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Article
Publication date: 30 July 2020

Zhanna Lyubykh, Nick Turner, Julian Barling, Tara C. Reich and Samantha Batten

This paper investigates the extent to which disability type contributes to differential evaluation of employees by managers. In particular, the authors examined managerial…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates the extent to which disability type contributes to differential evaluation of employees by managers. In particular, the authors examined managerial prejudice against 3 disability diagnoses (i.e. psychiatric, physical disability and pending diagnosis) compared to a control group in a return-to-work scenario.

Design/methodology/approach

Working managers (N = 238) were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 scenarios containing medical documentation for a fictional employee that disclosed either the employee's psychiatric disability, physical disability, or a pending diagnosis. The authors also collected a separate sample (N = 42) as a control group that received a version of the medical documentation but contained no information about the disability diagnosis.

Findings

Compared with employees without stated disabilities, employees with a psychiatric disability were evaluated as more aggressive toward other employees, less trustworthy and less committed to the organization. Compared to employees with either physical disabilities or pending diagnoses, employees with psychiatric disabilities were rated as less committed to the organization. The authors discuss implications for future research and the trade-offs inherent in disability labeling and disclosure.

Originality/value

The current study extends prior research by examining a broader range of outcomes (i.e. perceived aggressiveness, trustworthiness and commitment) and moving beyond performance evaluations of employees with disabilities. The authors also assess the relative status of a “pending diagnosis” category—a type of disclosure often encountered by managers in many jurisdictions as part of accommodating employees returning to work from medical-related absence.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 50 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 8 September 2014

Ann Reich and Paul Hager

This paper aims to problematise practice and contribute to new understandings of professional and workplace learning. Practice is a concept which has been largely taken…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to problematise practice and contribute to new understandings of professional and workplace learning. Practice is a concept which has been largely taken for granted and under-theorised in workplace learning and education research. Practice has usually been co-located with classifiers, such as legal practice, vocational practice, teaching practice and yoga practice, with the theoretical emphasis on the domain – legal, teaching and learning.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a theory-driven paper which posits a framework of six prominent threads for theorizing practice. It uses examples of empirical research to illustrate each thread.

Findings

A framework of six prominent threads for theorising practice in professional learning is suggested. It understands practices as patterned, embodied, networked and emergent and learning entwined with working, knowing, organizing and innovating. By conceptualising learning as occurring via and in practices, prominent understanding of learning are challenged. The paper discusses each thread with reference to empirical research that illuminates it and indicates the contributions of practice theory perspectives in richer understandings of professional learning and change.

Originality/value

This paper engages with the practice turn in social sciences to reconceptualise professional and workplace learning. It contributes to research on learning at work by supplementing current thinking about learning, particularly the socio-cultural conceptions of learning, with the resources of practice theories that attend to the regularities of practice.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 26 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Trump Studies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-779-9

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Article
Publication date: 22 November 2019

Shrikant Mulik, Manjari Srivastava, Nilay Yajnik and Vas Taras

This paper aims to develop and empirically test a model of relationships between antecedents and outcomes of flow experience of users of massive open online courses (MOOC).

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop and empirically test a model of relationships between antecedents and outcomes of flow experience of users of massive open online courses (MOOC).

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers surveyed individuals primarily from India, who had enrolled in at least one MOOC offered by MOOC providers such as Coursera, edX and FutureLearn. The data were collected from 310 individuals using an online questionnaire. The partial least squares technique of structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) was used to test the reliability and validity of the data, and the study’s hypothesized relationships.

Findings

The study found support for identification of telepresence, challenge and skill as antecedents of flow experience. MOOC satisfaction and MOOC usage intention were found to be the outcomes of flow experience, as hypnotized. The study also found the mediating role of MOOC satisfaction in the relationship of flow experience and MOOC usage intention.

Practical implications

The findings indicate that if the MOOC providers can orchestrate flow experience for MOOC users then that will increase the satisfaction of MOOC users, which will lead to increase in MOOC adoption.

Originality/value

The study makes the contribution towards better understanding of flow experience in the context of MOOC usage by identifying both antecedents and outcomes of flow experience. Further, it highlights the influencing role of flow experience on MOOC adoption.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 21 July 2017

Joyce S. Osland, Linda M. Dunn-Jensen, Kyoung-Ah Nam and Pamela Wells

San Jose State University’s (SJSU’s) Global Leadership Advancement Center (GLAC) was established in 2007 in response to a reported scarcity of global leaders in all…

Abstract

San Jose State University’s (SJSU’s) Global Leadership Advancement Center (GLAC) was established in 2007 in response to a reported scarcity of global leaders in all sectors. Its mission is to advance, foster, and disseminate knowledge on global leadership and its development. The center created various programs in three focal areas: Knowledge Creation and Dissemination, Development and Training, and the Social Innovation Initiative. We briefly explain the assessment center, the GLLab (Global Leadership Laboratory), used to varying degrees in all development programs and courses. This chapter describes in detail three of GLAC’s innovative global leadership efforts and their theoretical foundations – an undergraduate global leadership course, the GLLab Exchange Program, and the Global Leadership Passport Program. All GLAC programs are based on research and best practices, which are referenced.

