the tutorials have been created by tutorial software. The other technological approaches include portable document format (PDF), Hypertext Markup Language, Common Gateway Interface scripts, WebCT, Stream video, and MP3.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size may be too small to be conclusive. There may be correlation between the type and size of an academic institution, its information literacy programs, and the type and number of library online tutorials.

Originality/value

The value of such tutorials, what constitutes a good online tutorial, and pros and cons of each technology are discussed. The information in this paper is useful for anyone who is interested in current practice of online library instruction and options they have in their choice of technological tools for developing web‐based tutorials.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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