Search results

1 – 10 of 87
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2001

Keith Blois, Rujirutana Mandhachitara and Tasman Smith

Retailing organizations in Bangkok range in type from the traditional through to the most modern. Also, while there are agglomerations of small stores selling similar…

Abstract

Retailing organizations in Bangkok range in type from the traditional through to the most modern. Also, while there are agglomerations of small stores selling similar ranges of goods, there are also some of the most up‐to‐date large shopping malls in the world. Although such agglomerations of retailing activity are not unique to Bangkok, Bangkok’s development is arguably unusual in three ways: the number of agglomerations continues to grow; these new agglomerations are dealing in a wide range of goods and not just electronic gadgets; and one particular agglomeration dominates the Bangkok market for its range of goods. A survey was carried out in 1999 of a sample of the stores in Pantip Plaza, a mall that is in an agglomeration. The results show the need to improve our understanding of the factors leading to agglomeration.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 29 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

Paul G. Patterson and Tasman Smith

This study examines for the first time, antecedents of relationship commitment in service industries in an Eastern cultural context. The study investigates the reasons for…

Abstract

This study examines for the first time, antecedents of relationship commitment in service industries in an Eastern cultural context. The study investigates the reasons for customers engaging in long‐term relational exchanges with service firms, as well as the impact of attractive alternatives and switching costs on such relationships. The sample comprised respondents in Bangkok, Thailand, who each completed a series of five questionnaires over a period of two weeks pertaining to their relational behaviour (technical service performance, social bonds and communication) with five predesignated service types. The results indicate that collectivist cultural norms impact the nature of relationships, and that antecedent variables have significantly different impacts across service types. Furthermore, switching costs were identified, which act as powerful inducements to stay in a service relationship. Management implications for relational strategies and future research implications of the findings are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

Paul G. Patterson and Tasman Smith

Because service encounters and service relationships are first and foremost social encounters, norms and expectations related to such encounters are likely to vary from…

Abstract

Because service encounters and service relationships are first and foremost social encounters, norms and expectations related to such encounters are likely to vary from culture to culture, but especially between high context Eastern, collectivist and low context, Western individualistic cultures. The purpose of this study was, in part, to replicate and then extend the work of Gwinner et al. in the USA, but this time in a Southeast Asian context. Gwinner et al.’s work examined the benefits customers perceive they receive from engaging in long‐term relationships with a variety of service‐providers. The current sample comprised 155 respondents in Bangkok, Thailand who each completed a series of questionnaires concerning their relational behavior with service suppliers. The results support the earlier study showing relational benefits can be categorized into three distinct benefit types. However, compared with the past research results in a Western context (USA), the results indicate some clearly discernible variations. It is apparent that we should not rely wholly on empirical research emanating from Western cultures, but also develop reliable models of how various marketing phenomena work in the rapidly expanding Asian economies.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 June 2013

Malcolm David Prentis

Guthrie Wilson (1914‐1984) was one example of the trend of migration of teachers from New Zealand public schools to Australian private schools. The purpose of this paper…

Abstract

Purpose

Guthrie Wilson (1914‐1984) was one example of the trend of migration of teachers from New Zealand public schools to Australian private schools. The purpose of this paper is to explore this particular case with a view to revealing some of the dynamics involved and challenges facing certain types of Australasian schools in the 1950s and 1960s.

Design/methodology/approach

This article is essentially founded on empirical historical research and on analysis of data from published and archival sources and from interviews with participants and observers. It is placed in the context of the literature on both educational change in Australasia and trans‐Tasman migration at the time.

Findings

Although Guthrie Wilson craved recognition as a novelist, he excelled as a school Principal, partly because he seemed to fit certain notions of education, leadership and manhood which suited the Council of The Scots College Sydney. In the 1960s, the Council wanted to maintain traditions which appeared to have been weakened by Wilson's progressive predecessor and challenged by social change. Though he fulfilled the Council's expectations, Wilson also proved to be a mediator between traditional and progressive education. Thus, Wilson could be both an honourable representative of the “Old School” and modestly progressive.

