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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2021

Jialin Song, Yiyi Su, Taoyong Su and Luyu Wang

The purpose of this paper is, from a resource accumulation and resource allocation perspective, to examine the variant effects of government subsidies among firms with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is, from a resource accumulation and resource allocation perspective, to examine the variant effects of government subsidies among firms with varying levels of market power and to test how industry competition moderates the relationship between market power and allocative efficiency of government subsidies.

Design/methodology/approach

This study explores the relationship between government subsidies and firm performance from a resource-based view. The authors study the moderating role of market power and three-way interaction between subsidy, market power and industry competition on firm performance. The authors test their hypotheses using a sample of Chinese A-share manufacturing firms from 2006–2019. The authors apply firm-level panel data regressions and conduct a series of robustness tests. The marginal effect of market power and industry competition is explored via three-way moderator effect models.

Findings

This study finds that government subsidies are negatively related to firm performance. Market power, on average, strengthens the negative effect of government subsidies on performance, but such a reinforcement effect is neutralized when industry competition is intense. Government subsidies are least efficiently used when firms have market power and industry competition is low. In addition, the authors use different forms of firm performance and a various of robustness tests to verify their assumptions.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature as follows. First, the authors look into subsidy–performance problem from the perspective of the resource-based view and contribute to explaining and mitigating the divergence of current findings on the subsidy–performance relationship. Second, the authors introduce market power and industry competition as moderators to study how resource allocative efficiency affects the subsidy–performance relationship. Third, the authors propose that managerial incentives have played an important role in the allocation of government subsidies, which enriches management practices.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Yiyi Su and Taoyong Su

This paper aims to examine the behavioral determinants of firm research and development (R&D) investment in China by looking into the interaction between performance…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the behavioral determinants of firm research and development (R&D) investment in China by looking into the interaction between performance aspiration and industrial search.

Design/methodology/approach

The author argues that the performance aspiration effect is strengthened in R&D-intensive industries based on the isomorphism rationale, whereas it is weakened by high industry R&D intensity owing to the differentiation rationale. Deriving from the isomorphism and differentiation rationales, the author developed a set of competitive hypotheses and empirically tested them by using a large panel data of 6,539 company-years from China for the period 2001-2003.

Findings

First, R&D intensity is positively related to the deviation of firm performance from aspiration. Second, industry R&D intensity negatively moderates the relationship between performance aspiration and firm R&D intensity for firms performing above aspiration. Therefore, the results provide support for the differentiation rationale.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the ongoing research that provides and tests the behavioral explanations for R&D and innovation. By delving into the moderating role of industry R&D intensity, the author advocate the need for contextualizing performance aspiration in industrial environments. The study informs policymakers and business leaders about the interaction between the external environment and internal decision process in R&D investment decision.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 May 2022

Taoyong Su, Yuzhu Yu, Yuanqing Li and Jintao Zhang

Based on a theoretical framework of ambidexterity in technology sourcing beyond organizational and technological boundaries, this study aims to explore how start-ups…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on a theoretical framework of ambidexterity in technology sourcing beyond organizational and technological boundaries, this study aims to explore how start-ups balance technology sourcing in organizational ambidexterity (TSOA) to produce high venture performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey is distributed among start-ups in the science and technology park of a university in eastern China, producing a total of 45 valid responses. The fuzzy-set approach to qualitative comparative analysis is used in this study.

Findings

The findings show that start-ups achieve high venture performance through external technology sourcing (external exploration and exploitation) in the initial stage. In the growth stage, start-ups adopt external and internal technology sourcing (internal exploration and exploitation) to produce high venture performance. The technology sourcing strategy in ambidextrous activity for start-ups is punctuated equilibrium and evolving from the external ambidexterity to internally and externally coordinate ambidexterity at entrepreneurial stages.

Originality/value

This study creatively adopts configuration-based thinking to investigate how to balance TSOA for high venture performance, extending the literature on technology sourcing and contributing to the balance theory of exploration and exploitation.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2018

Taoyong Su, Junzhe Ji, Qingan Huang and Lei Chen

The study of business ethics has seldom shed light on small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) despite their theoretical and practical significance. Drawing from strain…

Abstract

Purpose

The study of business ethics has seldom shed light on small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) despite their theoretical and practical significance. Drawing from strain perspective, the purpose of this paper is to address this insufficiency and investigate SME owners’ ethical attitudes toward money-related deviances.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a large sample of 741 Chinese SMEs, an OLS regression analysis was employed to test associated hypotheses. The robustness of results was additionally checked.

Findings

The results suggest that for stratification variables, education level is positively related to ethical attitudes, whereas household income level is surprisingly negatively associated with ethical attitudes; for materialism facets, success and happiness exert a negative impact on ethical attitudes as hypothesized, but centrality has no associated impact.

Research limitations/implications

This study has examined both structural and motivational sources of personal strains on the ethical attitude of SME owners, while the characteristics of these strains could be explored in the future studies.

Originality/value

This study advances and complements the dominant behavior approach that emphasizes cognitive and other psychological processes in explaining individual ethical attitudes. It is also seemingly the first study to examine the influence of three materialism facets on entrepreneurial ethical attitudes.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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