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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2013

Chiao-Chen Chang

This research aims to integrate the unified theory of acceptance and usage of technology (UTAUT) with task technology fit to explain users' behavioral intention of using…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to integrate the unified theory of acceptance and usage of technology (UTAUT) with task technology fit to explain users' behavioral intention of using library mobile applications in university libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

By integrating the unified theory of acceptance and usage of technology (UTAUT) and the moderator of task-technology fit, this research proposes a library mobile applications usage intention model. The study data come from a convenience sample of 363 undergraduate and graduate students. A structural equation modelling (SEM) technique was conducted to identify causal relationships.

Findings

Results showed that the UTAUT model fits the data well. The empirical data reveal that performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence, and facilitating conditions determine users' behavioral intention of using library mobile applications. As a determinant in the UTAUT model, the moderating effect of task-technology fit is also significant. Moreover, individuals with different levels of task-technology fit will strengthen or weaken the relationships of determinants in the intention to use library mobile applications in university libraries.

Research limitations/implications

This study addresses self-reported behavioral intentions as part of the survey; as a result, the data may have introduced inaccuracies. The implications of the proposed library mobile applications success model are discussed.

Practical implications

University librarians should reinforce the efficiency of library mobile applications to influence users' willingness to use such applications.

Originality/value

This study combines both the constructs of the UTAUT model and task-technology fit to consider intentions to use library mobile applications in university libraries.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2019

Naser Valaei, S.R. Nikhashemi, Gregory Bressolles and Hwang Ha Jin

The purpose of this paper is to examine (a)symmetric features of task-technology-performance characteristics that are most relevant to fit, satisfaction and continuance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine (a)symmetric features of task-technology-performance characteristics that are most relevant to fit, satisfaction and continuance intention of using apps in mobile banking transactions.

Design/methodology/approach

Exploratory factor analysis was used with maximum likelihood extraction and Varimax rotation on a separate sample of 183 mobile banking apps users prior to the main data collection. The theoretical model was tested applying a factor-based structural equation modelling approach to a sample of 250 experienced mobile banking apps users.

Findings

The study unveiled that the task and performance characteristics are more relevant compared to technology characteristics when doing transactions via apps. In addition, the findings uncovered that user satisfaction and continuous intention to use apps stem from the degree of fit in online transactions. The findings of moderation analysis highlighted that users in the lower income group are more concerned about the performance characteristics of banking apps, and there are no differences across age and gender groups. Surprisingly, technology characteristic has a nonlinear nature and this study shows potential boundary conditions of technology characteristics in degree of fit, user satisfaction and continuance intention to use apps.

Practical implications

Findings from the conditional probabilistic queries reveal that with 83.3 per cent of probability, user satisfaction is high when using apps for banking transactions, if the levels of fit, task, performance and technology characteristics are high. Furthermore, with 72 per cent of probability, continuance intention to use apps is high, if the levels of performance and task characteristics are high.

Originality/value

Contributing to task-technology fit theory, this study shows that performance characteristics need to be aligned with task and technology characteristics in order to have better fit when using apps for online banking transactions.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2019

Jindi Fu, Rong-An Shang, Anand Jeyaraj, Yuan Sun and Feng Hu

Enterprise social media (ESM) usage has gained considerable momentum within organizations. The purpose of this paper is to seek a better understanding of ESM usage based…

Abstract

Purpose

Enterprise social media (ESM) usage has gained considerable momentum within organizations. The purpose of this paper is to seek a better understanding of ESM usage based on the task environments and the technology affordances of ESM.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on a survey consisting of 556 usable responses. Regression methods are applied to analyze the data.

Findings

This study finds strong support for the positive impact of task-technology fit on ESM usage. Considering separately, task equivocality had no impact; task interdependence had a negative effect on ESM usage; bridging social capital had a positive effect; and bonding social capital had a marginal impact on ESM usage.

Research limitations/implications

This research incorporated social capital into discussions of task-technology fit. A 2×2 matrix based on task equivocality and task interdependence was developed, which may be extended to other contexts or technologies.

Practical implications

ESM implementation should account for both task environments and the appropriate technology affordances. Individuals access bridging social capital to a greater extent than bonding social capital using ESM, and they do not use ESM when the task environments alone are considered.

