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Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 4 May 2018

Saifullah and Syamsuddin

Purpose – This study aims to examine how the task-based learning model influences the motivation of students of the Social and Political Sciences (FISIP) Department at…

Abstract

Purpose – This study aims to examine how the task-based learning model influences the motivation of students of the Social and Political Sciences (FISIP) Department at Universitas Malikussaleh in learning English. Also, the present study attempts to find out the effectiveness of the implementation of this model in the English class as well as assess their attitudes toward the use of the model. This research involved 35 students of the first semester who were doing the English-I course.

Design/Methodology/Approach – This research combined a qualitative and quantitative approach with a direct application procedure through experimental study. The data were collected through a test, questionnaire, and interview.

Findings – The result shows that the task-based learning model helps non-English students to improve their English proficiency which in turn increases their motivation to learn English and therefore their attitudes toward using this model in their classroom is positively seen as a better way to learn English.

Research Limitations/Implications – Unlike many findings on similar studies, this research found that motivation cannot be utilized to predict grades in the peripheral university. New approaches should be developed to find out the predictors for student grades.

Practical Implications – To understand the influencing aspects for students’ grades attainment, more variables should be used. Both internal and external motivation factors failed to predict students’ grades.

Originality/Value – Research on students learning motivation specifically at the peripheral university has been studied.

Details

Proceedings of MICoMS 2017
Type: Book
ISBN:

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2019

Pattanee Susomrith and Alan Coetzer

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationships between task-based and interactional informal learning practices in small professional services firms and the…

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1010

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationships between task-based and interactional informal learning practices in small professional services firms and the moderating role of proactivity in the relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Job demand-resources theory was used to develop theoretical arguments for a link between informal learning and work engagement. Data were collected from 203 employees in professional services firms and analysed using structural equation modelling.

Findings

Analysis of the data showed that opportunities to learn through task-based learning processes and through interactions with supervisors and colleagues were positively related to employees’ levels of work engagement. Furthermore, the strength of relationships between these informal learning practices and work engagement was influenced by employees’ proactivity.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations pertain to the non-random sampling procedure, cross-sectional nature of the study and the use of self-report measures. These limitations were mitigated by employing rigorous analytical procedures.

Practical implications

The results suggest that managers are able to influence the quantity and quality of informal workplace learning through strategies such as selecting employees who have a propensity for proactive behaviour, encouraging proactive behaviour, enabling experimentation and reflection and fostering positive interpersonal relations.

Originality/value

The study links two streams of research that have seemingly not been connected previously. The results suggest that small firms are sites with abundant potential for development of employees’ knowledge and skills and the associated experiences of work engagement.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 48 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2012

Jessie Grace U. Rubrico

Contextualizing grammar in second language (L2) classrooms implies making grammar constructs relevant to the learners’ world; affording learners the opportunities to…

Abstract

Contextualizing grammar in second language (L2) classrooms implies making grammar constructs relevant to the learners’ world; affording learners the opportunities to better comprehend and apply these concepts in their own milieus. This instructional design (ID) has been devised to contextualize grammar and to explore learner engagement of pre-service English teachers through Computer-Aided Learning (CAL) and Task-based Learning (TBL) in a technology-driven learning environment. CAL encompasses technology-aided discussions, multi-media presentations, online tests and exercises, and social media deployment. TBL, on the other hand, contextualizes grammar using technology and social network in planning, executing, and presenting four assigned tasks: picture essay, brochure design, dialogue composition, and comic strips illustration. Facebook is the e-portfolio of the class, archiving all group and individual output. The CAL-TBL tandem is propelled by group initiatives and class collaboration evident in group discussions and planning, microteaching, task presentations, peer reviews, and self-evaluations. These initiatives engage learners; empowering students to collaboratively take active part and responsibility for their own learning. The three-hour-class meets every week in a computer laboratory. The post-semester feedback and online poll course design review as well as the University Course Evaluation comments have shown that the ID, from the learners’ perspective, is effective in contextualizing grammar and in engaging learners.

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Increasing Student Engagement and Retention Using Social Technologies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-239-4

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Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2012

Laura A. Wankel and Patrick Blessinger

This book centers on several key areas of social engagement and social learning in higher education today, including social networking platforms and e-portfolios. In…

Abstract

This book centers on several key areas of social engagement and social learning in higher education today, including social networking platforms and e-portfolios. In addition to these Web 2.0 technologies, rapid improvements in related communication technologies (e.g., broadband services, wireless, mobile phones, and tablets) have also provided the necessary infrastructure components by which educators implement innovative teaching and learning practices on a larger scale, in a more reliable manner, and in a more targeted fashion. These technologies are also transforming our views of what it means to learn in an increasingly globalized, interconnected, and pluralistic world. The authors have presented several perspectives on how to use social networking tools to better engage learners in more meaningful and authentic learning activities. Social networking sites like Facebook are not a panacea for effective learning, but they do provide instructors and students with a convenient platform for enhancing the teaching and learning process. Instructors also play an important part in modeling proper online behavior through their presence on the platform and their interaction with their students. However, these tools are only one piece of the learning puzzle. The ultimate goal is to enable students to become lifelong learners and to instill in them a high value for learning that matures over their lifetime. As such, these tools can be used to better engage students more deeply in authentic and personally meaningful learning experiences.