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Steven E. Abraham

As US firms expand into Canada, it becomes necessary for them to be aware of Canadian law governing labour and employment. Unlike what many might think, the laws in the…

Abstract

As US firms expand into Canada, it becomes necessary for them to be aware of Canadian law governing labour and employment. Unlike what many might think, the laws in the two countries are substantially different. Further, the effects of these differences have been demonstrated empirically. Considers the differences between US and Canadian labour law in seven areas: certification procedures; first contract arbitration; new technologies; strike replacements; successorship; employee participation programmes and union security. Discusses the effects of the laws in these areas.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 18 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

Tara Fenwick

Much research to date on professional transitions has focused on predicting them and then preparing individual practitioners to navigate transitions as sites of struggle…

Abstract

Purpose

Much research to date on professional transitions has focused on predicting them and then preparing individual practitioners to navigate transitions as sites of struggle. The purpose of this paper is to critically examine, within the context of professional practice and learning, diverse theoretical approaches that are currently prominent in researching transitions and to propose future directions for research.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper begins by describing work contexts integral with professional transitions: regulation, governance and accountability; new work structures; and knowledge development. The discussion then examines transitions research in developmental psychology, lifecourse sociology, and career studies. These perspectives are compared critically in terms of questions and approaches, contributions to understanding professional transitions, and limitations.

Findings

The implications for educators are a series of critical questions about research and education directed to support transitions in professional learning and work. Future directions and questions for research in professional transitions are suggested in the final section, along with implications for supporting professional learning in these transitions.

Originality/value

The paper is not intended to be comprehensive, but to identify issues for the reader's consideration in thinking about various forms of transition being experienced by professions and professionals. The discussion is theory‐based, exploratory, and indicative, rather than definitive.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2020

Chanki Moon and Ángel Sánchez‐Rodríguez

Antecedents and influences of workplace incivility have recently been studied in many areas of research but there is still a lack of consideration for the impact of…

Abstract

Purpose

Antecedents and influences of workplace incivility have recently been studied in many areas of research but there is still a lack of consideration for the impact of culture. Theoretical considerations for the present research are based on the cultural dimensions of power distance and tightness/looseness because the collective levels of power distance are similar between Korea and Spain, but the collective levels of tightness/looseness are different between the two countries. The purpose of this paper is to examine whether individuals’ occupational position affects their normative reactions to incivility differently.

Design/methodology/approach

Participant (victim)’s (those who react to uncivil behaviors) social power (low vs high) and perpetrator’s (those who exhibit uncivil behaviors) social power (low vs high) were experimentally manipulated; all participants were randomly assigned to one of four perpetrator × victim conditions in relation to hierarchical positions (Ntot = 467).

Findings

The results suggest that the level of social and personal acceptability was greater either among Koreans than Spanish at a collective level or among people who endorsed higher power distance and tightness values. All in all, the findings highlight cultural influences on the importance of social hierarchy as a factor that can impact the people’s normative reactions to incivility.

Originality/value

The findings broaden our understanding of the psychology of employees in relation to incivility, by simultaneously considering the influences of culture (power distance and tightness/looseness) and social power.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 September 2014

Sarah Stewart

This paper aims to shed light on the complex multiplicity of domestic violence interagency work. It proposes a new conceptualisation that reflects the entangled nature of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to shed light on the complex multiplicity of domestic violence interagency work. It proposes a new conceptualisation that reflects the entangled nature of professional practice and learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The research on which this paper draws is an ethnographic study of practice in an integrated local domestic violence initiative. Data include focussed workplace observations, semi-structured interviews and key documents. The study draws on practice-based sociomaterial approaches and the conceptual framework, and methodology is informed by actor-network theory, in particular, the work of Annemarie Mol.

Findings

Findings suggest that interagency work that starts from the victim and traces threads of connection outwards is able to “hang together” as “practice multiple” in integrated service provision. I argue that the learning that happens in these circumstances is a relational effect and depends on who and what is assembled in the actor-network.

Research limitations/implications

The research has significant implications for framing understandings of domestic violence interagency work, as it firmly anchors “working together” to victims. Findings are expected to be of interest not only to practitioners, educators and researchers but also to policymakers.

Originality/value

The paper addresses a current gap in the literature, applies a novel research approach and proposes a new conceptualisation of domestic violence interagency work.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 26 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Julia Gelfand

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 18 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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