Originality/value

This is an original study that considers task environments and technology affordances in the context of ESM usage. The findings offer valuable and timely contributions to both scholars and practitioners.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Silvia Ratna, Endang Siti Astuti, Hamidah Nayati Utami, Kusdi Rahardjo and Zainul Arifin

This study aims to examine the effect of task and technology characteristics on the compatibility of technology and tasks, as well as examine the reciprocal effect between…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the effect of task and technology characteristics on the compatibility of technology and tasks, as well as examine the reciprocal effect between the task-technology fit and the use of information systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The study took place in 36 star hotels from one-star to four-star hotels in some cities and districts in South Kalimantan Province. There were 24 hotels in Banjarmasin, 7 hotels in Banjarbaru and 1 hotel in each area of Banjar, Tanah Bumbu, Tabalong, Hulu Sungai Utara and Barito Kuala. The hotels chosen were those implemented the information and communication technology as supporting administrative activities to serve hotel customers. The population was the front office staff in the existing hotels as the users of the information technology. The sampling technique used in this research was the questionnaire distribution in accordance with the number of population. Data were collected from the filled questionnaires. From the 239distributed questionnaires, 164 (68.62 per cent) were returned and used as the research data.

Findings

Task characteristics and technology characteristics have a significant and positive effect on task-technology fit, in which the higher the task characteristics and technology characteristics, the higher the task-technology fit. The task-technology fit and the use of information systems are positive and reciprocal. This means that the higher the task-technology fit, the higher the use of information systems.

Originality/value

The originality of this study is reciprocal relationship between the variables of use with the task-technology fit. Some researchers have found the compatibility of technological tasks affecting the use of information systems, namely, Lin and Huang (2008), Norzaidi and Salwani (2009), Larsen et al. (2009), McGill and Klobas (2009), D’Ambra and Wilson (2013), Im (2014) and Chang et al. (2015). On the other hand, in task-technology fit theory, Goodhue and Thompson (1995) state that use affects the task-technology fit.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Nitaya Wongpinunwatana, Colin Ferguson and Paul Bowen

The primary objective of this research is to investigate the impact of task‐technology fit on users’ performance when using artificial intelligence systems for auditing…

Abstract

The primary objective of this research is to investigate the impact of task‐technology fit on users’ performance when using artificial intelligence systems for auditing tasks. Four artificial intelligence auditing systems, two problem‐solving programs, and four questionnaires were developed. A laboratory experiment was performed with 292 undergraduate auditing students. The results suggested that the effect of task‐technology fit on accuracy in solving problems was marginal for case‐based reasoning with unstructured tasks. No significant effect was found on problem‐solving accuracy for rule‐based reasoning with structured tasks. The task‐technology fit, however, marginally increased users’ certainty of the correctness of their solutions.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2009

Mohd Daud Norzaidi and Mohamed Intan Salwani

Using the extended task‐technology fit (TTF) model, this paper aims to examine technology resistance, technology satisfaction and internet usage on students' performance.

Abstract

Purpose

Using the extended task‐technology fit (TTF) model, this paper aims to examine technology resistance, technology satisfaction and internet usage on students' performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted at Universiti Teknologi MARA, Johor, Malaysia and questionnaires were distributed to 354 undergraduate students.

Findings

The structural equation modelling (SEM) results indicate that technology satisfaction and the internet usage significantly explains the variance on students' performance. Task‐technology fit is not a predictor of technology resistance but it does predict the internet usage. The internet usage has greater impact on technology satisfaction than technology satisfaction on the internet usage. Finally, technology resistance is not a predictor of students' performance.

Research limitations/implications

The study focuses only on education in Malaysia and concentrates only on the students' performance and the relationship between technology resistance, technology satisfaction and the internet usage.

Practical implications

The results provide insights on how Malaysian education systems of a similar structure could improve upon their internet adoption.

Originality/value

This study is perhaps one of the first to address internet adoption in education using an extended task‐technology fit model (task‐technology fit, internet usage, technology resistance, technology satisfaction) to investigate their influences on students' performance.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2021

Yun-Fang Tu, Gwo-Jen Hwang, Joyce Chao-Chen Chen and Chiulin Lai

This study aims to investigate the influences of task-technology fit on university students’ attitudes towards ubiquitous library-supported learning when they use a mobile…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the influences of task-technology fit on university students’ attitudes towards ubiquitous library-supported learning when they use a mobile library app, Line@Library.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, structural equation modelling to examine 158 valid questionnaires are used. The study aims to examine the effects of task-technology fit (TTF) on university students’ attitudes towards mobile learning (AML) when using Line@Library.