Contextualizing grammar in second language (L2) classrooms implies making grammar constructs relevant to the learners’ world; affording learners the opportunities to better comprehend and apply these concepts in their own milieus. This instructional design (ID) has been devised to contextualize grammar and to explore learner engagement of pre-service English teachers through Computer-Aided Learning (CAL) and Task-based Learning (TBL) in a technology-driven learning environment. CAL encompasses technology-aided discussions, multi-media presentations, online tests and exercises, and social media deployment. TBL, on the other hand, contextualizes grammar using technology and social network in planning, executing, and presenting four assigned tasks: picture essay, brochure design, dialogue composition, and comic strips illustration. Facebook is the e-portfolio of the class, archiving all group and individual output. The CAL-TBL tandem is propelled by group initiatives and class collaboration evident in group discussions and planning, microteaching, task presentations, peer reviews, and self-evaluations. These initiatives engage learners; empowering students to collaboratively take active part and responsibility for their own learning. The three-hour-class meets every week in a computer laboratory. The post-semester feedback and online poll course design review as well as the University Course Evaluation comments have shown that the ID, from the learners’ perspective, is effective in contextualizing grammar and in engaging learners.

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2008

Neil Lasher

The purpose of this paper is to outline an updated, six‐point model for instructional design which takes account of modern delivery trends in learning, such as informal

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1578

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline an updated, six‐point model for instructional design which takes account of modern delivery trends in learning, such as informal and workflow e‐learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The model is based on empirical research carried out over at least 20 years.

Findings

The paper finds that to adhere to the modern goal of aligning learning with business strategy, we need to predict the needs of the user and select the most useful content and delivery techniques. Until now, the instructional design model for informal and workflow e‐learning did not exist. Learners must be engaged by the learning programme/materials they are using. Learning modules should be narrowly focused to a single learning point. The learning content must be up‐to‐date and always retrievable. Learners must be motivated to use the new information they are being given via the learning materials. The effectiveness of learning materials is enhanced by the designer finding and exploiting something in the piece of learning that is significant to the learners and will affect them emotionally. Learners organise what they know through meaning and association; so, to get people to learn, we have to entice them – via building associations from what they know now to what we are going to teach them. Informal learning modules and workflow learning techniques do not always require delivery via a learning management system. Speed of access to learning materials is now an issue for users.

Originality/value

This paper explores a new – and augmented – model of instructional design which applies particularly to the design of e‐learning materials (which were unknown to the “key” instructional design gurus).

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 40 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2021

Ilse Maria Beuren, Vanderlei dos Santos and Daniele Cristina Bernd

This study aims to empirically examine the effects of using the management control system (MCS) on individual performance mediated by organizational learning

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to empirically examine the effects of using the management control system (MCS) on individual performance mediated by organizational learning. Complementarily, it evaluates the moderating effect of feedforward on the relationship between MCS use and organizational learning.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modeling and mediation and moderation analyses were used in a sample of 194 managers from Brazilian companies listed in the Exame Magazine’s “Best and Biggest” ranking.

Findings

The results reveal that using the MCS from a cybernetic perspective contributes to organizational learning, contradicting theoretical arguments and empirical evidence that this hinders learning and that feedforward can strengthen this relationship, as long as it is in line with the way of using the MCS. A mediating effect of organizational learning on the relationship between MCS use and individual performance has also been confirmed.

Practical implications

The results demonstrate the effects of MCS use on individual performance and organizational learning by taking a taxonomy of cybernetic use and comprehensive MCS use as a basis. The results provide insights to managers by revealing that MCS use not only influences task performance through organizational learning but also tends to generate cooperative, persistent and initiative-taking behaviors.

Originality/value

The study provides an approach to the behavioral consequences of using the MCS (score-keeping use and comprehensive MCS use) and the role of specific cognitive and motivational mechanisms in individual performance from a multidimensional perspective (task-based, contextual and general).

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2008

Mikko Tanni and Eero Sormunen

This paper aims to give a critical review of the empirical information seeking and retrieval (IS&R) literature focusing on learning related information behavior. It also…

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2260

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to give a critical review of the empirical information seeking and retrieval (IS&R) literature focusing on learning related information behavior. It also aims to propose the task‐based approach to link research on learning and information behavior in learning tasks and to organize and interpret the literature.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper takes the form of a critical literature review.

