Search results

1 – 5 of 5
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Taufika Ophiyandri, Dilanthi Amaratunga and Kaushal Keraminiyage

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the advantages and limitations of the implementation of a community-based method in post-disaster housing reconstruction.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the advantages and limitations of the implementation of a community-based method in post-disaster housing reconstruction.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was based on multiple case studies in the implementation of a community-based post-disaster housing reconstruction project (CPHRP) in Indonesia. Data were gathered by conducting semi-structured interviews and a questionnaire survey.

Findings

The research reveals 22 advantages of a CPHRP. Four advantages can be categorised as highly significant. They are create sense of ownership, fit to local culture/customs/wisdom, build beneficiaries’ confidence and minimize corruption. There are some advantages that cannot be delivered if the housing reconstruction is conducted using a contractor-based approach. It was also found that psychological advantages are more dominant than the physical advantages. Despite its numerous advantages, CPHRP has limitations. First, it requires a long pre-construction process and, second, there is a limitation with regard to the capacity of implementer and there are limitations within the community itself.

Originality/value

This paper is very specific because it attempts to discover the advantages and limitations of a CPHRP.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 12 October 2020

Ruben Paul Borg, Glorianne Borg Axisa, Taufika Ophiyandri and Abdul Hakam

This paper aims to provide a framework for building resilience to coastal hazards with reference to Asian nations at the local, intra-regional and inter-regional levels…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a framework for building resilience to coastal hazards with reference to Asian nations at the local, intra-regional and inter-regional levels. This framework provides a roadmap that will enable higher education institutions in the region to play a significant role in educating and training new leaders for disaster risk reduction (DRR) and in working directly with local communities to implement plans.

Design/methodology/approach

Events such as the 2004 tsunami highlighted the transboundary nature of coastal hazard and the importance of regional cooperation. A framework for inter- and intra-regional cooperation was developed through focus groups organised with community participants in five Asian nations exposed to coastal risks: Sri Lanka, Maldives, Myanmar, Indonesia and the Philippines.

Findings

Different stakeholders assessed inter- and intra-regional cooperation at different levels as a means to provide a baseline scenario to develop a capacity-building roadmap for such cooperation. The discussions organised through structured face-to-face encounters considered cooperation at different scales: international, regional, national and local. The framework key areas were developed and included knowledge databases, data and resource sharing and exchange education programmes.

Originality/value

Multi-hazard early warning for more resilient coastal communities is increasingly complex in view of the discourse related to the wider economic and social environments. The research proposes a framework for inter- and intra-regional cooperation at different scales; from local to regional and to the inter-continental dimensions and even through a bottom-up approach, together with the experts’ and managing authorities’ top-down positions.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Bambang Istijono, Abdul Hakam and Taufika Ophiyandri

The purpose of this paper is to determine the potential landslide of Maninjau area.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the potential landslide of Maninjau area.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review and field investigation were undertaken to determine the potential landslide of Maninjau area. The field study includes the physical and mechanical properties of the soil in Maninjau area.

Findings

The Maninjau Lake area is very prone to landslides. Landslides in Maninjau may happen especially for slopes more than 40 per cent. The action plan must be done as well as the installation of the early warning equipment in the landslide-prone areas and re-plantation on critical ground.

Originality/value

The paper is very specific as it attempts to discover how prone Maninjau area is to landslides.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 12 July 2013

Taufika Ophiyandri, Dilanthi Amaratunga, Chaminda Pathirage and Kaushal Keraminiyage

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the critical success factors (CSFs) of community‐based post‐disaster housing reconstruction projects (CPHRP) during the…

Downloads
995

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the critical success factors (CSFs) of community‐based post‐disaster housing reconstruction projects (CPHRP) during the pre‐construction stage.

Design/methodology/approach

An extensive literature review and interviews were undertaken to establish selected factors contributing to the success of community‐based post disaster housing reconstruction projects. Following this, a questionnaire survey was administered to key stakeholders in order to perceive their view on CSFs of CPHRP. Data were analysed by deploying statistical software.

Findings

It was found that 12 factors are considered to be the CSFs: transparency and accountability, appropriate reconstruction policy/strategy, an understanding of the community‐based method, gathering trust from the community, facilitator capacity, good coordination and communication, sufficient funding availability, implementer capacity, having a significant level of community participation/control, government support, involvement of all community members, and successful beneficiary identification.

Practical implications

The establishment of CSFs in CPHRP helps key stakeholders to identify factors that must exist and go well during pre‐construction of CPHRP, in order to ensure the success of the programme.

Originality/value

The paper is very specific as it attempts to discover the CSFs of CPHRP during the pre‐construction stage.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Content available
Downloads
1834

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

1 – 5 of 5