Originality/value

Biographical studies can reveal unsuspected patterns as well as challenge casual generalizations. Images of schools and of their leadership, held by both contemporaries and later observers, can prove to be subtly misleading on closer inspection. In particular, the article confronts a number of school myths which affect not only the schools involved but all schools, mutatis mutandis.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Abstract

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Rebecca Bednarek, Miguel Pina e Cunha, Jonathan Schad and Wendy Smith

Over the past decades, scholars advanced foundational insights about paradox in organization theory. In this double volume, we seek to expand upon these insights through…

Abstract

Over the past decades, scholars advanced foundational insights about paradox in organization theory. In this double volume, we seek to expand upon these insights through interdisciplinary theorizing. We do so for two reasons. First, we think that now is a moment to build on those foundations toward richer, more complex insights by learning from disciplines outside of organization theory. Second, as our world increasingly faces grand challenges, scholars turn to paradox theory. Yet as the challenges become more complex, authors turn to other disciplines to ensure the requisite complexity of our own theories. To advance these goals, we invited scholars with knowledge in paradox theory to explore how these ideas could be expanded by outside disciplines. This provides a both/and opportunity for paradox theory: both learning from outside disciplines beyond existing boundaries and enriching our insights in organization scholarship. The result is an impressive collection of papers about paradox theory that draws from four outside realms – the realm of belief, the realm of physical systems, the realm of social structures, and the realm of expression. In this introduction, we expand on why paradox theory is ripe for interdisciplinary theorizing, explore the benefits of doing so, and introduce the papers in this double volume.

Details

Interdisciplinary Dialogues on Organizational Paradox: Learning from Belief and Science, Part A
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-184-7

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

Lynn Godkin and Seth Allcorn

This paper describes how Avoidant Organization Disorder, a common form of narcissism, thwarts organizational health and performance. Avoidant Organization Disorder is…

Abstract

This paper describes how Avoidant Organization Disorder, a common form of narcissism, thwarts organizational health and performance. Avoidant Organization Disorder is juxtaposed with interruptions in organizational learning. A model illustrating the possible relationship between the two and how Avoidant Organization Disorder may precipitate interruptions in organization learning is presented.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 October 2010

Kay Whitehead and Kay Morris Matthews

In this article we focus on two women, Catherine Francis (1836‐1916) and Dorothy Dolling (1897‐ 1967), whose lives traversed England, New Zealand and South Australia. At…

Abstract

In this article we focus on two women, Catherine Francis (1836‐1916) and Dorothy Dolling (1897‐ 1967), whose lives traversed England, New Zealand and South Australia. At the beginning of this period the British Empire was expanding and New Zealand and South Australia had much in common. They were white settler societies, that is ‘forms of colonial society which had displaced indigenous peoples from their land’. We have organised the article chronologically so the first section commences with Catherine’s birth in England and early life in South Australia, where she mostly inhabited the world of the young ladies school, a transnational phenomenon. The next section investigates her career in New Zealand from 1878 where she led the Mount Cook Infant’s School in Wellington and became one of the colony’s first renowned women principals. We turn to Dorothy Dolling in the third section, describing her childhood and work as a university student and tutor in New Zealand and England. The final section of our article focuses on the ways in which both women have been represented in the national memories of Australia and New Zealand. In so doing, we show that understandings about nationhood are also transnational, and that writing about Francis and Dolling reflects the shifting relationships between the three countries in the twentieth century.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Jed Donoghue and Bruce Tranter

Abstract

Details

Exploring Australian National Identity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-503-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Jay Sankaran

It is well known that within an economic region, shippers’ practice of logistics is shaped significantly by various factors, such as transportation regulation. The precise…

Abstract

It is well known that within an economic region, shippers’ practice of logistics is shaped significantly by various factors, such as transportation regulation. The precise purpose of this paper is to describe these factors and their influence on logistics practice in the New Zealand context. Discusses the various modes of domestic freight transport, as well as the deregulation and privatization of the transportation sector of the New Zealand economy. Also examines international shipping and airfreight in the context of New Zealand’s foreign trade. Identifies three sets of contextual factors (structural, regulatory, and developmental) that, in the New Zealand situation, shape shippers’ practice of freight logistics.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

1 – 10 of 87