Findings

Researchers have identified patterns of information behavior and variations in the conceptions of seeking and using information for learning tasks. The results are fragmented and a framework should be developed to guide further research. Learners' information behavior in learning tasks may be attributable to various explanatory factors, which have not been taken into account in any single study. The concept of focus formulation appears to link information seeking and learning. The role of the writing process in learners' information behavior and the characteristics of the resulting documents have received least attention in the research field.

Research limitations/implications

The review emphasizes task‐based IS&R literature. Learning research may shed more light on specific questions.

Practical implications

The paper may help teachers in designing learning tasks.

Originality/value

The paper provides a synthesis of recent studies on information behavior in learning tasks and identifies new paths for further research.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 64 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 29 June 2021

Thi Hong Le Vo

This paper aims to provide evidence that online well-designed educational tasks can provide more relevant and richer active learning environment for business English…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide evidence that online well-designed educational tasks can provide more relevant and richer active learning environment for business English learners. The benefits of online tasks, as an education tool, became more apparent and gained more importance during the events related to the Covid-19 pandemic. The task design is based on task-based interactions and in a sequence of tasks with the support of an online learning management system (LMS). The findings suggest that online task-based learning (and would-be blended learning in the future) enables meaningful and authentic activities promoting interactions and communicative competences to prepare for learners of business English to enter the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

The overarching aim of the study is to explore how task-design-utilizing online LMS could contribute to enhancing the learning process and to the development of the learner's communicative competences. The study included two aspects, namely: (1) the design of online tasks and (2) pilot evaluation. The task design involved tasks that required interactions between the learners. The pilot evaluation relied on data collection via questionnaires.

Findings

Two aspects relating to the findings: (1) a description of the teaching initiatives which was designed to see how blended learning and online tasks can enhance learning and develop the skills of the learners: with questioning techniques targeting communication skills, simulated workplace situations and timely feedback and peer influence; (2) the findings of the pilot study evaluation to see the actual implementation of online tasks. The students' responses corroborate the teachers' comments. The findings of this research showed that LMS tasks, which were designed for this study, helped the learners to enhance their competence in business English. Such competences included communicative skills needed for learners to enter the workplace such as interpersonal skills, presentation skills and negotiation skills in contexts. These findings lead to significant recommendations regarding the way forward for developing active blended learning.

Research limitations/implications

Firstly, teachers need to be trained and involved in designing such online tasks and materials to be used in active blended learning. More training in language teaching methodologies should be investigated to adapt the transition from a traditional to a computer-assisted language learning teacher. This helps teachers to design and implement online simulated workplace tasks. Secondly, time for the use of online tasks should be allocated satisfactorily. This can be achieved by building online learning sessions into class schedule or developing active blended courses. The time for the use of online simulated tasks should be allocated satisfactorily with lab or simulation room, in which students would be shown how to access the online tasks designed on the university LMS and the way to practice with different kinds of tasks.

Originality/value

In this study context, the online tasks design can initiate at activity-level blending to support face-to-face (F2F) activities, for example, online activities to support tasks for the topic Make a request or Offer for help. This can be extended to course-level blending when more online activities are designed to use with F2F activities such as online comparing and contrasting tasks to develop skills in connections with the awareness of cultures. The findings of the research suggest to develop and to implement online tasks alongside with classroom learning and teaching to enable the objectives of business English programme at university for preparing learners to enter the workplace. The recent pandemic highlighted the need for effective methodologies for active blended learning. It is now required that professionals in higher education to collect evidence base to inform future practice of such methodologies. Further significant research efforts should be directed towards collecting such evidence of the effectiveness and improvements of such methods. The support of higher education management professionals in securing funding for such research will be essential.

Details

Journal of Asian Business and Economic Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2515-964X

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Book part
Publication date: 5 December 2014

Catherine Franc and Annie Morton

We have been applying inquiry-based learning (IBL) methodologies to language teaching in the department of French studies at the University of Manchester (UK) since 2006…

Abstract

We have been applying inquiry-based learning (IBL) methodologies to language teaching in the department of French studies at the University of Manchester (UK) since 2006. We were aware that IBL was successfully employed within scientific subjects such as medicine and dentistry, but little research had been carried out within higher education in the adoption of such methodologies in advanced level language learning. Our projects in grammar, phonetics, interpreting and in producing resources for students on their period of residence abroad have not been without their challenges and we have experienced some reticence from students and educators alike. This chapter will set out a rationale for the adoption of IBL methodologies in language provision, detail the projects undertaken and analyse their results in terms of both measurable ‘product’ and perceived ‘process’-based outcomes. Finally, we will examine the dovetailing of competencies enhanced by IBL with those promoted more generally through language learning, a combination which we believe rends our students highly employable in the global jobs market.

Details

Inquiry-Based Learning for the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences: A Conceptual and Practical Resource for Educators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-236-4

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Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2012

Abstract

Details

Increasing Student Engagement and Retention Using Social Technologies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-239-4

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