Findings

The results show that task-technology fit is an important role that influences the students’ attitudes towards mobile learning. The factor “technology characteristics” is considered when the students attempted to use the mobile app to solve problems or complete tasks. This study also found that the students responded with positive perceptions of the task-technology fit and had positive perceptions of its ease of use. Furthermore, usefulness, ease of use and affection of AML were found to be the most influential predictors of mobile library adoption intention.

Originality/value

From the perspective of learners, this study investigates the relationships of the combination of social media and a mobile library between TTF and AML. This study further found that not only ease of use, usefulness and affection but also task-technology fit can be a predictor that influences students’ attitudes towards mobile learning.

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Hee-Woong Kim, Hock Chuan Chan and Sumeet Gupta

The purpose of this paper is to : first, examine information systems (IS) infusion from a user commitment perspective, and second, examine the formation of user commitment…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to : first, examine information systems (IS) infusion from a user commitment perspective, and second, examine the formation of user commitment toward the use of IS in terms of job design.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts a survey approach with structural equation modeling to test the developed research model and hypotheses.

Findings

A survey of 236 enterprise system users shows that user commitment has a positive effect on IS infusion. User commitment, in turn, is influenced by task technology fit, technology self-efficacy, and task autonomy. Further mediation and direct effects to IS infusion are explored.

Research limitations/implications

This study offers implications for research, such as explaining a driver of IS infusion; and extending commitment theory by finding antecedents of user commitment.

Practical/implications

The results of this study offer suggestions to management on how to improve IS infusion in terms of user commitment and, consequently, how to develop user commitment based on the socio-technical system (STS) design.

Social/implications

The study highlights the critical impact of technology autonomy on IS infusion. An individual user’s authority in using and regulating the system is required for IS infusion.

Originality/value

This study has proposed a theoretical model of IS infusion based on commitment and socio-technical job design factors.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

ChienHsing Wu, Shu-Chen Kao and Chia-Hung Shih

This paper aims to examine the role of the creation task–technology fit (CTTF) in the knowledge creation performance (KCP). The creation task features represented by…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the role of the creation task–technology fit (CTTF) in the knowledge creation performance (KCP). The creation task features represented by goal-driven, goal-free and goal-frame modes (GDM, GFM and GRM) and information and communication technology (ICT) supportive features are considered. The moderation effect of cognitive style represented by analytical and intuitive styles is explored. Contributions and implications are addressed.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature review on creation task, ICT, cognitive behavior and fit theory, and the research gap with respect to the antecedents of KCP are presented. The research arguments are then hypothesized and the research model developed to describe that the proposed role is examined empirically.

Findings

Research findings are obtained on the basis of the data analysis of 258 valid subjects from research institutes as well as manufacturing and service industries. The effect of CTTF on creation outcomes is significantly confirmed. The ICT supportive functions are unlikely significantly related to CTTF for the analysis-styled group, but the intuition-styled group shows a likely significance because of the different means of dealing with information and knowledge processing. The analysis-styled group disagrees with the significant link of the GDM with CTTF, whereas the intuition-styled group presents the significant effects of GDM, GFM and GRM on CTTF.

Originality/value

The unique features of knowledge creation differentiate it from other tasks. With respect to whether the knowledge creation task presented by goal is defined or not, and how ICT better suits the creation task features to benefit the creation outcomes are yet to be discussed. The individual cognitive style is confirmed to alternate the effect of ICT and GDM on CTTF in the proposed model. The research findings are particularly obvious because a transition gap, less covered by the literature, might exist with regard to the perception connection of knowledge creation service providers, agencies, consultants and context creators.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

John D'Ambra and Concepción S. Wilson

The performance of the World Wide Web is evaluated as an information resource in a specific information domain. The theoretical framework underpinning this approach…

Abstract

The performance of the World Wide Web is evaluated as an information resource in a specific information domain. The theoretical framework underpinning this approach recognises the contribution of information‐seeking behaviour from the discipline of information science and models of information systems success from the discipline of information systems in explaining World Wide Web usage as an information resource. A model integrating the construct of uncertainty and the task‐technology fit model is presented. A questionnaire‐based empirical study is used to test this integrated approach. Our results confirm that richer models representing the broad context of World Wide Web usage are required to evaluate usage of the World Wide Web as an information resource. Usage for travel tasks, uncertainty reduction, the Web as an information resource, and mediation all have a significant impact on users' perception of performance, explaining 46 per cent of the variance.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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