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Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2021

Tara Madden-Dent

As high school and college graduates enter today's highly competitive and diverse, globalized economies, cultural competence and social and emotional learning (SEL…

Abstract

As high school and college graduates enter today's highly competitive and diverse, globalized economies, cultural competence and social and emotional learning (SEL) competencies continue being essential skills for college, career, and life success. These capabilities are more than valuable assets, they are employability requirements in a modern workforce dependent on navigating relationships and interactions between people from different backgrounds. In education, educators are increasingly expected to cultivate these skills within equitable learning environments for all students, international and domestic. Recent research demonstrates greater need to support international students in the United States who often experience unique academic barriers, stressors, and lack of support services for managing international relocation and integration into unfamiliar academic and cultural systems. To better understand how culturally responsive SEL education can serve as a lever for increasing equitable conditions for international students and to contribute research-based practices on how distance learning can strengthen culturally responsive SEL skills, the following chapter introduces how one online academic and cultural studies course influenced high school and undergraduate international students. Through qualitative and quantitative sources (e.g., written homework reflections; cultural orientation indicator (COI) report; paper: My Action Plan; course evaluation survey), themes emerged from the data that identified how explicit online SEL education, using a culturally responsive lens, contributed to gains in cultural competence, educational equity, academic and professional development, and self-efficacy.

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1994

Samuel M. Natale, Sebastian A. Sora and Tara Madden

Globalization blurs the boundaries of national identity and national differences between corporations. It is increasingly necessary for corporations to identify with a…

Abstract

Globalization blurs the boundaries of national identity and national differences between corporations. It is increasingly necessary for corporations to identify with a plethora of nations and cultures. Countries that had never been considered major participants in world trade have suddenly emerged as major economic powers. In the past two decades, world trade has expanded from $200 billion to over $4 trillion (Czinkota and Ronkainen, 1993). Yet, the USA's participation in world trade measured as a proportion of world market share has declined drastically. In the early 1950s the USA accounted for nearly 25 per cent of world exports (adjusted for World War II); in 1991 this figure had declined to 12 per cent (Czinkota and Ronkainen, 1993). In 1987 the USA had a trade deficit of $166 billion, larger than that of any other nation (McEnery and DesHarnais, 1990, p. 43). This situation demonstrates a need for American corporations to develop products with a global consciousness in a cross‐cultural context. It is essential that managers acquire cross‐cultural understanding and skills. International business competition requires managers to have not only a knowledge of how to be a global player, but also the ability to implement that knowledge. In response to this, cross‐cultural managers must deal with certain fundamental issues. Three of the most essential issues are: communication, adaptable management strategies that transcend cultural differences, and sufficient investment in human resources.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2021

Abstract

Details

Motivating the SEL Field Forward Through Equity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-464-6

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Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2021

Lobat Asadi and Salma Ali

This chapter identifies the broad interdisciplinary ideologies of entitlement in order to situate and understand the potential theoretical informants of excessiveness in…

Abstract

This chapter identifies the broad interdisciplinary ideologies of entitlement in order to situate and understand the potential theoretical informants of excessiveness in teacher entitlement. Although the authors' perspectives and experiences on the theme of entitlement are located in the US educational system, this is accompanied by an awareness of the need to examine the topic internationally since the topic needs to “be reconsidered in terms of contextual variables.”

Psychological and organizational entitlement were the prevalent strains of entitlement that emerged in the reviewed literature and “academic entitlement” specific to the field of education. Therefore, three strands, psychological, organizational and academic, form the thematic categories for this scoping literature review.

Most literature on “academic entitlement” deals with excessive entitlement amongst students. No reference to excessive teacher entitlement was found. However, specific gaps were found in: (1) what qualifies as excessive teacher entitlement, (2) research scholarship on teacher entitlement, and (3) entitlement studies specifically aimed at global reach and applicable to teachers.

The theoretical informants of teacher entitlement identified in this study indicate that the phenomenon goes beyond individual mindset to encompass the mediation of sociocultural and political factors in its construction, thus rendering a simple theory of excessiveness in association with teacher entitlement improbable at this time.

Details

Understanding Excessive Teacher and Faculty Entitlement
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-940-5

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2019

Afred Suci and Hardi Hardi

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the changes in Islamic financing literacy and draw a comparison between the intentions of Muslim and non-Muslim micro and small…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the changes in Islamic financing literacy and draw a comparison between the intentions of Muslim and non-Muslim micro and small entrepreneurs after receiving counseling. It also observes the role of religion in the relationship between literacy and the intention to use Islamic financing.

Design/methodology/approach

The participants were of 60 owners of micro and small entrepreneurs who were made up of 30 Muslims and 30 non-Muslims. An Islamic financing counseling was conducted on 30 non-Muslims, and data were obtained relating to literacy and intention after the counseling. The data were analyzed using statistical descriptive, associative and comparative test.

Findings

There is a significant increase in literacy and intentions of non-Muslim entrepreneurs after receiving the counseling. It is also discovered that religious factor no longer influences literacy and intention of using Islamic financing after receiving the counseling.

Research limitations/implications

Counseling is an effective way to establish non-Muslims’ literacy and lead their intention toward the use of Islamic financing products.

Practical implications

There is a need to give proper knowledge about the importance of Islamic financing to non-Muslims by emphasizing the monetary values and benefits to diversify the market segment.

Social implications

The finding proves that Islam, in every aspect including the economy, is a blessing to the entire universe or as Muslim says, ‘rahmatan lil “alamin”.

Originality/value

Previous studies about Islamic financing have been mostly conducted by using survey among the Muslim population. Therefore, this study combines both survey and experiment by providing Islamic literacy counseling to non-Muslims.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2009

Neil Selwyn

The purpose of this paper is to develop and promote a realistic understanding of young people and digital technology with a view to supporting information professionals in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and promote a realistic understanding of young people and digital technology with a view to supporting information professionals in playing useful and meaningful roles in supporting current generations of young people. In particular the paper aims to offer a critical perspective on popular and political understandings of young people and digital technologies – characterised by notions of “digital natives”, the “net generation” and other commonsense portrayals of expert young technology users. The paper seeks to consider the accuracy of such descriptions in reflecting young people's actual uses of digital technology and digital information.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a comprehensive review of the recent published literatures on young people and digital technology in information sciences, education studies and media/communication studies.

Findings

The findings show that young people's engagements with digital technologies are varied and often unspectacular – in stark contrast to popular portrayals of the digital native. As such, the paper highlights a misplaced technological and biological determinism that underpins current portrayals of children, young people and digital technology.

Originality/value

The paper challenges the popular assumption that current generations of children and young people are innate, talented users of digital technologies. Having presented a more realistic basis for approaching generational differences in technology use, the paper explores the functions and roles that information professionals can be expected to play in supporting young people in the digital age.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 61 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Lynn Sudbury-Riley, Florian Kohlbacher and Agnes Hofmeister

The purpose of this paper is to investigate self-perceived age among Baby Boomers in the UK, Germany, Japan, and Hungary, and identifies two horizontal segments based on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate self-perceived age among Baby Boomers in the UK, Germany, Japan, and Hungary, and identifies two horizontal segments based on the way consumers view their age.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were used to sample 880 Baby Boomers. Structural equation modeling is used to investigate multinational measurement invariance of the cognitive age scale.

Findings

Two distinct segments are identified, providing support for a young-at-heart consumer culture in all nations in the study. Results also find cognitive age to exhibit partial measurement invariance, which is expected given the disparate nations under study.

Research limitations/implications

This research contributes to cross-cultural global age research which is still in an early pioneering stage. The study builds on a small number of previous studies that validate cognitive age, extends current knowledge of the measurement properties of cognitive age, and identifies two distinct international segments of Baby Boomers. Further research needs to delve into the antecedents of self-perceived age, particularly in the ways in which different life experiences and cultures may impact age identities.

Practical implications

The study has implications for marketing managers wishing to target the increasingly important young-at-heart Baby Boomer.

Originality/value

The study uses four non-American countries, uses samples matched for chronological age, and does not use convenience samples, which make it unique in the cognitive age literature. The study has value for marketing managers, global age researchers, and consumer culture researchers.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 32 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 19 February 2020

Reza Chowdhury, Wootae Chun, Sungchul Choi and Kurtis Friend

The objective of this article is to investigate the moderating role of national cultures in the relationship between brand value and firm value.

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this article is to investigate the moderating role of national cultures in the relationship between brand value and firm value.

Design/methodology/approach

This article examines the topic in the context of different national cultural attributes, including individualism, uncertainty avoidance, masculinity, power distance, and long-term orientation. We use brand values of the Financial Times Global 500 companies and national cultural values reported by Hofstede, GLOBE, and Schwartz.

Findings

Results exhibit that brands are more value-additive to companies in highly individualistic cultures. Furthermore, a valuable brand contributes more to firm value in countries with low uncertainty avoidance, high masculine, low power distance, and short-term oriented cultures.

Originality/value

The evidence suggests that while a valuable brand contributes to firm value, the level of its effect on firm value varies by national cultures.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2013

Anna Marie Johnson, Claudene Sproles and Robert Detmering

– The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

Design/methodology/approach

Introduces and annotates periodical articles, monographs, and audiovisual material examining library instruction and information literacy.

Findings

Provides information about each source, discusses the characteristics of current scholarship, and describes sources that contain unique scholarly contributions and quality reproductions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2011

Tatiana Iakovleva, Lars Kolvereid and Ute Stephan

This study proposes to use the Theory of Planned Behaviour to predict entrepreneurial intentions among students in five developing and nine developed countries. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This study proposes to use the Theory of Planned Behaviour to predict entrepreneurial intentions among students in five developing and nine developed countries. The purpose is to investigate whether entrepreneurial intention and its antecedents differ between developing and developed countries, and to test the theory in the two groups of countries.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 2,225 students in 13 countries participated in this study by responding to a structured questionnaire in classrooms. Structural equation modelling was used to analyse the data.

Findings

The findings indicate that respondents from developing countries have stronger entrepreneurial intentions than those from developed countries. Moreover, the respondents from developing countries also score higher on the theory's antecedents of entrepreneurial intentions – attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioural control – than respondents from developed countries. The findings support the Theory of Planned Behaviour in both developing and developed countries.

Research limitations/implications

The findings strongly support the Theory of Planned Behaviour. The measure of subjective norms used, a multiple‐item index encompassing the views of other people and motivation to comply with these, seems to have advantages over other measures of this concept.

Practical implications

Developing countries need to focus on the development of institutions that can support entrepreneurial efforts. At the same time, developed economies may need to accept that entrepreneurial intentions are dependent on the dynamism of an economic environment and possibly on risk‐perceiving behaviours.

Originality/value

While multiple‐country studies on entrepreneurship in developing and developed countries have been called for, no previous study has compared entrepreneurial intentions between developing and developed countries. The inclusion of developing countries provides a unique quasi‐experimental setting in which to test the theory.

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